Publications by authors named "Astrid Peschel"

6 Publications

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Kinetics of viscoelasticity in the electric double layer following steps in the electrode potential studied by a fast electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM).

Analyst 2021 Apr 5;146(7):2160-2171. Epub 2021 Feb 5.

Institute of Physical Chemistry, Clausthal University of Technology, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Str. 4, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany.

Changes in the viscoelasticity of the electric double layer following steps in electrode potential were studied with an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The overtone scaling was the same as in gravimetry (-Δf/n≈ const with Δf the frequency shift and n the overtone order). Changes in half-bandwidth were smaller than changes in frequency. This Sauerbrey-type behaviour can be explained with either adsorption/desorption or with changes of the (Newtonian) viscosity of the diffuse double layer. While the QCM data alone cannot distinguish between these two processes, independent information supports the explanation in terms of double layer viscosity. Firstly, the magnitudes of the frequency response correlated with the expected changes of the viscosity-density product in the diffuse double layer. With regard to viscosity, these expectations are based on the viscosity B-coefficients as employed in the Jones-Dole equation. Expected changes in density were estimated from the densities of the respective salts. Secondly, the explanation in terms of liquid-like response matches the kinetic data. The response times of frequency and bandwidth were similar to the response times of the charge as determined with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Rearrangements in the Helmholtz layer should have been slower, given this layer's rigidity. Kinetic information obtained with a QCM can aid the understanding of processes at the electrode-electrolyte interface.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d0an01965hDOI Listing
April 2021

Compressional-Wave Effects in the Operation of a Quartz Crystal Microbalance in Liquids:Dependence on Overtone Order.

Sensors (Basel) 2020 Apr 29;20(9). Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Institute of Physical Chemistry, Clausthal University of Technology, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Str. 4, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany, (F.M.).

The operation of the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) in liquids is plagued by small flexural admixtures to the thickness-shear deformation. The resonator surface moves not only in the transverse direction, but also along the surface normal, thereby emitting compressional waves into the liquid. Using a simple analytical model and laser Doppler vibrometry, we show that the flexural admixtures are stronger on the fundamental mode than on the overtones. The normal amplitude of motion amounts to about 1% of the transverse motion on the fundamental mode. This ratio drops by a factor of two on the overtones. A similar dependence on overtone order is observed in experiments, where the resonator is immersed in a liquid and faces an opposite planar wall, the distance of which varies. Standing compressional waves occur at certain distances. The amplitudes of these are smaller on the overtones than on the fundamental mode. The findings can be rationalized with the tensor form of the small-load approximation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s20092535DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7249204PMC
April 2020

Characterizing protein-protein-interaction in high-concentration monoclonal antibody systems with the quartz crystal microbalance.

Phys Chem Chem Phys 2017 Dec;19(48):32698-32707

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Protein Science, Birkendorfer Str. 65, 88397 Biberach/Riss, Germany.

Making use of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), concentrated solutions of therapeutic antibodies were studied with respect to their behavior under shear excitation with frequencies in the MHz range. At high protein concentration and neutral pH, viscoelastic behavior was found in the sense that the storage modulus, G', was nonzero. Fits of the frequency dependence of G'(ω) and G''(ω) (G'' being the loss modulus) using the Maxwell-model produced good agreement with the experimental data. The fit parameters were the relaxation time, τ, and the shear modulus at the inverse relaxation time, G* (at the "cross-over frequency" ω = 1/τ). The influence of two different pharmaceutical excipients (histidine and citrate) was studied at variable concentrations of the antibody and variable pH. In cases, where viscoelasticity was observed, G* was in the range of a few kPa, consistent with entropy-driven interactions. τ was small at low pH, where the antibody carries a positive charge. τ increased with increasing pH. The relaxation time τ was found to be correlated with other parameters quantifying protein-protein interactions, namely the steady shear viscosity (η), the second osmotic virial coefficient as determined with both self-interaction chromatography (B) and static light scattering (B), and the diffusion interaction parameter as determined with dynamic light scattering (k). While B and k describe protein-protein interactions in diluted samples, the QCM can be applied to concentrated solutions, thereby being sensitive to higher-order protein-protein interactions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c7cp05711cDOI Listing
December 2017

Probing the electrical impedance of thin films on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), making use of frequency shifts and piezoelectric stiffening.

Rev Sci Instrum 2016 Nov;87(11):115002

Institute of Physical Chemistry, Clausthal University of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld 38678, Germany.

Using a temperature-responsive polymer film as an example, it was shown that a conventional quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) can probe a sample's electrical properties in addition to its thickness and softness. The film's electrical impedance was accessed by alternating between the driving voltage being applied to the front electrode and the back electrode. The opposing electrode was grounded in both cases. In the first configuration, the electrical properties of the sample do have an influence on the resonance frequency because of piezoelectric stiffening. In the second, they do not. Using this scheme, it was monitored how the electrical impedance of a film composed of a mixture of poly-N-isopropylacrylamide and polyvinylalcohol changes when the film swells and deswells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4966247DOI Listing
November 2016

Lipid phase behavior studied with a quartz crystal microbalance: A technique for biophysical studies with applications in screening.

J Chem Phys 2016 Nov;145(20):204904

Institute of Functional Interfaces (IFG), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany.

Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is emerging as a versatile tool for studying lipid phase behavior. The technique is attractive for fundamental biophysical studies as well applications because of its simplicity, flexibility, and ability to work with very small amounts of material crucial for biomedical studies. Further progress hinges on the understanding of the mechanism, by which a surface-acoustic technique such as QCM, senses lipid phase changes. Here, we use a custom-built instrument with improved sensitivity to investigate phase behavior in solid-supported lipid systems of different geometries (adsorbed liposomes and bilayers). We show that we can detect a model anesthetic (ethanol) through its effect on the lipid phase behavior. Further, through the analysis of the overtone dependence of the phase transition parameters, we show that hydrodynamic effects are important in the case of adsorbed liposomes, and viscoelasticity is significant in supported bilayers, while layer thickness changes make up the strongest contribution in both systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4968215DOI Listing
November 2016

Coupled resonances allow studying the aging of adhesive contacts between a QCM surface and single, micrometer-sized particles.

Nanotechnology 2015 Dec 10;26(48):484001. Epub 2015 Nov 10.

Institute of Physical Chemistry, Clausthal University of Technology, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany.

Interparticle contacts and contacts between particles and surfaces are known to change over time. The contact area, the contact stiffness, and the contact strength usually increase as the contact ages. Contact aging is mostly driven by capillary forces, but also by plastic deformation. Making use of acoustic resonators, we have studied the stiffness of contacts between the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and individual, micrometer-sized particles adsorbed to the resonator surface. Studying single particles avoids ensemble-averaging. Central to the analysis is the coupled resonance, occurring when a surface-attached particle together with the link forms a resonator of its own. If the frequency of this second resonator comes close to one of the crystal's overtones, plots of shifts in resonance bandwidth versus overtone order display a resonance curve. This secondary resonance is caused by the coupling between the particle's resonance and the main resonance. One can read the frequency of the coupled resonance from this plot. Similarly, resonance curves are observed in plots of frequency and bandwidth versus time, if the contact stiffness varies smoothly with time. Because the coupled resonance is a characteristic feature, it is easily identified even in cases where frequency shifts of some other origin are superimposed onto the data. For the cases studied here, the links stiffened while they dried. Interestingly, the efficiency of coupling between the particle resonance and the main resonance decreased at the same time. This can be explained with an increase in the link's bending stiffness. The analysis highlights that a QCM experiment amounts to vibrational spectroscopy on surface-attached particles. Among the application examples is the adsorption and drying of a lycopodium spore. Clearly, the technique is also applicable to problems of bioadhesion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0957-4484/26/48/484001DOI Listing
December 2015