Publications by authors named "Aurélie Canicio"

2 Publications

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Phospholipid transfer to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) upon triglyceride lipolysis is directly correlated with HDL-cholesterol levels and is not associated with cardiovascular risk.

Atherosclerosis 2021 Mar 9;324:1-8. Epub 2021 Mar 9.

National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM) UMR_S 1166, Faculty of Medicine Pitie-Salpetriere, 91 Bld de L'Hopital, 75013, Paris, France; Sorbonne University, Paris, France.

Background And Aims: While low concentrations of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) represent a well-established cardiovascular risk factor, extremely high HDL-C is paradoxically associated with elevated cardiovascular risk, resulting in the U-shape relationship with cardiovascular disease. Free cholesterol transfer to HDL upon lipolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRL) was recently reported to underlie this relationship, linking HDL-C to triglyceride metabolism and atherosclerosis. In addition to free cholesterol, other surface components of TGRL, primarily phospholipids, are transferred to HDL during lipolysis. It remains indeterminate as to whether such transfer is linked to HDL-C and cardiovascular disease.

Methods And Results: When TGRL was labelled with fluorescent phospholipid 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), time- and dose-dependent transfer of DiI to HDL was observed upon incubations with lipoprotein lipase (LPL). The capacity of HDL to acquire DiI was decreased by -36% (p<0.001) in low HDL-C patients with acute myocardial infarction (n = 22) and by -95% (p<0.001) in low HDL-C subjects with Tangier disease (n = 7), unchanged in low HDL-C patients with Type 2 diabetes (n = 17) and in subjects with high HDL-C (n = 20), and elevated in subjects with extremely high HDL-C (+11%, p<0.05) relative to healthy normolipidemic controls. Across all the populations combined, HDL capacity to acquire DiI was directly correlated with HDL-C (r = 0.58, p<0.001). No relationship of HDL capacity to acquire DiI with both overall and cardiovascular mortality obtained from epidemiological studies for the mean HDL-C levels observed in the studied populations was obtained.

Conclusions: These data indicate that the capacity of HDL to acquire phospholipid from TGRL upon LPL-mediated lipolysis is proportional to HDL-C and does not reflect cardiovascular risk in subjects widely differing in HDL-C levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2021.03.002DOI Listing
March 2021

Free cholesterol transfer to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) upon triglyceride lipolysis underlies the U-shape relationship between HDL-cholesterol and cardiovascular disease.

Eur J Prev Cardiol 2020 10 15;27(15):1606-1616. Epub 2019 Dec 15.

National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM) UMR_S 1166, Faculty of Medicine Pitié-Salpétrière, Paris, France.

Background: Low concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) represent a well-established cardiovascular risk factor. Paradoxically, extremely high HDL-C levels are equally associated with elevated cardiovascular risk, resulting in the U-shape relationship of HDL-C with cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms underlying this association are presently unknown. We hypothesised that the capacity of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to acquire free cholesterol upon triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TGRL) lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase underlies the non-linear relationship between HDL-C and cardiovascular risk.

Methods: To assess our hypothesis, we developed a novel assay to evaluate the capacity of HDL to acquire free cholesterol (as fluorescent TopFluor® cholesterol) from TGRL upon in vitro lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

Results: When the assay was applied to several populations markedly differing in plasma HDL-C levels, transfer of free cholesterol was significantly decreased in low HDL-C patients with acute myocardial infarction (-45%) and type 2 diabetes (-25%), and in subjects with extremely high HDL-C of >2.59 mmol/L (>100 mg/dL) (-20%) versus healthy normolipidaemic controls. When these data were combined and plotted against HDL-C concentrations, an inverse U-shape relationship was observed. Consistent with these findings, animal studies revealed that the capacity of HDL to acquire cholesterol upon lipolysis was reduced in low HDL-C apolipoprotein A-I knock-out mice and was negatively correlated with aortic accumulation of [H]-cholesterol after oral gavage, attesting this functional characteristic as a negative metric of postprandial atherosclerosis.

Conclusions: Free cholesterol transfer to HDL upon TGRL lipolysis may underlie the U-shape relationship between HDL-C and cardiovascular disease, linking HDL-C to triglyceride metabolism and atherosclerosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2047487319894114DOI Listing
October 2020