Publications by authors named "Ashwaq Almajed"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Colorectal Schistosomiasis Infection After Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy for Recurrent Metastatic Colon Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report.

Am J Case Rep 2021 May 11;22:e930439. Epub 2021 May 11.

Department of Surgery, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

BACKGROUND Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in men and women worldwide. There are several studies showing an association between chronic schistosomiasis infection and colorectal cancer. CASE REPORT A 53-year-old woman presented with recurrent metastatic colon cancer involving the peritoneum and bilateral adnexa. The patient then underwent exploratory laparotomy that involved abdominal wall deposit resection, omentectomy, redo left hemicolectomy, peritonectomy, diaphragmatic stripping, and total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingectomy-oophorectomy, as well as hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). She also underwent adjuvant chemotherapy, but on her 6th cycle, the patient suffered intolerable anal pain, diarrhea, and rectal bleeding. Her colonoscopy showed extended circumferential inflammation with loses of vascular pattern and a few rectal ulcers going up to the anastomosis site. Biopsy revealed Schistosoma mansoni eggs and marked ischemic changes. She was then managed with a single dose of Praziquantel. CONCLUSIONS Colorectal schistosomiasis infection is a rare cause of such common presentations especially in postoperative settings in a patient with recurrent metastatic colon cancer. The use of multimodality investigations and high clinical suspicion were needed for the diagnosis and to exclude other common etiologies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12659/AJCR.930439DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8126586PMC
May 2021

Barriers of colorectal cancer screening test among adults in the Saudi Population: A Cross-Sectional study.

Prev Med Rep 2020 Dec 26;20:101235. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Prince Sattam Research Chair for Epidemiology and Public Health, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide. CRC can be completely cured if detected at an early stage with screening. However, many barriers to screening have been reported. This study aimed to identify the potential barriers to CRC screening among the Saudi population aged ≥45 years. A cross-sectional study of randomly selected adults (aged ≥45 years) attending primary care clinics at KKUH in Saudi Arabia was conducted. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. A total of 448 participants were included. In general, the most commonly reported barrier to CRC screening was a lack of physician recommendation (77.1%). Moreover, fear of painful colonoscopy procedures and a lack of knowledge regarding the availability of the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) were reported by 51.6% and 57.8% of patients, respectively. Significant gender differences were observed, with females reporting more barriers to CRC screening than males (general barriers [p < 0.001] and colonoscopy-specific barriers [p = 0.003]). Participants who had not undergone any previous CRC screening reported significantly more barriers compared to those who had undergone a previous CRC screening (general barriers [p = 0.015], colonoscopy-specific barriers [p = 0.006], and FOBT specific barriers [p = 0.024]) Because a lack of physician recommendation was the most commonly reported general barrier, we recommend that physicians emphasize the need for CRC screening, particularly to high-risk patients. Extensive campaigns and programs must be launched to raise awareness about the importance of screening for CRC. Additionally, gender-specific strategies need to be formulated to promote CRC screening in females.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2020.101235DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7645071PMC
December 2020