Publications by authors named "Aubin Sandio"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Use of Dental Bisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate Composite to Repair Refractory Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks Associated With Large-Scale Anterior Skull Base Defects.

J Craniofac Surg 2021 Jul-Aug 01;32(5):1805-1809

Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Yaounde Central Hospital, Yaounde, Cameroon.

Abstract: Treatment of refractory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, particularly those associated with large skull base defects, is challenging. A variety of synthetic biomaterial-based systems have been investigated in experimental models and/or humans for reconstructing cranial base defects. A widely used dental composite (bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate [bis-GMA]) has been shown to be effective for reconstruction of anterior skull base defects in animal models. Here, we report 4 patients who underwent reconstruction of large anterior skull base defects (1405.8 ± 511 mm2) secondary to tumor resection and traumatic injury using the dental bis-GMA resin-based composite. A vascularized pericranial flap with fibrin glue was initially performed in all patients with concurrent use of dental bis-GMA during the primary surgery in 2 patients, and later use (in a repeat surgery) in other 2 cases. In these latter 2, CSF rhinorrhea persisted after the initial surgery (in the absence of bis-GMA use) despite external CSF drainage with lumbar drain. Following treatment with bis-GMA, rigid structural support and watertight closure of the defect were successfully achieved. At the follow-up, CSF leak did not recur and none of the patients had any complications related to the surgery or the composite. The results obtained from this series are promising, and dental bis-GMA resin seems to provide an effective and feasible material for the treatment and prevention of CSF leaks related to large-scale anterior skull base defects. However, further studies with longer clinical follow-up and larger number of patients are required to prove the safety and efficacy of this matrix in the long run.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000007568DOI Listing
July 2021

COVID-19 Symptoms Can Prolong Seasonal Flu Infection Symptoms and Recovery Times Among Obese African American Female Population.

SN Compr Clin Med 2021 Feb 25:1-5. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Bronx, USA.

According to several studies, obesity increases rates of metabolic syndrome plus other comorbidities like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. However, little evidence exists as to whether obesity assists in the prolongation of COVID-19 and seasonal flu-like symptoms especially among African American 55-74-year age groups. The purpose of this study is to show that COVID-19 symptoms can prolong recovery times and symptoms of seasonal flu-infected obese African Americans. The aim of the study is to investigate risk factors which include modifiable (i.e., obesity) and non-modifiable (i.e., age, race) effect on prolongation and recovery times for some inpatient COVID-19 and seasonal flu-infected African American from a single hospital in Detroit, MI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s42399-021-00823-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7905771PMC
February 2021

Prevalence, Predictors, and Outcomes of Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation After Endovascular Stroke Therapy.

Neurocrit Care 2021 06 21;34(3):1009-1016. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Department of Neurology, UT Health McGovern School of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.

Background: To investigate the rates, predictors, and outcomes of prolonged mechanical ventilation (≥ 96 h) following endovascular treatment (EVT) of ischemic stroke.

Methods: Hospitalizations with acute ischemic stroke and EVT were identified using validated codes in the National Inpatient Sample (2010-2015). The primary outcome was prolonged mechanical ventilation defined as ventilation ≥ 96 consecutive hours. We compared hospitalizations involving prolonged ventilation following EVT with those that did not involve prolonged ventilation. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences between groups. Clinical predictors of prolonged ventilation were assessed using multivariable conditional logistic regression analyses.

Results: Among the 34,184 hospitalizations with EVT, 5087 (14.9%) required prolonged mechanical ventilation. There was a decline in overall intubation and prolonged ventilation during the study period. On multivariable analysis, history of heart failure [OR 1.28 (95% CI 1.05-1.57)] and diabetes [OR 1.22 (95% CI 1-1.50)] was independent predictors of prolonged ventilation following EVT. In a sensitivity analysis of anterior circulation stroke only, heart failure [OR 1.3 (95% CI 1.10-1.61)], diabetes [OR 1.25 (95% CI 1.01-1.57)], and chronic lung disease [OR 1.31 (95% CI 1.03-1.66)] were independent predictors of prolonged ventilation. The weighted proportions of in-hospital mortality, post-procedural shock, acute renal failure, and intracerebral hemorrhage were higher in the prolonged ventilation group.

Conclusions: Among a nationally representative sample of hospitalizations, nearly one-in-six patients had prolonged mechanical ventilation after EVT. Heart failure and diabetes were significantly associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation following EVT. Prolonged ventilation was associated with significant increase in in-hospital mortality and morbidity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12028-020-01125-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7577519PMC
June 2021

Anatomical Variations That Can Lead to Spine Surgery at the Wrong Level: Part III Lumbosacral Spine.

Cureus 2020 Jul 28;12(7):e9433. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, USA.

Spine surgery at the wrong level is an undesirable event and unique pitfall in spine surgery. It is detrimental to the relationship between the patient and the surgeon and typically results in profound medical and legal consequences. It falls under the wrong-site surgery sentinel events reporting system. This error is most frequently observed in lumbosacral spine. Several risk factors are implicated; however, anatomical variations of the lumbosacral spine are a major risk factor. The aim of this article was to provide a detailed description of these high-risk anatomical variations, including transitional vertebrae, lumbar ribs, butterfly vertebrae, hemivertebra, block/fused vertebrae, and spinal dysraphism. A literature review was performed in the database PubMed to obtain all relative English-only articles concerning these anatomical variations and their implication in the development of lumbosacral spine surgery at the wrong level. We also described patient characteristics that can lead to lumbosacral surgery at the wrong level such as tumors, infection, previous lumbosacral surgery, obesity, and osteoporosis. Certain techniques to prevent such incorrect surgery were explained. Lumbosacral spine anatomical variations are surgically significant. Awareness of their existence may provide better pre-operative planning and surgical intervention, leading to avoidance of incorrect-level surgery and potentially better clinical outcomes. In addition, collaboration with radiologists and careful examination of patient's anatomy and characteristics should be exercised, especially in difficult cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.9433DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7450882PMC
July 2020

Higher Obesity Trends Among African Americans Are Associated with Increased Mortality in Infected COVID-19 Patients Within the City of Detroit.

SN Compr Clin Med 2020 Jun 30:1-3. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Internal Medicine & Pediatrics, DMC Hospital, Wayne State University, 4201 St Antoine, Detroit, MI 48201 USA.

As the city of Detroit raids itself of deaths by shifting from homicides, COVID-19 infection continues to harrow the city with more deaths. From March 19 to May 15, more Detroiters died in 2 months than were killed in 2 years of city homicides. African Americans or Blacks (highest-risk phenotypes) developing COVID-19 infection are more likely to die disproportionately. The confluence of diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and the higher prevalence of obesity among Blacks have provided the needed environment for viruses like COVID-19 to thrive and cause serious infections. The purpose of this study is to connect mortality rates from COVID-19 infection to increasing obesity trends among African Americans within the city of Detroit. Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS ver. 23. Results showed that the highest mortality rates among African Americans occurred more in the obese individuals infected with COVID-19 in the city of Detroit. Out of 1930 deaths from COVID-19 infections, 733 deaths were due to obesity alone in patients without reported comorbid conditions like diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Mortality rate for both male and female African Americans amounted to a total of 11.9%. Thirty-eight percent of reported COVID-19-infected African Americans were obese.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s42399-020-00385-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7324487PMC
June 2020

Anatomical Variations That Can Lead to Spine Surgery at The Wrong Level: Part II Thoracic Spine.

Cureus 2020 Jun 18;12(6):e8684. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Neurosurgery, Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, USA.

Spine surgery at the wrong level is a detrimental ordeal for both surgeon and patient, and it falls under the wrong-site surgery sentinel events reporting system. While there are several methods designed to limit the incidence of these events, they continue to occur and can result in significant morbidity for the patient and malpractice lawsuits for the surgeon. In thoracic spine, numerous risk factors influence the development of this misadventure. These include anatomical variations such as transitional vertebrae, rib variants, hemivertebra, and block/fused vertebrae as well as patient characteristics, such as tumors, infections, previous thoracic spine surgery, obesity, and osteoporosis. An extensive literature search of the PubMed database up to 2019 was completed on each of the anatomical entities and their influence on developing thoracic spine surgery at the wrong level, taking into consideration patient's individual factors. A reliable protocol and effective techniques were described to prevent this error. In addition, the surgeon should collaborate with radiologists, particularly in challenging cases. A thorough understanding of the surgical anatomy and its variants coupled with patients characteristic is crucial for maximal patient benefit and avoidance of thoracic spine surgery at the wrong level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.8684DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7370605PMC
June 2020

Anatomical Variations That Can Lead to Spine Surgery at the Wrong Level: Part I, Cervical Spine.

Cureus 2020 Jun 17;12(6):e8667. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Neurosurgery, Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, USA.

Spine surgery at the wrong level is an adversity that many spine surgeons will encounter in their career, and it falls under the wrong-site surgery sentinel events reporting system. The cervical spine is the second most common location in the spine at which surgery is performed at the wrong level. Anatomical variations of the cervical spine are one of the most important incriminating risk factors. These anomalies include craniocervical junction abnormalities, cervical ribs, hemivertebrae, and block/fused vertebrae. In addition, patient characteristics, such as tumors, infection, previous cervical spine surgery, obesity, and osteoporosis, play an important role in the development of cervical surgery at the wrong level. These were described, and several effective techniques to prevent this error were provided. A thorough review of the English-language literature was performed in the database PubMed between 1981 and 2019 to review and summarize these risk factors. Compulsive attention to these factors is essential to ensure patient safety. Therefore, the surgeon must carefully review the patient's anatomy and characteristics through imaging and collaborate with radiologists to reduce the likelihood of performing cervical spine surgery at the wrong level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.8667DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7370673PMC
June 2020

Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Stenosis Before and During the Era of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

Am J Cardiol 2020 07 9;126:73-81. Epub 2020 Apr 9.

Center for Heart Valve Disease, Heart and Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.

Recent positive results of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI) in clinical trials have sparked debate on whether TAVI should be first line for all patients with aortic stenosis. However, limited evidence exists on the clinical impact of TAVI on a national level. Using the national inpatient sample (NIS) of hospital discharges in the United States from 2001 to 2016, we evaluated the rate of AVR and associated in-hospital outcomes in pre-TAVI and TAVI era. Hierarchical mixed effect modeling was used to assess for trend and calculate risk adjusted estimates. Annual volume of AVR increased from 49,357 in 2001 to 100,050 in 2016 (103% increase). Compared with the pre-TAVI era, mean annual change in volume of AVR was higher in the TAVI era (+2.9% vs +9.4%, respectively, p <0.001). In contrast, rate of in-hospital mortality decreased from 5.4% in 2001 to 2.7% in 2016 (50% decrease). Compared with the pre-TAVI era, magnitude of mean annual change in mortality was higher in TAVI era (-4.0% vs -6.7%, respectively, p = 0.04). Unlike SAVR for which risk-adjusted rate for most outcomes seems to have plateaued, TAVI demonstrated significant improvement from 2012 to 2016 for mortality (4.6% to 1.8%), acute kidney injury (15.1% to 2.6%) and nonroutine home discharge (63.6% to 44.6%). However, no significant change in the rate of stroke (2.4% to 2.1%) and pacemaker implantation remained high (8.1% to 9.4%). Lastly, median length of stay was shorter for TAVI compared with isolated SAVR (3 vs 8 days, respectively). In conclusion, the adoption of TAVI has led to increase in volume of AVR for severe aortic stenosis in the United States with favorable short-term outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2020.03.038DOI Listing
July 2020

Racial/ethnic differences in the prognostic utility of left ventricular mass index for incident cardiovascular disease.

Clin Cardiol 2018 Apr 17;41(4):502-509. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.

Background: Evidence exists for racial/ethnic differences in left ventricular mass index (LVMI). How this translates to future cardiovascular disease (CVD) events is unknown.

Hypothesis: The impact of racial/ethnic differences in LVMI on incident cardiovascular outcomes could have potential implications for the optimization of risk stratification strategies.

Methods: Using the prospectively collected database of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) involving 4 racial/ethnic groups (non-Hispanic Whites, Chinese, Blacks, and Hispanics) free of CVD at baseline, we assessed for racial/ethnic differences in the relationship between LVMI and incident CVD using a Cox model.

Results: 5004 participants (mean age, 62 ± 10 years; 48% male) were included in this study. After an average follow-up of 10.2 years, 369 (7.4%) CVD events occurred. Significant racial/ethnic differences existed in the relationship between LVMI and incident CVD (P for interaction = 0.04). Notably, the relationship was strongest for Chinese (HR per 10-unit increase in LVMI: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1-2.8) and Hispanics (HR per 10-unit increase in LVMI: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.5-2.2). Non-Hispanic Whites demonstrated the lowest relationship (HR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5). LVMI values of 36.9 g/m , 31.8 g/m , 39.9 g/m , and 41.7 g/m were identified as optimal cutpoints for defining left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) for non-Hispanic Whites, Chinese, Blacks, and Hispanics, respectively. In secondary analysis of LVH (vs no LVH) using these optimal cutpoints, we found a similar pattern of association as above (P for interaction = 0.04). For example, compared with those without LVH, Chinese with LVH had HR: 5.3, 95% CI: 1.6-17, whereas non-Hispanic Whites with LVH had HR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2-2.1 for CVD events.

Conclusions: Among 4 races/ethnicities studied, LVMI has more prognostic utility predicting future CVD events for Chinese and Hispanics and is least significant for non-Hispanic Whites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/clc.22914DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6490106PMC
April 2018
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