Publications by authors named "Audrey Hang Hai"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Solution-Focused Brief Therapy for Substance Use: A Review of the Literature.

Health Soc Work 2021 May 10. Epub 2021 May 10.

Substance use is a prevalent public health issue. Most social workers may encounter substance use in their work with clients and need effective therapeutic strategies for this issue. Since the 1980s, solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) has been practiced with clients who have substance use problems, and clinical training materials have been developed to help practitioners learn and use SFBT in substance use treatment. Despite the longevity of the use of SFBT in practice, there are no published reviews of outcome studies to guide practitioners using SFBT. This article fills a gap in current literature on SFBT and substance use treatment by reviewing the published studies on SFBT where the focus was on substance use treatment. Five databases were searched to identify eligible studies. Experts and reference lists of relevant studies were also consulted. Nine studies were identified and included in the review. All studies reviewed found promising evidence on SFBT's effectiveness in improving substance use behaviors and related psychosocial problems. Five of the nine studies reviewed showed that SFBT can change substance use and comorbid mental health and psychosocial problems such as depression, trauma, and school- and work-related behavior problems. The article concludes with a discussion of the study results' implications for clinical practice and future research.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hsw/hlab002DOI Listing
May 2021

LSD use in the United States: Trends, correlates, and a typology of us.

Drug Alcohol Depend 2021 Jun 20;223:108715. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

School of Social Work, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, 02467, United States.

Background: Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in LSD. This study investigates current information on the trends and correlates of LSD use from years 2002-2018 and seeks to develop an initial typology of use and misuse.

Methods: Data is taken from the NSDUH (National Survey on Drug Use and Health) collected between 2002 and 2018 and trends and correlates of LSD use were analyzed with a survey adjusted logistic regression.

Results: Our findings indicate that LSD use has increased 200 % over the study period (.23 % 2002-2005 to .72 % 2015-2018, AOR = 1.10, 95 % CI = 1.08, 1.12). Our findings also indicate several correlates of LSD use including higher levels of education (college degrees: AOR = 1.62, 95 % CI = 1.23, 2.13), not being married (divorced or separated, AOR = 2.31, 95 % CI = 1.44, 3.73, and have never been married, AOR = 5.67, f 95 % CI = 4.09, 7.86), as well as higher levels of antisocial behavior (having been arrested AOR = 3.20, 95 % CI = 2.50, 4.09) and comorbid mental health and substance abuse disorders (serious psychological distress, AOR = 2.39, 95 % CI = 2.05, 2.80). Further, four distinct subclasses were also discovered within LSD users and two of these subtypes of LSD users contained comorbid mental health disturbances and heavy involvement in the criminal justice system.

Conclusion: LSD use has been on the rise within the last decades, particularly among those who are well educated. Two subclasses of LSD use (those with severe comorbid mental health disorders and those with criminal justice involvement) may require further interventions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2021.108715DOI Listing
June 2021

Prevalence and Correlates of Driving Under the Influence of Cannabis in the U.S.

Am J Prev Med 2021 Jun 13;60(6):e251-e260. Epub 2021 Mar 13.

Graduate School of Social Welfare, College of Social Sciences, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; School of Social Work, College for Public Health and Social Justice, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri.

Introduction: As cannabis use rises among adults in the U.S., driving under the influence of cannabis represents a public health concern.

Methods: In 2020, public-use data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health were examined, using an analytic sample of 128,205 adults interviewed between 2016 and 2018. The annual prevalence of driving under the influence of cannabis was computed overall, by state, by demographic group, and among cannabis users. Demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral correlates of driving under the influence were tested by multivariate logistic regression.

Results: The self-reported annual prevalence of driving under the influence of cannabis was 4.5% (95% CI=4.3, 4.6) among U.S. adults, ranging from 3.0% (Texas) to 8.4% (Oregon) in individual U.S. states. Among cannabis users, 29.5% (95% CI=28.6, 30.3) reported driving under the influence of cannabis; the predicted probabilities of driving under the influence of cannabis were highest for those with more frequent use, with daily cannabis users evidencing a 57% predicted probability. Among individuals with symptoms suggestive of a cannabis use disorder, the prevalence of driving under the influence of cannabis was 63.8% (95% CI=60.8, 66.6). Among cannabis users, those reporting driving under the influence of cannabis had higher odds of driving under the influence of other illicit substances, using other illicit drugs, taking part in illegal behavior, and suffering from mental distress, after adjusting for demographic characteristics and psychosocial/behavioral correlates.

Conclusions: Findings suggest that prevention efforts should focus on frequent and problem cannabis users and should include content related to other illicit drug use and other drug-impaired driving.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2021.01.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8154651PMC
June 2021

Efficacy of two-way prayer meditation in improving the psychospiritual well-being of people with substance use disorders: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

Subst Abus 2021 Jan 20:1-17. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Steve Hicks School of Social Work, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA.

The study goal was to conduct a preliminary evaluation of a spiritual intervention called Two Way Prayer Meditation's (TWPM) effectiveness on the psychological distress, self-esteem, and spiritual well-being of people with substance use disorders. : This study employed a randomized controlled trial design with pretest and posttest. In total, 134 adults in four residential recovery programs participated in the study and were randomly assigned to either the TWPM group or the treatment as usual group. Primary and sensitivity analyses were conducted using linear mixed modeling. Hedges's g was used to estimate treatment effect sizes. : Both primary and sensitivity analyses found significant treatment effects on daily spiritual experiences (Hedges's  = 0.62), reliance on God ( = 0.49), private religious practice ( = 0.36), and positive religious/spiritual coping ( = 0.68). Treatment effects on psychological distress ( = 0.33), self-esteem ( = 0.41), and overall spirituality self-ranking ( = 0.32) reached significance in the primary analysis but not in the sensitivity analysis. : This study found evidence of TWPM's effectiveness in improving some aspects of the spiritual well-being of adults with substance use disorders. TWPM was also found to be promising in decreasing psychological distress and increasing self-esteem.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2020.1865244DOI Listing
January 2021

Trends in cannabis views and use among American adults: Intersections with alcohol consumption, 2002-2018.

Addict Behav 2021 05 7;116:106818. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

Graduate School of Social Welfare, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; School of Social Work, College for Public Health and Social Justice, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, United States.

Purpose: The present study aims to examine trends in cannabis views and use among US adults who are alcohol abstainers, non-binge drinkers, and binge drinkers.

Methods: We used data from the 2002-2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (US adults ages 18 and older, n = 664,152). Consistent with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, we conducted survey-adjusted logistic regression analyses to examine the significance of survey year in relation to cannabis views/use while controlling for demographic factors.

Results: Between 2002 and 2018, the proportion of adults reporting strong disapproval of cannabis use initiation decreased significantly (AOR = 0.947, CI = 0.945-948). While the prevalence of cannabis use increased significantly for non-binge (AOR = 1.070, CI = 1.065-1.076) and binge drinkers (AOR = 1.039, CI = 1.035-1.042), the trend increase was greatest among abstainers (OR = 1.099, CI = 1.088-1.111). The association between disapproval and cannabis use did not change between 2003 and 2018 among alcohol abstainers, but weakened among both non-binge (2003-2006: AOR = 0.154, CI = 0.135-0.176; 2014-2018: AOR = 0.221, CI = 0.200-0.246) and binge drinkers (2003-2006: AOR = 0.297, CI = 0.275-0.321; 2014-2018: AOR = 0.361, CI = 0.333-0.391).

Conclusion: Cannabis disapproval has decreased and cannabis use increased among alcohol abstainers, non-binge drinkers, and binge drinkers between 2002 and 2018. The impact of cannabis disapproval on use attenuated during the study period among drinkers but not among abstainers, suggesting that the effect of anti-cannabis attitudes may be weakening among those most likely to use cannabis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2021.106818DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7887096PMC
May 2021

Trends and correlates of Internet support group participation for mental health problems in the United States, 2004-2018.

J Psychiatr Res 2021 01 16;132:136-143. Epub 2020 Oct 16.

School of Social Work, Boston College, Boston, MA, 02467, United States.

Purpose: This study sought to examine the trends in Internet support group (ISG) participation among U.S. adults and to investigate the sociodemographic and behavioral health profiles of ISG participants.

Methods: Data was derived from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2004-2018, n = 625,883). Logistic regression was used to examine significance of trend year and correlates of ISG participation. Latent class analysis was conducted to identify subtypes of ISG participants.

Results: The proportion of U.S. adults participating in ISG increased significantly from 2.29% (2004-2007) to 3.55% (2016-2018). ISG participants were less likely to be male, 35 or older, be part of an ethnic/racial minority group, or have household incomes between $20,000 and $49,999. Black/African American participants and those classified as "other" race showed the largest percent increases, while Hispanics showed no change. ISG participants were more likely to have experienced a depressive episode and to have used cannabis. Three subtypes of ISG participants were identified, including the Lower Behavioral Health Risk group (62%), the Elevated Behavioral Health Risk group (24%), and the Depression, Cigarettes, and Cannabis group (14%).

Conclusion: Overall, we found an increasing trend in seeking mental health care through ISG among US adults since the early 2000s. While disparities among some disadvantaged groups such as Blacks/African Americans and individuals with lower household income were diminishing, continuing efforts to engage men, older adults, and Hispanics in ISG are needed. This investigation also identified distinct subtypes of ISG participants and provides important implications for future research on ISG.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2020.10.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7566800PMC
January 2021

An Evaluation of Working on What Works (WOWW): A Solution-Focused Intervention for Schools.

J Marital Fam Ther 2020 Oct 30;46(4):687-700. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

The University of Texas at Austin.

Working on What Works (WOWW) is a manualized, 10-week classroom intervention based on solution-focused brief therapy. This study evaluates WOWW using a randomized experimental, posttest-only design. The study included 30 fourth and fifth grade classrooms, containing 30 teachers and 413 students. Results indicate no significant differences between WOWW and control groups for student internalizing and externalizing behaviors, student-teacher relationships, student academic performance, or teacher sense of efficacy. However, students in the WOWW group had significantly fewer days absent from school compared with the control group. Additionally, teachers' ratings on WOWW classrooms' performance improved significantly more than teachers' ratings on the control classrooms. Results from this study show that WOWW is a feasible intervention for therapists to use in schools and can be implemented across classrooms in both public and private schools. WOWW has potential to improve student attendance and classroom performance, both of which are important areas of concern for schools.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jmft.12424DOI Listing
October 2020

Correction to: Cognitive behavioral therapy for primary care depression and anxiety: a secondary meta-analytic review using robust variance estimation in meta-regression.

J Behav Med 2020 Apr;43(2):339

Department of Sociology and Social Work, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai, China.

The original version of this article unfortunately contained a typo in the second author surname. The author surname was incorrectly listed as Borhneimer. The correct name should be Bornheimer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10865-019-00132-2DOI Listing
April 2020

The Efficacy of Technology-Based Interventions for Alcohol and Illicit Drug Use Among Women of Childbearing Age: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2019 12 20;43(12):2464-2479. Epub 2019 Oct 20.

University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas.

Background: Alcohol and illicit drug use is prevalent among women of childbearing age and may lead to higher risk for substance-exposed pregnancy and related health consequences for both women and their offspring. Technology-based interventions (TBIs) are increasingly used to prevent or reduce substance use among women of childbearing age. The efficacy of these approaches, however, is unclear. This review critically reviewed existing research evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy of TBIs in preventing and reducing alcohol and illicit drug use among childbearing-aged women.

Methods: Seven electronic databases were searched to identify eligible studies. Two reviewers independently screened studies, extracted data, and assessed risks of bias. Robust variance estimation in meta-regression was used to estimate effect sizes and conduct moderator analyses.

Results: Fifteen RCTs including 3,488 participants were included in the systematic review. Meta-analysis results based on 13 RCTs suggest that TBIs were efficacious relative to control conditions in preventing and reducing substance use among women of childbearing age (d = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.02, 0.35). Preliminary moderator analysis results suggest that the efficacy of TBIs might not vary by participant age, race/ethnicity, the type of technology used, or whether a virtual health assistant was used. TBIs' efficacy in terms of specific substance use types (alcohol use and illicit drug use) or control types (inactive control and active controls) was inconclusive, due to the limited number of studies in each category.

Conclusions: This systematic review and meta-analysis found evidence of TBIs' efficacy in reducing alcohol and illicit drug use among women of childbearing age. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acer.14203DOI Listing
December 2019

The efficacy of spiritual/religious interventions for substance use problems: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Drug Alcohol Depend 2019 09 15;202:134-148. Epub 2019 Jul 15.

Steve Hicks School of Social Work, The University of Texas at Austin, 1925 San Jacinto Blvd, Austin, TX, 78712, USA. Electronic address:

Background: Spiritual/religious (S/R) interventions are commonly used to treat substance use problems, but this is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to examine their efficacy for these problems.

Methods: Ten electronic databases were searched to identify eligible studies (i.e., randomized controlled trials) published between January 1990 and February 2018 that examined S/R interventions' efficacy for substance use or psycho-social-spiritual outcomes. Two reviewers independently screened studies, extracted data, and assessed risks of bias. Robust variance estimation in meta-regression was used to estimate effect sizes and conduct moderator analysis.

Results: Twenty studies comprising 3700 participants met inclusion criteria. Four studies used inactive controls, 14 used active controls, and two used both inactive and active controls and were therefore included in estimating both absolute and relative effect sizes. The absolute effect of S/R interventions (compared with inactive controls such as no treatment) was moderate but non-significant (six studies, d = .537, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -.316, 1.390), possibly due to low power. The relative effect of S/R interventions (compared with other interventions) was statistically significant (16 studies, d = .176, 95% CI = .001, .358). Because only 12-step-oriented interventions were compared with other interventions, this finding does not apply to the relative effect of non-12-step-oriented S/R interventions. Moderator analysis showed that relative effect sizes differ significantly by country.

Conclusion: We found evidence of S/R interventions' efficacy in helping people with substance use problems. More high-quality efficacy studies of non-12-step-oriented S/R interventions for substance use problems are needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.04.045DOI Listing
September 2019

Cognitive behavioral therapy for primary care depression and anxiety: a secondary meta-analytic review using robust variance estimation in meta-regression.

J Behav Med 2019 Dec 19;42(6):1117-1141. Epub 2019 Apr 19.

Department of Sociology and Social Work, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai, China.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is well supported for treating depressive and anxiety disorders. Trials of CBT for anxiety and depression in primary care have increased over the past decade, yet only one meta-analysis, published in 2015, examined this topic and the scope of that review is relatively narrow. This study conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of primary care based CBT for depression and anxiety. A search of seven electronic databases, six professional websites, and reference lists from articles meeting inclusion criteria was conducted for studies published between 1900 and November 2018. Fifty-seven eligible studies (including 10,701 participants; 221 effect sizes) of randomized controlled trials were eligible and included for meta-analysis using robust variance estimation in meta-regression. Outcome indicators were depression and anxiety measures. An overall significant treatment effect, d = 0.400, 95% CI (0.235, 0.566), p < 0.001, of CBT for depression and anxiety disorders in primary care was identified. Subgroup analyses indicated significant treatment effect for: (1) depressive (d = 0.425, p < 0.001) and anxiety (d = 0.393, p < 0.01) outcomes, (2) studies conducted inside primary care (d = 0.412, p < 0.001), (3) studies using individual-based CBT (d = 0.412, p < 0.001), (4) studies without primary care physician involvement (d = 0.395, p < 0.001), and (5) studies using both tele-health (d = 0.563, p < 0.001) and in-person CBT (d = 0.363, p < 0.001). The percentage of White participants, treatment composition (CBT only versus CBT + other approaches), and treatment duration were significant moderators. Implications for clinical practice are discussed based on both moderator and subgroup analysis results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10865-019-00046-zDOI Listing
December 2019

Are There Gender, Racial, or Religious Denominational Differences in Religiosity's Effect on Alcohol Use and Binge Drinking Among Youth in the United States? A Propensity Score Weighting Approach.

Authors:
Audrey Hang Hai

Subst Use Misuse 2019 20;54(7):1096-1105. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

a Steve Hicks School of Social Work , The University of Texas at Austin , Austin , Texas , USA.

Background: Alcohol use/misuse is a prevalent health issue among youth and may lead to adverse consequences. Religiosity has been identified as a protective factor against alcohol use/misuse among youth. Identifying moderators in the religiosity-alcohol relationship has important implications for intervention development.

Objective: This study aims to examine whether gender, race, or religious denomination moderate the religiosity-alcohol relationship.

Method: This study overcame previous studies' limitations by using longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample and robust analytical methods (N = 1969). This study used the propensity score weighting method to control for a large number of confounders. Propensity score weights were estimated using Generalized Boosted Models.

Results: Findings indicate that gender and religious denomination might not moderate the religiosity-alcohol relationship, whereas racial difference was present. Among White youth, religiosity was found to have a buffering effect against alcohol use (average treatment effect [ATE] = -0.57, CI = -0.83, -0.32) and binge drinking (ATE = 0.54, CI = 0.38, 0.71). However, among non-White youth, religiosity was not found to have an effect on alcohol use (ATE = 0.08, CI = -0.31, 0.47) or binge drinking (ATE = 1.07, CI = 0.68, 1.64).

Conclusions: Findings suggest that preventions/interventions of youth alcohol involvement that are religiously based may not need to adapt their efforts based on youth's gender or religious denominations. More importantly, when addressing alcohol use/misuse issue among White American youth, religious and faith-based organizations, youth religious group leaders, and clergy should be included in the prevention/intervention efforts.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2018.1555598DOI Listing
March 2020

The effectiveness of four empirically supported psychotherapies for primary care depression and anxiety: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Affect Disord 2019 02 11;245:1168-1186. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Shanghai Children's Medical Center, China.

Background: Depressive and anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and detrimental in primary care settings. However, there are gaps in the literature concerning effectiveness and generalizability of empirically supported interventions and treatment of both depression and anxiety in primary care settings. The aim of this review is to systematically assess and meta-analyze the effectiveness of brief empirically-supported psychotherapies for treating depression and/or anxiety in primary care.

Methods: Seven electronic databases, five professional websites and manual search of reference lists were searched through April 2017 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of four psychotherapies treating primary care depression and anxiety: cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT), problem-solving therapy (PST), motivational interviewing (MI), and solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT).

Results: From an initial pool of 1140 articles, 179 articles were eligible for full-text review and 65 articles were included for final analysis. Sixty-five articles containing 198 effect sizes reported an overall treatment effect size of d = 0.462, p < 0.001. Single-predictor meta-regression indicated that marital status, treatment modality (individual versus group), and treatment composition were significant moderators. Multiple-predictor meta-regression discovered treatment setting (inside versus outside primary care) significantly moderated treatment effect, b = -0.863, p = 0.039 after controlling for other intervention characteristics.

Conclusion: Treatment effects were found for CBT and PST, both for depressive and anxiety disorders. Interventions delivered outside primary care settings were more effective than those within, individual treatment had greater treatment effects compared to group treatment, and both technology-assisted and in-person treatments were found to be effective.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2018.12.008DOI Listing
February 2019

Parent-based interventions on adolescent alcohol use outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Drug Alcohol Depend 2018 10 17;191:98-109. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Silver School of Social Work, New York University, 1 Washington Square North, New York, NY 10003, USA. Electronic address:

Background: The effects of parent-based interventions on adolescent alcohol use are unclear, including what factors moderate intervention effects. This study examines the effects of parent-based interventions on adolescent alcohol use and whether the treatment effects vary by participants' characteristics and intervention characteristics.

Methods: Eleven electronic databases and relevant studies' references were searched for eligible studies published before March 2017. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of any parent-based intervention for alcohol use outcomes among adolescents up to 18 years old were eligible for review. Two reviewers independently conducted screening, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment. Robust variance estimation in meta-regression was used to analyze treatment effect size estimates and to conduct moderator analysis.

Results: Twenty studies were included in the meta-analysis. The average treatment effect size across all drinking outcomes, with 44 effect sizes from 20 studies, was g = -0.23 with a 95% confidence interval [-0.35, -0.10] which is statistically significant. Parent-based interventions appreared to have larger mean effect sizes on adolescent drinking intention than binge drinking. Interventions targeting both general and alcohol-specific parenting strategies had larger average effect sizes than interventions targeting alcohol-specific parenting only.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis found evidence of parent-based interventions' efficacy in preventing or reducing adolescent alcohol use.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.05.031DOI Listing
October 2018

The Effectiveness of Using Neurofeedback in the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review.

Trauma Violence Abuse 2020 07 11;21(3):541-550. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Steve Hicks School of Social Work, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.

Neurofeedback is an innovative treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that is readily accessible to mental health therapists. As a widespread mental health concern with potentially devastating long-term consequences on psychosocial functioning, PTSD can also adversely impact biophysiological processes, particularly those related to the brain. Neurofeedback has shown promise in alleviating overall PTSD symptoms, including these underlying neurobiological consequences. Successful results have been found among clients with PTSD who have not been responsive to prior treatment modalities. While a strong base of clinical anecdotes and case studies supports its success in treating PTSD, intervention studies on neurofeedback have been critiqued for lack of rigor and poor methodological design. A current systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of neurofeedback in treating PTSD was conducted. Unlike prior reviews which emphasized neurobiological changes, this study was written for the mental health therapist and focused solely on behavioral outcomes. Ten studies met the criteria for inclusion in this review. Neurofeedback demonstrated salubrious results in at least one outcome measure for the majority of participants across all studies. Interpretations, however, are limited by wide discrepancies in sample sizes, study designs, outcome measures, and the extent of reported results. Future research in this area would benefit from prioritizing randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes and longitudinal follow-up results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1524838018781103DOI Listing
July 2020

Gender Differences in the Relationships among Young Adults' Religiosity, Risk Perception, and Marijuana Use: A Moderated Mediation Model.

Authors:
Audrey Hang Hai

Subst Use Misuse 2018 07 27;53(8):1377-1386. Epub 2017 Dec 27.

a The University of Texas at Austin Steve Hicks School of Social Work , Austin , Texas , USA.

Background: Studies show that religiosity is a protective factor against marijuana use. Given many religions' teachings to promote risk perception of substance use, risk perception possibly mediates the relationship between religiosity and marijuana use. Moreover, since males and females differ in religiosity, risk perception, and marijuana use, gender may moderate religiosity's indirect effect on marijuana use through risk perception and religiosity's direct effect on marijuana use. Despite substantial research on religiosity and adolescent marijuana use, little research has targeted the young adult population.

Objectives: This study is the first to investigate the conditional nature of religiosity's influence on marijuana use through risk perception among young adults in the U.S.

Methods: Using a nationally representative sample from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (N = 12,646), conditional process analysis was examined through significant test of the index of moderated mediation. Additionally, mediation analysis was conducted in male (n = 6042) and female (n = 6604) groups separately to further characterize the nature of the relationships.

Results: Religiosity's indirect effect on marijuana use through risk perception was found to be significantly different between males and females, while there were no gender differences in religiosity's direct effect on marijuana use. The indirect effect of religiosity on marijuana use via risk perception was significant among both males and females and was larger for females than males.

Conclusion: Prevention interventions for young adults' marijuana use that incorporate religiosity should emphasize factors related to risk perception and have a gender informed perspective. Direction for future research is provided.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2017.1409242DOI Listing
July 2018

Spirituality/religiosity's influence on college students' adjustment to bereavement: A systematic review.

Death Stud 2018 Sep 24;42(8):513-520. Epub 2018 Jan 24.

a Steve Hicks School of Social Work , The University of Texas at Austin , Austin , Texas , USA.

Bereavement is prevalent among college students and spirituality/religiosity may play an important role in their bereavement adjustment. This is the first systematic review to investigate the spirituality/religiosity's relationship with bereavement among college students. We searched 10 databases and screened 598 studies. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Findings suggested a favorable association of spirituality/religiosity with desirable bereavement adjustment outcomes (growth, spiritual wellbeing, and psychological wellbeing), but mixed association with undesirable bereavement outcomes (distress). We provided directions for future research to further investigate the complex relationship between spirituality/religiosity and bereavement and to refine the meaning-making coping model for the college student population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07481187.2017.1390503DOI Listing
September 2018