Publications by authors named "Aurore Fablet"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The VP3 Protein of Bluetongue Virus Associates with the MAVS Complex and Interferes with the RIG-I-Signaling Pathway.

Viruses 2021 02 2;13(2). Epub 2021 Feb 2.

UMR 1161 Virologie, Laboratory for Animal Health, INRAE, Department of Animal Health, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, ANSES, Université Paris-Est, 94700 Maisons-Alfort, France.

Bluetongue virus (BTV), an arbovirus transmitted by biting midges, is a major concern of wild and domestic ruminants. While BTV induces type I interferon (alpha/beta interferon [IFN-α/β]) production in infected cells, several reports have described evasion strategies elaborated by this virus to dampen this intrinsic, innate response. In the present study, we suggest that BTV VP3 is a new viral antagonist of the IFN-β synthesis. Indeed, using split luciferase and coprecipitation assays, we report an interaction between VP3 and both the mitochondrial adapter protein MAVS and the IRF3-kinase IKKε. Overall, this study describes a putative role for the BTV structural protein VP3 in the control of the antiviral response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v13020230DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7913109PMC
February 2021

Bovine Organospecific Microvascular Endothelial Cell Lines as New and Relevant In Vitro Models to Study Viral Infections.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Jul 24;21(15). Epub 2020 Jul 24.

Center for Molecular Biophysics UPR4301 CNRS, 45000 Orléans, France.

Microvascular endothelial cells constitute potential targets for exogenous microorganisms, in particular for vector-borne pathogens. Their phenotypic and functional variations according to the organs they are coming from provide an explanation of the organ selectivity expressed in vivo by pathogens. In order to make available relevant tools for in vitro studies of infection mechanisms, our aim was to immortalize bovine organospecific endothelial cells but also to assess their permissivity to viral infection. Using transfection with SV40 large T antigen, six bovine microvascular endothelial cell lines from various organs and one macrovascular cell line from an umbilical cord were established. They display their own panel of endothelial progenitor/mature markers, as assessed by flow cytometry and RT-qPCR, as well as the typical angiogenesis capacity. Using both Bluetongue and foot-and-mouth disease viruses, we demonstrate that some cell lines are preferentially infected. In addition, they can be transfected and are able to express viral proteins such as BTV8-NS3. Such microvascular endothelial cell lines bring innovative tools for in vitro studies of infection by viruses or bacteria, allowing for the study of host-pathogen interaction mechanisms with the actual in vivo target cells. They are also suitable for applications linked to microvascularization, such as anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor research, growing fields in veterinary medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms21155249DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7432920PMC
July 2020

Novel Function of Bluetongue Virus NS3 Protein in Regulation of the MAPK/ERK Signaling Pathway.

J Virol 2019 08 30;93(16). Epub 2019 Jul 30.

UMR Virologie, INRA, École Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, ANSES, Université Paris-Est, Maisons-Alfort, France

Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an arbovirus transmitted by blood-feeding midges to a wide range of wild and domestic ruminants. In this report, we showed that BTV, through its nonstructural protein NS3 (BTV-NS3), is able to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway, as assessed by phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and the translation initiation factor eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). By combining immunoprecipitation of BTV-NS3 and mass spectrometry analysis from both BTV-infected and NS3-transfected cells, we identified the serine/threonine-protein kinase B-Raf (BRAF), a crucial player in the MAPK/ERK pathway, as a new cellular interactor of BTV-NS3. BRAF silencing led to a significant decrease in the MAPK/ERK activation by BTV, supporting a model wherein BTV-NS3 interacts with BRAF to activate this signaling cascade. This positive regulation acts independently of the role of BTV-NS3 in counteracting the induction of the alpha/beta interferon response. Furthermore, the intrinsic ability of BTV-NS3 to bind BRAF and activate the MAPK/ERK pathway is conserved throughout multiple serotypes/strains but appears to be specific to BTV compared to other members of genus. Inhibition of MAPK/ERK pathway with U0126 reduced viral titers, suggesting that BTV manipulates this pathway for its own replication. Altogether, our data provide molecular mechanisms that unravel a new essential function of NS3 during BTV infection. Bluetongue virus (BTV) is responsible of the arthropod-borne disease bluetongue (BT) transmitted to ruminants by blood-feeding midges. In this report, we found that BTV, through its nonstructural protein NS3 (BTV-NS3), interacts with BRAF, a key component of the MAPK/ERK pathway. In response to growth factors, this pathway promotes cell survival and increases protein translation. We showed that BTV-NS3 enhances the MAPK/ERK pathway, and this activation is BRAF dependent. Treatment of MAPK/ERK pathway with the pharmacologic inhibitor U0126 impairs viral replication, suggesting that BTV manipulates this pathway for its own benefit. Our results illustrate, at the molecular level, how a single virulence factor has evolved to target a cellular function to increase its viral replication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00336-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6675888PMC
August 2019

Nonstructural Protein NSs of Schmallenberg Virus Is Targeted to the Nucleolus and Induces Nucleolar Disorganization.

J Virol 2017 Jan 16;91(1). Epub 2016 Dec 16.

ANSES, UMR1161 Virologie, Laboratory for Animal Health, Maisons-Alfort, France

Schmallenberg virus (SBV) was discovered in Germany in late 2011 and then spread rapidly to many European countries. SBV is an orthobunyavirus that causes abortion and congenital abnormalities in ruminants. A virus-encoded nonstructural protein, termed NSs, is a major virulence factor of SBV, and it is known to promote the degradation of Rpb1, a subunit of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) complex, and therefore hampers global cellular transcription. In this study, we found that NSs is mainly localized in the nucleus of infected cells and specifically appears to target the nucleolus through a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) localized between residues 33 and 51 of the protein. NSs colocalizes with nucleolar markers such as B23 (nucleophosmin) and fibrillarin. We observed that in SBV-infected cells, B23 undergoes a nucleolus-to-nucleoplasm redistribution, evocative of virus-induced nucleolar disruption. In contrast, the nucleolar pattern of B23 was unchanged upon infection with an SBV recombinant mutant with NSs lacking the NoLS motif (SBVΔNoLS). Interestingly, unlike wild-type SBV, the inhibitory activity of SBVΔNoLS toward RNA Pol II transcription is impaired. Overall, our results suggest that a putative link exists between NSs-induced nucleolar disruption and its inhibitory function on cellular transcription, which consequently precludes the cellular antiviral response and/or induces cell death.

Importance: Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an emerging arbovirus of ruminants that spread in Europe between 2011 and 2013. SBV induces fetal abnormalities during gestation, with the central nervous system being one of the most affected organs. The virus-encoded NSs protein acts as a virulence factor by impairing host cell transcription. Here, we show that NSs contains a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) and induces disorganization of the nucleolus. The NoLS motif in the SBV NSs is absolutely necessary for virus-induced inhibition of cellular transcription. To our knowledge, this is the first report of nucleolar functions for NSs within the Bunyaviridae family.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01263-16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5165206PMC
January 2017

Complete Genome Sequence of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 8, Which Reemerged in France in August 2015.

Genome Announc 2016 Apr 14;4(2). Epub 2016 Apr 14.

Anses, Laboratory of Ploufragan, Unit of Viral Genetics and Biosafety, Ploufragan, France.

We announce here the complete genome sequence (coding and noncoding) of the bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 8, isolated from a ram in Allier department, France, 2015. Sequence analysis confirms the reemergence of the BTV-8 strain that previously circulated in France until 2009 and other European countries until 2010.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.00163-16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4832148PMC
April 2016

Novel bluetongue virus in goats, Corsica, France, 2014.

Emerg Infect Dis 2014 Dec;20(12):2123-5

During 2000-2013, 4 genotypes of bluetongue virus (BTV) were detected in Corsica, France. At the end of 2013, a compulsory BTV-1 vaccination campaign was initiated among domestic ruminants; biological samples from goats were tested as part of a corresponding monitoring program. A BTV strain with nucleotide sequences suggestive of a novel serotype was detected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2012.140924DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257820PMC
December 2014

Detection of Listeria spp. in liquid egg products and in the egg breaking plants environment and tracking of Listeria monocytogenes by PFGE.

Int J Food Microbiol 2013 Aug 20;166(1):109-16. Epub 2013 Jun 20.

Anses, French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety, Ploufragan/Plouzané Laboratory, BP 53, 22 440 Ploufragan, France.

Human listeriosis, caused by Listeria monocytogenes, is a severe bacterial infection that can lead to meningitis, cerebromeningitis, bacteremia or septicemia, with acute lethality and potentially leading to death. A study has shown that 29.5% of the caged laying hens in France are contaminated by L. monocytogenes (Chemaly et al., 2008). However, very little information regarding egg and egg product contamination is currently available. The objective of this study is to determine the sanitary status of egg products and egg breaking plants in France regarding Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes contaminations. The sampling scheme performed in five egg breaking plants in Western France during one year have revealed that 8.5% of raw egg products were contaminated by L. monocytogenes. No pasteurized egg products have been shown to be contaminated by L. monocytogenes. However, a high level of contamination by Listeria spp., and particularly by L. innocua, has been shown with 26.2% and 1.8% of raw and pasteurized egg products contaminated, respectively. This work has also revealed the presence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in the environment of egg breaking plants with 65.1% and 8.0% of contaminated samples, respectively. The typing of 253 isolates of L. monocytogenes by PFGE using ApaI and AscI enzymes has revealed a high diversity with 46 different pulsotypes and has shown that the raw material is a source of contamination of egg breaking plants. One L. monocytogenes cluster was dominant in the 5 egg-breaking plants during the four seasons studied. The issue of which strains are better adapted to egg products must be considered and studied in depth by comparing them to pulsotypes from strains of other chains. However, the traceability of L. monocytogenes in plants during the various seasons has also made it possible to highlight the presence of strains that are specific to egg breaking plants. The study of cleaning and disinfection methods in these plants as well as the recurring bacteria's resistance to disinfectants could provide answers to the egg product industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2013.06.014DOI Listing
August 2013