Publications by authors named "Austen Stoelting"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

False-Negative CSF Cryptococcal Antigen with Meningoencephalitis in Southeastern United States: A Case Report and Literature Review.

Case Rep Infect Dis 2020 13;2020:8232178. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Department of Internal Medicine, Grand Strand Health, Myrtle Beach, SC, USA.

A 70-year-old immunocompetent male in South Carolina was admitted secondary to altered mental status and headache without focal neurological deficits. Head CT was negative. Lumbar puncture (LP) revealed normal glucose, elevated protein, and lymphocytosis. Opening pressure was 15 cm of H20. CSF lateral flow assay was negative for cryptococcal antigen; CSF cultures showed no growth. The patient rapidly improved on acyclovir and was diagnosed with presumed viral meningitis, as viral PCR and fungal culture were pending at time of discharge. The patient's condition quickly worsened and the patient returned one day later with right arm weakness and dysarthria. Brain MRI revealed T2/flair signal abnormalities in the left frontal lobe with associated parenchymal enhancement. Repeat LP revealed increasing white blood cell count with a worsening lymphocytosis and decreasing glucose, and opening pressure remained normal. CSF fungal culture from the first admission grew , and repeated CSF cryptococcal antigen and culture returned positive. The patient was started on IV steroids, induction Amphotericin and Fluconazole, followed by maintenance oral Fluconazole. The patient's clinical course was complicated by a brainstem lacunar infarction, which led to demise. We present this case of meningoencephalitis to highlight the risk factors, characteristics, and challenges in diagnosis and treatment of an emerging disease in the Southeastern United States.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/8232178DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7376414PMC
July 2020

Atrioesophageal fistula with meningitis: A rare complication of atrial fibrillation ablation, case report and literature review.

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2020 Sep 16;57:91-94. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Department of Internal Medicine. Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, SC, USA.

Atrioesophageal fistula is a rare, devastating complication of atrial fibrillation ablation, reportedly occurring in 0.015-0.04% of catheter ablations. A 66-year-old African American male with a past medical history of chronic atrial fibrillation status post recent radiofrequency ablation and on chronic anticoagulation with rivaroxaban presented with left upper extremity numbness, tingling, and transient weakness. He was admitted for a cerebrovascular accident workup; a 12-lead electrocardiogram revealed atrial fibrillation and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was consistent with multifocal embolic infarcts. Hospital course was further complicated by persistent high-grade fevers, gram-positive bacteremia, and worsening mental status requiring mechanical ventilation. Lumbar puncture was consistent with bacterial meningitis. Transthoracic echocardiogram was negative for vegetations. Computed tomography angiography of the chest with intravenous contrast revealed an outpouching off the posterior wall of the left atrium at the level of the inferior pulmonary vein, consistent with an atrioesophageal fistula. We present this case to highlight the clinical features of a rare but potentially fatal complication from a commonly performed procedure requiring prompt recognition and life-saving intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2020.07.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7381424PMC
September 2020

Sarcoidosis presenting as massive splenomegaly and severe epistaxis, case report.

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2020 Jun 8;54:6-9. Epub 2020 Apr 8.

Department of Internal Medicine, Grand Strand Medical Center, 809 82nd Pkwy, Myrtle Beach, SC, 29572, USA.

Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder of unknown etiology. Extrapulmonary sarcoidosis can involve any organ, but isolated spleen involvement is rare. Diagnosis can be challenging as other etiologies may have similar presentations. A 58-year-old African American female presented with life threatening epistaxis, anemia, refractory thrombocytopenia, and massive splenomegaly. Lymphoproliferative, infectious, and autoimmune etiologies were eliminated with laboratory testing and bone marrow biopsy. The patient had multiple splenic artery aneurysms precluding an open diagnostic splenectomy. Partial splenic artery embolization was performed, which normalized the platelet count and resolved the spontaneous bleeding. This allowed diagnostic splenectomy and splenic artery repair to be safely performed. Surgical pathology demonstrated extensive non-caseating granulomas consistent with sarcoidosis. We present this case to demonstrate the omnipotent nature of sarcoidosis and a complex multi-disciplinary approach for successful diagnosis and treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2020.03.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7160383PMC
June 2020

Metastatic Small-Cell Lung Cancer Presenting as Primary Adrenal Insufficiency.

Case Rep Oncol Med 2020 11;2020:7018619. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

Department of Internal Medicine, Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, SC, USA.

A 40-year-old male smoker with HIV was admitted for cough, hypotension, and abdominal pain for 5 days. Chest radiography showed a right lower lobe consolidation. CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis revealed paratracheal adenopathy, a 5.8 × 4.5 cm mass invading the right bronchus intermedius, and dense bilateral adrenal masses, measuring 5.4 × 4.0 cm on the right and 4.8 × 2.0 cm on the left. Laboratory studies showed white blood cell count of 18.5 K/mm, sodium of 131 mmol/L, creatinine of 1.6 mg/dL, and CD4 count of 567 cells/mm. The random morning cortisol level was 7.0 g/dL, the ACTH stimulation test yielded inappropriate response, and a random serum ACTH was elevated at 83.4 pg/mL. MRI brain revealed no pituitary adenoma confirming primary adrenal insufficiency. The adrenal CT washout study was consistent with solid mass content, concerning for metastasis. Bronchoscopy with endobronchial mass and paratracheal lymph node biopsy confirmed small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Intravenous steroids, 100 mg hydrocortisone every 8 hours, improved his hypotension and abdominal pain. PET scan revealed metabolically active right paratracheal mass, right hilar mass, and bilateral adrenal masses. Treatment included palliative chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin/etoposide/atezolizumab and chest radiation. We present this novel case to demonstrate SCLC's ability to cause primary adrenal insufficiency, as well as evaluate clinical response to chemotherapeutics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/7018619DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7106905PMC
March 2020
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