Publications by authors named "Aubrey Van Kirk Villalobos"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Predicting Breastfeeding Intentions: A Test and Extension of the Theory of Normative Social Behavior with African American Social Identity.

Health Commun 2021 Jun 9:1-13. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

College of Education, Wayne State University.

Breastfeeding is a health promoting social behavior but statistics suggest a persistent disparity of lower rates among African American mothers. The Theory of Normative Social Behavior (TNSB) explains when and how norms influence behaviors, but has produced inconsistent results with respect to proposed moderators group identity and injunctive norms (IN), limiting its predictive value in diverse cultural groups. Cultural norms are one of many influences on breastfeeding behaviors, yet little is known about their mechanisms of influence. The TNSB has not been tested in the breastfeeding context or within an exclusively African American cultural group. Given this knowledge gap, a survey of 528 African American mothers in the Washington, D.C. area was conducted to test the moderating effects of IN and subjective norms (SN) and social identity on the descriptive norms (DN) to intentions relationship as predicted by the TNSB. Structural equation modeling was used to show that when controlling for education and breastfeeding history, norms significantly predicted 26.4% of the variance in breastfeeding intentions. SN and DN interacted negatively to enhance breastfeeding intentions. Latent profile analysis using ethnic pride, collectivism, and religiosity scales detected four profiles of African American social identity. Social identity profile membership was a significant moderator on the DN to intentions pathway in the structural equation model. Profiles with the highest ethnic pride were significantly influenced by DN to intend to breastfeed. Implications from this study for public health intervention and communication messaging are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2021.1936750DOI Listing
June 2021

Breastfeeding in Context: African American Women's Normative Referents, Salient Identities, and Perceived Social Norms.

Health Educ Behav 2021 Aug 24;48(4):496-506. Epub 2021 May 24.

Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.

The purpose of this study was to describe social norms and salient social identities related to breastfeeding intentions among African American mothers in Washington, D.C. Five focus groups were held with 30 mothers who gave birth to a child between 2016 and 2019. Two coders conducted pragmatic thematic analysis. This study demonstrated that women hold different identities relevant to making infant feeding decisions, with mother being primary and race/ethnicity, age, and relationship status factoring into how they define themselves. Mothers drew their perceptions of what is common and accepted from family, friends, the "Black community," and what they perceived visually in their geographic area and heard from their health care providers. Mothers believed breastfeeding to be increasing in popularity and acceptability in African American communities in Washington, D.C., but not yet the most common or accepted mode of feeding, with some variability by socioeconomic status group. Implications for public health communication and social marketing are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10901981211014445DOI Listing
August 2021

Racism and Resistance: A Qualitative Study of Bias As a Barrier to Breastfeeding.

Breastfeed Med 2021 Jun 30;16(6):471-480. Epub 2021 Mar 30.

Department of Communication and Michigan AgBio Research, College of Communication Arts and Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA.

Nearly 75% of Black non-Hispanic babies born in 2016 ever breastfed. However, Black mothers still experience barriers to breastfeeding, perpetuating disparities in exclusivity and duration. Using data collected from five focus groups with Black mothers ( = 30) in Washington, District of Columbia during summer 2019, we critically examine the influence of institutionalized and personally mediated racism on breastfeeding. We also explore the counter-narratives Black women use to resist oppression and deal with these barriers. Themes surrounding institutionalized racism included historic exploitation, institutions pushing formula, and lack of economic and employment supports. Themes regarding how personally mediated racism manifested included health care interactions and shaming/stigma while feeding in public. At each level examined, themes of resistance were also identified. Themes of resistance to institutionalized racism were economic empowerment and institutions protecting breastfeeding. Themes of resistance to personally mediated biases were rejecting health provider bias and building community. There are opportunities for health providers and systems to break down barriers to breastfeeding for Black women. These include changes in clinical training and practice as well as clinicians leveraging their position and lending their voices in advocacy efforts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bfm.2020.0307DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8215417PMC
June 2021

Efficacy of the Competency-Based Oncology Patient Navigator Training.

J Oncol Navig Surviv 2018 Dec;9(12):519-524

Institute for Patient-Centered Initiatives and Health Equity, The George Washington University Cancer Center, Washington, DC.

Background: Patient navigators play a critical role in working across interdisciplinary cancer teams and guiding patient care throughout the cancer continuum. Training for cancer patient navigators is needed to increase navigator capacity to improve health outcomes, especially given the current climate of provider shortages and high healthcare costs.

Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of the competency-based online Oncology Patient Navigator Training: The Fundamentals, designed by The George Washington University Cancer Center to increase confidence among participants in training learning objectives, which align with patient navigator competencies.

Methods: We analyzed pre- and postlesson data from 671 learners who completed the training from 2015 to 2017 to assess changes in confidence across learning objectives. Questions were asked on a 5-point Likert scale (strongly disagree to strongly agree). We calculated summary statistics and compared pre- and postlesson scores using paired tests.

Results: Learners reported statistically significant ( <.001) improvements in confidence across all objectives, increasing from an average mean of 3.6 to 4.3. Learners who completed this training also reported high intention to implement new strategies/skills/information into practice (87.7%).

Discussion: The Oncology Patient Navigator Training: The Fundamentals was found to be efficacious in improving participant confidence, and learners intended to apply their training in practice. Further research on how effectively the training prepares participants for certification and for ability to perform navigation duties in practice is warranted.

Conclusion: This fundamental training for patient navigators increased learners' confidence on competency-based learning objectives.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6879008PMC
December 2018

Evaluation of the St. Jude Cancer Education for Children Program on Cancer Risk Awareness, Attitudes, and Behavioral Intentions Among Fourth-Grade Science Students: Comparisons Between Racially Identifiable/High-Poverty Schools and Racially Diverse/Affluent Schools.

J Cancer Educ 2020 04;35(2):380-387

George Washington Cancer Institute, 2030 M Street, NW Suite 4003, Washington, DC, 20052, USA.

The St. Jude Cancer Education for Children Program (SJCECP) aims to teach children about cancer and cancer control behaviors. During the 2012-2014 academic year, we conducted a pilot evaluation of the SJCECP curriculum to determine its impact on cancer risk awareness, attitudes, and behavioral intentions among fourth-grade students participating in the program. Nine local schools and 426 students from the Memphis area participated in the program evaluation. The results of this study show an increase in fourth-grade students' overall cancer risk factor awareness, attitudes, and behavioral intentions after participation in the intervention. The study also compared the mean change score for unaware students (e.g., those whose mean item score was < 3.5 on the pre-test) between students from racially identifiable/high-poverty schools (school group 1; six schools) and racially diverse/affluent schools (school group 2; three schools). Comparison of the mean change score for unaware students between school group 1 and school group 2 showed that increases in overall cancer risk factor awareness in school group 1 were higher than the increases of unaware students seen in school group 2; however, no differences between the changes in attitudes towards cancer risk factors and cancer control intentions and behaviors between the school groups were observed. We conclude that the SJCECP curriculum is successful in promoting cancer risk factor awareness, positive attitudes towards cancer risk factors, and increased cancer control intentions and behaviors among students at the fourth-grade level regardless of school demographics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13187-019-1476-3DOI Listing
April 2020

How the Comprehensive Cancer Control National Partnership shapes the public health workforce.

Cancer Causes Control 2018 Dec 6;29(12):1205-1220. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

National Association of County and City Health Officials, Washington, DC, USA.

This paper explores how, through its extensive network of partners, the Comprehensive Cancer Control National Partnership (National Partnership) has provided a robust array of trainings, learning institutes, webinars, workshops, mentorship programs, and direct technical assistance to comprehensive cancer control programs and coalitions over the past 20 years. Mapping these activities to specific cancer control competencies revealed that the efforts of the National Partnership adequately address the core competencies necessary for an effective workforce and have the potential to increase practitioner capacity to adopt and implement evidence-based cancer control programs. Ensuring the continued availability and uptake of these tools, trainings and partnerships could potentially address gaps and barriers in the public health workforce related to evidence-based practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-018-1110-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6779039PMC
December 2018

Communication and comprehensive cancer control coalitions: lessons from two decades of campaigns, outreach, and training.

Cancer Causes Control 2018 Dec 10;29(12):1239-1247. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, The University of Texas at Austin, 2109 San Jacinto Blvd. (D3700), Austin, TX, 78712-1415, USA.

Purpose: Comprehensive cancer control (CCC) coalitions and programs have delivered effective models and approaches to reducing cancer burden across the United States over the last two decades. Communication plays an essential role in diverse coalition activities from prevention to survivorship, including organizational and community capacity-building and as cancer control intervention strategies.

Methods: Based upon a review of published CCC research as well as public health communication best practices, this article describes lessons learned to assist CCC coalitions and programs with systematic implementation of communication efforts as key strategies in cancer control.

Results: Communication-oriented lessons include (1) effective communication work requires listening and ongoing engagement with key stakeholders, (2) communication interventions should target multiple levels from interpersonal to mediated channels, (3) educational outreach can be a valuable opportunity to bolster coalition effectiveness and cancer control outcomes, and (4) dedicated support is necessary to ensure consistent communication efforts.

Conclusions: External and internal communication strategies can optimize coalition efforts and resources to ultimately help produce meaningful improvement in cancer control outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-018-1122-0DOI Listing
December 2018

St. Jude Cancer Education for Children Program: The Impact of a Teacher-Led Intervention on Student Knowledge Gains.

J Cancer Educ 2017 Dec;32(4):808-813

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA.

In 2006, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (Memphis, Tennessee) began developing a school-based outreach program known as the St. Jude Cancer Education for Children Program (SJCECP). The aim of this program is to teach Memphis-area children about cells, cancer, and healthy habits that can prevent the development of cancer in adulthood. Initial plans for delivery of the program was for St. Jude staff to present the program at local schools. This plan for disseminating instruction was not feasible due to the limited availability of St. Jude staff. As a next step, during the 2012-2014 academic years, we conducted a study entitled SJCECP2, utilizing the SJCECP curriculum, with the objective of evaluating the impact of the educational intervention on knowledge acquisition and retention among fourth-grade students participating in a modified, teacher-led version of the program. Eighteen teachers and 426 students from 10 local schools in the greater Memphis area participated in the program evaluation. This study used a single-group, pre-test/post-test design to determine the impact of the SJCECP intervention on changes in knowledge scores among fourth-grade students. Testing was on cells, cancer, and healthy living. The mean scores increased from 6.45 to 8.12, 5.99 to 7.65, and 5.92 to 7.96 on cell, cancer, and health behaviors units, respectively (all p values <.001). Preliminary evidence suggests that the SJCECP2 intervention is a useful tool for teachers to improve student knowledge of knowledge of cells, cancer, and healthy living concepts at the fourth-grade level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13187-016-1010-9DOI Listing
December 2017

The St. Jude Cancer Education for Children Program Pilot Study: Determining the Knowledge Acquisition and Retention of 4th-Grade Students.

J Cancer Educ 2016 Mar;31(1):26-30

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA.

In 2006, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital began developing a school-based outreach program known as the St. Jude Cancer Education for Children Program (SJCECP). The program aimed to teach children about cancer and healthy habits that can prevent the formation of cancers into adulthood. During the 2010-2011 academic years, we conducted a pilot evaluation of the SJCECP curriculum, with the primary objective of evaluating the impact of the intervention on knowledge acquisition and retention among 4th-grade students participating in the program. Seven local schools and 481 students from the Memphis area participated in the program evaluation. The results of this study show that 4th-grade students are able to acquire gains in knowledge related to cells, cancer, and healthy living after receiving the SJCECP intervention. We conclude that the program can be a useful tool for improving knowledge of cancer concepts at the 4th-grade level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13187-014-0752-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4428987PMC
March 2016

Cure4Kids for Kids: preliminary results on evaluating knowledge acquisition and knowledge retention.

Stud Health Technol Inform 2012 ;172:120-8

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA.

Since 2006 St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has been developing Cure4Kids for Kids, a school-based outreach program to educate children about cancer and healthy lifestyles with a focus on cancer prevention. An evaluation of student knowledge acquisition and retention for the program at the Grade-4 level was conducted during the 2010-2011 school year. Preliminary results of this evaluation are outlined with some of the challenges for long-term program evaluation of cancer prevention programs.
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February 2013

Cure4Kids for Kids: school-based cancer education outreach.

Stud Health Technol Inform 2012 ;172:111-9

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA.

In 2006, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital created Cure4Kids for Kids, a school-based outreach program. The objectives of this community education program are to teach about cancer and healthy lifestyles and to inspire an interest in science and health-related careers. A multidisciplinary team of St. Jude and outside experts developed and pilot tested age-appropriate educational materials and activities with 4th grade students. Eight schools and more than 800 children have participated in the program since 2006. Teachers and students have demonstrated a very positive response to the program for it being both fun and educational. Cure4Kids for Kids resources have been collected into a teacher's kit and are now freely available online at www.cure4kids.org/kids.
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February 2013
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