Publications by authors named "Astrid M L Oude Lashof"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Spondylitis as a Rare Manifestation of Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2021 02 16;73(2):294. Epub 2020 Dec 16.

Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.41565DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7898716PMC
February 2021

Serial measurements in COVID-19-induced acute respiratory disease to unravel heterogeneity of the disease course: design of the Maastricht Intensive Care COVID cohort (MaastrICCht).

BMJ Open 2020 09 29;10(9):e040175. Epub 2020 Sep 29.

Department of Intensive Care, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Introduction: The course of the disease in SARS-CoV-2 infection in mechanically ventilated patients is unknown. To unravel the clinical heterogeneity of the SARS-CoV-2 infection in these patients, we designed the prospective observational Maastricht Intensive Care COVID cohort (MaastrICCht). We incorporated serial measurements that harbour aetiological, diagnostic and predictive information. The study aims to investigate the heterogeneity of the natural course of critically ill patients with a SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Methods And Analysis: Mechanically ventilated patients admitted to the intensive care with a SARS-CoV-2 infection will be included. We will collect clinical variables, vital parameters, laboratory variables, mechanical ventilator settings, chest electrical impedance tomography, ECGs, echocardiography as well as other imaging modalities to assess heterogeneity of the course of a SARS-CoV-2 infection in critically ill patients. The MaastrICCht is also designed to foster various other studies and registries and intends to create an open-source database for investigators. Therefore, a major part of the data collection is aligned with an existing national intensive care data registry and two international COVID-19 data collection initiatives. Additionally, we create a flexible design, so that additional measures can be added during the ongoing study based on new knowledge obtained from the rapidly growing body of evidence. The spread of the COVID-19 pandemic requires the swift implementation of observational research to unravel heterogeneity of the natural course of the disease of SARS-CoV-2 infection in mechanically ventilated patients. Our study design is expected to enhance aetiological, diagnostic and prognostic understanding of the disease. This paper describes the design of the MaastrICCht.

Ethics And Dissemination: Ethical approval has been obtained from the medical ethics committee (Medisch Ethische Toetsingscommissie 2020-1565/3 00 523) of the Maastricht University Medical Centre+ (Maastricht UMC+), which will be performed based on the Declaration of Helsinki. During the pandemic, the board of directors of Maastricht UMC+ adopted a policy to inform patients and ask their consent to use the collected data and to store serum samples for COVID-19 research purposes. All study documentation will be stored securely for fifteen years after recruitment of the last patient. The results will be published in peer-reviewed academic journals, with a preference for open access journals, while particularly considering deposition of the manuscripts on a preprint server early.

Trial Registration Number: The Netherlands Trial Register (NL8613).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040175DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7526030PMC
September 2020

CT in relation to RT-PCR in diagnosing COVID-19 in The Netherlands: A prospective study.

PLoS One 2020 9;15(7):e0235844. Epub 2020 Jul 9.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Section Acute Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Introduction: Early differentiation between emergency department (ED) patients with and without corona virus disease (COVID-19) is very important. Chest CT scan may be helpful in early diagnosing of COVID-19. We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of CT using RT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 as reference standard and investigated reasons for discordant results between the two tests.

Methods: In this prospective single centre study in the Netherlands, all adult symptomatic ED patients had both a CT scan and a RT-PCR upon arrival at the ED. CT results were compared with PCR test(s). Diagnostic accuracy was calculated. Discordant results were investigated using discharge diagnoses.

Results: Between March 13th and March 24th 2020, 193 symptomatic ED patients were included. In total, 43.0% of patients had a positive PCR and 56.5% a positive CT, resulting in a sensitivity of 89.2%, specificity 68.2%, likelihood ratio (LR)+ 2.81 and LR- 0.16. Sensitivity was higher in patients with high risk pneumonia (CURB-65 score ≥3; n = 17, 100%) and with sepsis (SOFA score ≥2; n = 137, 95.5%). Of the 35 patients (31.8%) with a suspicious CT and a negative RT-PCR, 9 had another respiratory viral pathogen, and in 7 patients, COVID-19 was considered likely. One of nine patients with a non-suspicious CT and a positive PCR had developed symptoms within 48 hours before scanning.

Discussion: The accuracy of chest CT in symptomatic ED patients is high, but used as a single diagnostic test, CT can not safely diagnose or exclude COVID-19. However, CT can be used as a quick tool to categorize patients into "probably positive" and "probably negative" cohorts.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0235844PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7347219PMC
July 2020

Case report of delayed seroprotection rather than non-response after primary three-dose hepatitis B vaccination.

Vaccine 2020 01 21;38(2):112-114. Epub 2019 Oct 21.

Department of Medical Microbiology, School of NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

We describe a delayed hepatitis B seroprotection 12 weeks after the primary vaccination schedule in a 57-year-old male with smoldering multiple myeloma. Based on undetectable anti-HBs antibodies 6 weeks after the third vaccination, the index person was previously considered to be a hepatitis B vaccine non-responder. Because hepatitis B vaccination started in the 1980s, many hepatitis B vaccine non-responders have received a revaccination regimen. If more cases of genuine delayed hepatitis B seroprotection surface in patients with hematologic malignancies, delayed seroprotection should be considered before the commencement of hepatitis B revaccination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.10.022DOI Listing
January 2020

Ethnicity and response to primary three-dose hepatitis B vaccination in employees in the Netherlands, 1983 through 2017.

J Med Virol 2020 03 29;92(3):309-316. Epub 2019 Oct 29.

Department of Medical Microbiology, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Background And Aims: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination is recommended to all employees who have an occupational risk in the Netherlands. This study assessed the determinants of the immune response to primary standard three-dose HBV vaccination (0, 1, 6 months), with the main focus on ethnicity.

Methods: Out of 76 239 individuals who received HBV vaccination between April 1983 and December 2017, 11 567 persons with a known country of birth and complete vaccination schedule were included in this study. Weighted multiple logistic regression with Firth's bias adjustment was used to assess the determinants of nonresponse (anti-HBs < 10 mIU/mL) and low response (anti-HBs 10-99 mIU/mL).

Results: Baseline characteristics of the study population (n = 11 567) were as follows: mean age 27.5 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 27.23-27.72), 99.4% born in the Netherlands and 93.5% of Western European origin. Of all identified subjects, 180 (1.6%) were HBV vaccine nonresponders and 549 (4.8%) were low responders. When compared with individuals aged <40 years, the rate of nonresponse (4.3% vs 0.8%; P < .001) and low response (11.9% vs 2.9%; P < .001) was higher in those aged 40 years or older. The height of anti-HBs levels were lower in those subjects aged >40 years in comparison with those younger than 40 years, P < .001. All nonresponders were born in the Netherlands. Although no significant association was found between nonresponse and individuals of Western European origin (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.20; 95% CI, 0.66-2.44; P = .163), low response to HBV vaccination was significantly associated with Western European origin (aOR = 2.21; 95% CI, 1.41-3.86; P = .001). Significant determinants for nonresponse were older age at vaccination (aOR = 1.06; 95% CI, 1.06-1.07; P < .001) and male gender (aOR = 2.51; 95% CI, 1.97-3.22; P < .001).

Conclusions: The nonresponse rate was low in our study population. Our findings suggest that the vaccines being used for the primary vaccination are probably less immunogenic for older individuals, males, and persons of Western European origin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25610DOI Listing
March 2020

Invasive Aspergillosis Mimicking Metastatic Lung Cancer.

Front Oncol 2018 5;8:188. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC+), Maastricht, Netherlands.

In a patient with a medical history of cancer, the most probable diagnosis of an FDG-avid pulmonary mass combined with intracranial abnormalities on brain imaging is metastasized cancer. However, sometimes a differential diagnosis with an infectious cause such as aspergillosis can be very challenging as both cancer and infection are sometimes difficult to distinguish. Pulmonary aspergillosis can present as an infectious pseudotumour with clinical and imaging characteristics mimicking lung cancer. Even in the presence of cerebral lesions, radiological appearance of abscesses can look like brain metastasis. These similarities can cause significant diagnostic difficulties with a subsequent therapeutic delay and a potential adverse outcome. Awareness of this infectious disease that can mimic lung cancer, even in an immunocompetent patient, is important. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman with pulmonary aspergillosis disseminated to the brain mimicking metastatic lung cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2018.00188DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5996088PMC
June 2018

Global phylogenetic analysis of Escherichia coli and plasmids carrying the mcr-1 gene indicates bacterial diversity but plasmid restriction.

Sci Rep 2017 11 10;7(1):15364. Epub 2017 Nov 10.

Department of Medical Microbiology, Academic Medical Center (AMC), Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

To understand the dynamics behind the worldwide spread of the mcr-1 gene, we determined the population structure of Escherichia coli and of mobile genetic elements (MGEs) carrying the mcr-1 gene. After a systematic review of the literature we included 65 E. coli whole genome sequences (WGS), adding 6 recently sequenced travel related isolates, and 312 MLST profiles. We included 219 MGEs described in 7 Enterobacteriaceae species isolated from human, animal and environmental samples. Despite a high overall diversity, 2 lineages were observed in the E. coli population that may function as reservoirs of the mcr-1 gene, the largest of which was linked to ST10, a sequence type known for its ubiquity in human faecal samples and in food samples. No genotypic clustering by geographical origin or isolation source was observed. Amongst a total of 13 plasmid incompatibility types, the IncI2, IncX4 and IncHI2 plasmids accounted for more than 90% of MGEs carrying the mcr-1 gene. We observed significant geographical clustering with regional spread of IncHI2 plasmids in Europe and IncI2 in Asia. These findings point towards promiscuous spread of the mcr-1 gene by efficient horizontal gene transfer dominated by a limited number of plasmid incompatibility types.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-15539-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5681592PMC
November 2017

Flucloxacillin Results in Suboptimal Plasma Voriconazole Concentrations.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2017 09 24;61(9). Epub 2017 Aug 24.

Department of Pharmacy, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Combining voriconazole and flucloxacillin is indicated in patient cohorts experiencing both invasive aspergillosis and Gram-positive infections (e.g., patients with chronic granulomatous disease or postinfluenza pulmonary aspergillosis). We report a highly relevant interaction between voriconazole and flucloxacillin, resulting in subtherapeutic plasma voriconazole concentrations in more than 50% of patients, that poses a severe threat if not managed properly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.00915-17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5571297PMC
September 2017

Detection of the plasmid-mediated colistin-resistance gene mcr-1 in faecal metagenomes of Dutch travellers.

J Antimicrob Chemother 2016 12 23;71(12):3416-3419. Epub 2016 Aug 23.

Department of Medical Microbiology, NUTRIM School for Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands

Background: Recently, the first plasmid-mediated colistin-resistance gene, mcr-1, was reported. Colistin is increasingly used as an antibiotic of last resort for the treatment of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant bacteria, which have been rapidly disseminating worldwide in recent years.

Objectives: The reported carriage rate of mcr-1 in humans remains sporadic thus far, except for those reported in Chinese populations. We aimed to determine its presence in the faecal metagenomes of healthy Dutch travellers between 2010 and 2012.

Methods: Faecal metagenomic DNA of pre- and post-travel samples from 122 healthy Dutch long-distance travellers was screened for the presence of mcr-1 using a TaqMan quantitative PCR assay, which was designed in this study. All positive samples were confirmed by sequencing of the amplicons.

Results: The mcr-1 gene was detected in 6 (4.9%, 95% CI = 2.1%-10.5%) of 122 healthy Dutch long-distance travellers after they had visited destinations in South(-east) Asia or southern Africa between 2011 and 2012. One of these participants was already found to be positive before travel.

Conclusions: Our study highlights the potential of PCR-based targeted metagenomics as an unbiased and sensitive method to screen for the carriage of the mcr-1 gene and suggests that mcr-1 is widespread in various parts of the world. The observation that one participant was found to be positive before travel suggests that mcr-1 may already have disseminated to the microbiomes of Dutch residents at a low prevalence, warranting a more extensive investigation of its prevalence in the general population and possible sources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkw328DOI Listing
December 2016

Diagnosis and management of aspergillosis in the Netherlands: a national survey.

Mycoses 2016 Feb 9;59(2):101-7. Epub 2015 Dec 9.

Department of Medical Microbiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

A survey of diagnosis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis was conducted in eight University Medical Centers (UMCs) and eight non-academic teaching hospitals in the Netherlands. Against a background of emerging azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus routine resistance screening of clinical isolates was performed primarily in the UMCs. Azole resistance rates at the hospital level varied between 5% and 10%, although rates up to 30% were reported in high-risk wards. Voriconazole remained first choice for invasive aspergillosis in 13 out of 16 hospitals. In documented azole resistance 14 out of 16 centres treated patients with liposomal amphotericin B.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/myc.12440DOI Listing
February 2016

Risk stratification by abbMEDS and CURB-65 in relation to treatment and clinical disposition of the septic patient at the emergency department: a cohort study.

BMC Emerg Med 2015 Oct 13;15:29. Epub 2015 Oct 13.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Section Acute Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Background: Sepsis leads to high mortality, therefore risk stratification is important. The abbMEDS (abbreviated Mortality Emergency Department Sepsis) score assesses sepsis severity and predicts mortality. In community-acquired pneumonia, the CURB-65 (Confusion, Urea, Respiration, Blood pressure, Age) also provides support in clinical decisions regarding antibiotic treatment and clinical disposition. We investigated the predictive value and feasibility of the abbMEDS and CURB-65 in sepsis patients at the ED and the relationship between the scores and antibiotic treatment and clinical disposition (i.e. admission and type of ward).

Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, we included 725 sepsis patients at the ED. We investigated the value in predicting 28-day mortality and feasibility of both scores. We calibrated the abbMEDS. We further assessed the relationship between the three risk categories per score and antibiotic treatment (i.e. oral and intravenous narrow or broad-spectrum) and clinical disposition.

Results: Both abbMEDS and CURB-65 were good predictors of 28-day mortality (13.0%) (AUC 0.77 [95% CI 0.72 - 0.83] and 0.73 [95% CI 0.67 - 0.78], respectively) and feasible (complete score 92.7 and 93.9%, respectively). In the high risk category of the abbMEDS, all patients were admitted and treated with intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics. In the high risk category of the CURB-65, 2.5% were not admitted and 4.4% received no antibiotics.

Conclusion: Both abbMEDS and CURB-65 are good predictors of 28-day mortality in septic ED patients. The abbMEDS is well calibrated and matches current clinical decisions concerning antibiotic treatment and clinical disposition, while this is less so for the CURB-65. In the future, use of the abbMEDS at the ED may improve sepsis care when its value as a decision support tool can be confirmed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12873-015-0056-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4605126PMC
October 2015

High rates of antimicrobial drug resistance gene acquisition after international travel, The Netherlands.

Emerg Infect Dis 2014 Apr;20(4):649-57

We investigated the effect of international travel on the gut resistome of 122 healthy travelers from the Netherlands by using a targeted metagenomic approach. Our results confirm high acquisition rates of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase encoding gene blaCTX-M, documenting a rise in prevalence from 9.0% before travel to 33.6% after travel (p<0.001). The prevalence of quinolone resistance encoding genes qnrB and qnrS increased from 6.6% and 8.2% before travel to 36.9% and 55.7% after travel, respectively (both p<0.001). Travel to Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent was associated with the highest acquisition rates of qnrS and both blaCTX-M and qnrS, respectively. Investigation of the associations between the acquisitions of the blaCTX-M and qnr genes showed that acquisition of a blaCTX-M gene was not associated with that of a qnrB (p = 0.305) or qnrS (p = 0.080) gene. These findings support the increasing evidence that travelers contribute to the spread of antimicrobial drug resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid.2004.131718DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3966371PMC
April 2014

The first locally acquired human infection of Echinococcus multilocularis in The Netherlands.

J Clin Microbiol 2012 May 22;50(5):1818-20. Epub 2012 Feb 22.

Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

In the northern part of Western Europe, Echinococcus multilocularis is primarily detected in and spreading among foxes. The present case marks E. multilocularis as an emerging pathogen for humans, as it describes the first human case of probably locally acquired E. multilocularis in The Netherlands, with various interesting clinical aspects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.06355-11DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3347149PMC
May 2012

Ocular manifestations of candidemia.

Clin Infect Dis 2011 Aug;53(3):262-8

Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity, and Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Background: Ocular candidiasis is a major complication of candidemia. The incidence, risk factors, and outcome of eye involvement during candidemia are largely unknown. We prospectively studied the ocular manifestations of candidemia in a large, worldwide, randomized multicenter trial that compared voriconazole with amphotericin B followed by fluconazole for the treatment of candidemia.

Methods: Nonneutropenic patients with blood cultures positive for Candida species were assigned treatment with voriconazole or with amphotericin B followed by fluconazole in a randomized 2:1 ratio. Dilated fundoscopy was performed in each patient at baseline, on day 7, at 2 and 6 weeks after the end of treatment (EOT), and, if clinically indicated, at 12 weeks after EOT.

Results: Of 370 patients, 49 had findings consistent with the diagnosis of ocular candidiasis at baseline, and an additional 11 patients developed abnormalities during treatment, totaling 60 patients with eye involvement (16%). Of these patients, probable Candida eye infection was diagnosed in 40 patients (6 with endophthalmitis, 34 with chorioretinitis), and possible Candida eye infection in 20 (all with chorioretinitis). The duration of candidemia was significantly longer in patients with ocular candidiasis (median, 4 days; range, 1-18 days) compared with patients without ocular involvement (median, 3 days; range 1-26 days; log rank, P = .026). Therapy with either voriconazole (44 cases) or amphotericin B followed by fluconazole (16 cases) was successful in 65% of patients; outcome was not evaluable in 32% and was unfavorable in 3%.

Conclusions: Ocular involvement occurred in 16% of patients with candidemia; however, endophthalmitis was uncommon (1.6%). Treatment with either voriconazole or amphotericin B followed by fluconazole was successful for ocular candidiasis in most cases with follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/cir355DOI Listing
August 2011

Q fever (Coxiella burnetii) causing an infected thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm.

J Vasc Surg 2011 May 26;53(5):1402-4. Epub 2011 Jan 26.

Department of Vascular Surgery, Medical University Centre Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

We report a patient, which we believe is the first, with a thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm, Crawford type IV, caused by Q fever (Coxiella burnetii). Treatment consisted of antibiotic therapy started preoperatively and continued postoperatively and an open repair, including resection of the infected aneurysm, replacement with a rifampin-soaked polyester graft, and an omental wrap covering the grafts. After 13 months of follow-up, the patient had no signs of infection, and results of laboratory findings were normal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2010.11.102DOI Listing
May 2011

Design of efficacy trials of cytokines in combination with antifungal drugs.

Clin Infect Dis 2004 Oct;39 Suppl 4:S218-23

Department of Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Resolution of invasive fungal infections is often dependent on recovery from an immunocompromised state, which indicates that host defense mechanisms are extremely important in the clearance of fungal pathogens. Immunotherapy aimed at enhancement of host defense mechanisms may improve clinical outcome of invasive mycoses. The design of trials of immunotherapy against fungal pathogens requires profound knowledge of the host defense mechanisms that are involved in invasive fungal infections. Prospective phase II studies with recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interferon-gamma have been done. Recombinant interferon-gamma is a candidate for phase III trials of adjunctive immunotherapy for cryptococcal meningitis, invasive aspergillosis, and candidemia, but the proper design of future trials will be crucial to establish whether immunotherapy is of clinical value in the treatment of invasive fungal infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/421960DOI Listing
October 2004
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