Publications by authors named "Auriole Tamegnon"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Identification of distinct immune landscapes using an automated nine-color multiplex immunofluorescence staining panel and image analysis in paraffin tumor tissues.

Sci Rep 2021 Feb 25;11(1):4530. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 9512130 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.

Immune profiling is becoming a vital tool for identifying predictive and prognostic markers for translational studies. The study of the tumor microenvironment (TME) in paraffin tumor tissues such as malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) could yield insights to actionable targets to improve patient outcome. Here, we optimized and tested a new immune-profiling method to characterize immune cell phenotypes in paraffin tissues and explore the co-localization and spatial distribution between the immune cells within the TME and the stromal or tumor compartments. Tonsil tissues and tissue microarray (TMA) were used to optimize an automated nine-color multiplex immunofluorescence (mIF) panel to study the TME using eight antibodies: PD-L1, PD-1, CD3, CD8, Foxp3, CD68, KI67, and pancytokeratin. To explore the potential role of the cells into the TME with this mIF panel we applied this panel in twelve MPM cases to assess the multiple cell phenotypes obtained from the image analysis and well as their spatial distribution in this cohort. We successful optimized and applied an automated nine-color mIF panel to explore a small set of MPM cases. Image analysis showed a high degree of cell phenotype diversity with immunosuppression patterns in the TME of the MPM cases. Mapping the geographic cell phenotype distribution in the TME, we were able to identify two distinct, complex immune landscapes characterized by specific patterns of cellular distribution as well as cell phenotype interactions with malignant cells. Successful we showed the optimization and reproducibility of our mIF panel and their incorporation for comprehensive TME immune profiling into translational studies that could refine our ability to correlate immunologic phenotypes with specific patterns of cells distribution and distance analysis. Overall, this will improve our ability to understand the behavior of cells within the TME and predict new treatment strategies to improve patient outcome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-83858-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7907283PMC
February 2021

Procedural Requirements and Recommendations for Multiplex Immunofluorescence Tyramide Signal Amplification Assays to Support Translational Oncology Studies.

Cancers (Basel) 2020 Jan 21;12(2). Epub 2020 Jan 21.

Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

In the development of a multiplex immunofluorescence (IF) platform and the optimization and validation of new multiplex IF panels using a tyramide signal amplification system, several technical requirements are important for high-quality staining, analysis, and results. The aim of this review is to discuss the basic requirements for performing multiplex IF tyramide signal amplification (TSA) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancer tissues to support translational oncology research. Our laboratory has stained approximately 4000 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples using the multiplex IF TSA system for immune profiling of several labeled biomarkers in a single slide to elucidate cancer biology at a protein level and identify therapeutic targets and biomarkers. By analyzing several proteins in thousands of cells on a single slide, this technique provides a systems-level view of various processes in various tumor tissues. Although this technology shows high flexibility in cancer studies, it presents several challenges when applied to study different histology cancers. Our experience shows that adequate antibody validation, staining optimization, analysis strategies, and data generation are important steps for generating quality results. Tissue management, fixation procedures, storage, and cutting can also affect the results of the assay and must be standardized. Overall, this method is reliable for supporting translational research given a precise, step-by-step approach.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers12020255DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7072187PMC
January 2020