Publications by authors named "Ashok Lingappa"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Intra-observer and inter-observer variability in two grading systems for oral epithelial dysplasia: A multi-centre study in India.

J Oral Pathol Med 2020 Oct 9;49(9):948-955. Epub 2020 Jul 9.

Faculty of Dentistry, Oral & Craniofacial Sciences, King's College London, WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Cancer, London, UK.

Background: The presence and grading of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) are considered the gold standard for predicting the malignant risk of oral potentially malignant disorders. However, inter-observer and intra-observer agreement in the context of reporting on OED grading has been reputedly considered unreliable.

Methods: We undertook a multi-centre study of six Indian oral pathologists to assess variations in reporting OED using the World Health Organization (WHO; 2005) system and also the recently introduced binary system. The observer variability was assessed with the use of kappa statistics.

Results: The weighted kappa intra-observer agreement scores improved (κ  = 0.5012) on grouping by two grades as no and mild dysplasia versus moderate and severe dysplasia compared to binary grading system (κ = 0.1563) and WHO grading system (κ  = 0.4297). Poor to fair inter-observer agreement scores were seen between the principal investigator (PI) and the other five observers using the WHO grading system (κ = 0.051-0.231; κ  = 0.145 to 0.361; 35% to 46%) and binary grading system (κ = 0.049 to 0.326; 50 to 65%).

Conclusions: There is considerable room for improvement in the assessment of OED using either system to help in standardised reporting. The professional pathology organisations in India should take steps to provide external quality assessment in reporting OED among oral and general pathologists who are engaged in routine reporting of head and neck specimens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jop.13056DOI Listing
October 2020

Salivary levels of TNF-α in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis: A cross-sectional study.

J Dent Res Dent Clin Dent Prospects 2018 14;12(1):45-48. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

Professor and HOD, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a disorder characterized by recurring ulcers involving the oral mucosa in patients with no other signs of disease. The current concept of etiopathogenesis is that RAS is a clinical syndrome with several possible etiologies. The process seen in RAS is probably initiated through an as yet unidentified antigenic stimulation of the mucosal keratinocytes, which stimulates secretion of T-cell activation cytokines ‒ interleukins and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α causes inflammation by its effect on endothelial cell adhesion and neutrophil chemotaxis. The rele-vance of TNF-α to the pathogenesis of RAS has stemmed from the observations that anti- TNF-α drugs such as thalidomide and pentoxifylline have been found to be effective in the treatment of RAS. Therefore, the present study was an attempt to measure the levels of salivary TNF-α in patients with RAS, which will reflect the local production of cytokines at the site of the disease. The aim was to evaluate the salivary levels of TNF-α in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The study comprised of 60 subjects, of whom 30 clinically proven RAS patients of either sex were selected as cases and 30 healthy, age- and gender- matched subjects were selected as controls. After taking informed consent, 5 mL of unstimulated saliva were collected from both the study and control group subjects. Determination of salivary TNF-α levels was carried out by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and expressed in pg/mL. Statistical analysis of the RAS and control groups was carried out using unpaired t-test. Gender-wise comparison of salivary TNF-α levels in the study and control groups was carried out using one-way ANOVA. Mean salivary TNF-α levels were significantly higher in the RAS group compared to the control group (P<0.001). It was also revealed that the mean salivary TNF-α levels in females were significantly higher than in males in the study group (PP<0.05). It is fair to suggest that TNF-α plays a very important mediatory role in the pathogenesis of RAS and may play an important role in the search for a definitive treatment for the disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15171/joddd.2018.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5928473PMC
March 2018

Interventions for treating post-extraction bleeding.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2018 03 4;3:CD011930. Epub 2018 Mar 4.

Department of Oral Medicine and Oral Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Melaka-Manipal Medical College (Manipal Academy of Higher Education), Jalan Batu Hampar, Bukit Baru, Melaka, Malaysia, 75150.

Background: Post-extraction bleeding (PEB) is a recognised, frequently encountered complication in dental practice, which is defined as bleeding that continues beyond 8 to 12 hours after dental extraction. The incidence of post-extraction bleeding varies from 0% to 26%. If post-extraction bleeding is not managed, complications can range from soft tissue haematomas to severe blood loss. Local causes of bleeding include soft tissue and bone bleeding. Systemic causes include platelet problems, coagulation disorders or excessive fibrinolysis, and inherited or acquired problems (medication induced). There is a wide array of techniques suggested for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding, which include interventions aimed at both local and systemic causes. This is an update of a review published in June 2016.

Objectives: To assess the effects of interventions for treating different types of post-extraction bleeding.

Search Methods: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 24 January 2018), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 24 January 2018), Embase Ovid (1 May 2015 to 24 January 2018) and CINAHL EBSCO (1937 to 24 January 2018). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. We searched the reference lists of relevant systematic reviews.

Selection Criteria: We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated any intervention for treating PEB, with male or female participants of any age, regardless of type of teeth (anterior or posterior, mandibular or maxillary). Trials could compare one type of intervention with another, with placebo, or with no treatment.

Data Collection And Analysis: Three pairs of review authors independently screened search records. We obtained full papers for potentially relevant trials. If data had been extracted, we would have followed the methods described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for the statistical analysis.

Main Results: We did not find any randomised controlled trial suitable for inclusion in this review.

Authors' Conclusions: We were unable to identify any reports of randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effects of different interventions for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding. In view of the lack of reliable evidence on this topic, clinicians must use their clinical experience to determine the most appropriate means of treating this condition, depending on patient-related factors. There is a need for well designed and appropriately conducted clinical trials on this topic, which conform to the CONSORT statement (www.consort-statement.org/).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD011930.pub3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6494262PMC
March 2018

Estimation of Serum Butyryl Cholinesterase in Patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Cross-Sectional Study.

J Clin Diagn Res 2017 Jul 1;11(7):ZC59-ZC62. Epub 2017 Jul 1.

Professor and Head, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Introduction: Oral cancer is a major global threat to public health. It is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity in the modern era. Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) accounts for over 90% of the malignancies involving the oral cavity. The enzyme- Butyryl Cholinesterase (BChE) is proposed to have a role in cell proliferation, cell adhesion, cell differentiation, apoptosis and tumorigenesis. Few studies have been conducted for understanding the significance of serum BChE as a biomarker in oral cancer patients; however literature available is insufficient to arrive at a conclusion. There is a need of a simple, rapid, convenient, inexpensive and reliable biomarker of oral cancer. So, the present study is an attempt to estimate the level of BChE in oral cancer, prior to definitive therapy.

Aim: To estimate and compare the serum BChE levels in patients with OSCC with age and gender matched healthy controls.

Materials And Methods: The study comprised of 80 subjects, of which 40 biopsy proven OSCC patients of either sex were selected as cases and 40 healthy, age and gender matched subjects as controls. Estimation of serum BChE levels was done by colorimetric method using RANDOX RX Imola Auto-Analyzer. The statistical analysis between the OSCC group and the control group were done using unpaired t-test. Comparison between serum BChE levels and TNM stages of OSCC were done using Kruskal-Wallis Test. Comparison between serum BChE levels and histopathological grades of OSCC were done using Mann-Whitney U Test.

Results: There was statistically highly significant decrease in the mean serum BChE levels in the OSCC group compared to the control group (p<0.001). It was revealed that the serum BChE levels were further decreased in moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma than well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and the difference was statistically significant (p <0.05).

Conclusion: The decrease in the serum BChE level demonstrates that it as a simple, rapid, convenient, inexpensive and reliable biomarker for oral cancer. Our findings support the concept of role of BChE in apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation and its related link in the pathophysiology of oral cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2017/27127.10207DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5583859PMC
July 2017

Aggressive fibromatosis of the oral cavity in a 5 year old boy: a rare case report.

Pan Afr Med J 2017 18;27:47. Epub 2017 May 18.

Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology Bapuji Dental College and Hospital MCC B Block, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Fibrous tissue proliferations express a wide spectrum of histologic and morphologic variation in both infants and adults. This ranges from hypertrophic scar formation at one end to malignant fibrosarcoma at the other end of the spectrum. Aggressive fibromatosis is an intermediate tumor which is in proximity to fibrosarcomas. These are locally invasive and often recur after excision, but do not metastasize. Histologically, they are characterized by proliferating fibroblasts with little mitotic activity. Aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck region is not common, and very sporadically occurs in the oral cavity or jaw bones. Here we report a rare case of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in a 5 year old boy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2017.27.47.11739DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5554660PMC
September 2017

Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma involving the mandible: A diagnostic dilemma.

J Oral Maxillofac Pathol 2016 May-Aug;20(2):334

Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (LGFMS) is a distinctive variant of fibrosarcoma with a high metastasizing potential and is characterized by a long interval between tumor presentation and metastasis. LGFMS involving the maxillofacial region is a very rare entity with only six cases reported till date. LGFMS is characterized by its benign histological appearance, with spindle cells in whorling pattern, and collagenized and myxoid areas. The heterogeneous histological appearance makes the diagnosis challenging. Immunohistochemical staining has been reported by a number of authors, with some conflicting results, showing positivity with vimentin, but no immunoreactivity with antibodies to keratin, desmin, actin, S100 or epithelial membrane antigen. We present a case of a 35-year-old male patient who developed a mass on the left mandibular body region. The tumor was excised along with mental nerve at the level of the mental foramen. The tumor on pathologic and immunohistochemical evaluation was diagnosed as LGFMS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-029X.185914DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4989581PMC
September 2016

Interventions for treating post-extraction bleeding.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2016 Jun 10(6):CD011930. Epub 2016 Jun 10.

Department of Oral Medicine & Oral Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Melaka-Manipal Medical College, Jalan Batu Hampar, Bukit Baru, Melaka, Malaysia, 75150.

Background: Post-extraction bleeding (PEB) is a recognised, frequently encountered complication in dental practice, which is defined as bleeding that continues beyond 8 to 12 hours after dental extraction. The incidence of post-extraction bleeding varies from 0% to 26%. If post-extraction bleeding is not managed, complications can range from soft tissue haematomas to severe blood loss. Local causes of bleeding include soft tissue and bone bleeding. Systemic causes include platelet problems, coagulation disorders or excessive fibrinolysis, and inherited or acquired problems (medication induced). There is a wide array of techniques suggested for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding, which include interventions aimed at both local and systemic causes.

Objectives: To assess the effects of interventions for treating different types of post-extraction bleeding.

Search Methods: We searched the following electronic databases: The Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 22 March 2016); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 2); MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 22 March 2016); CINAHL via EBSCO (1937 to 22 March 2016). Due to the ongoing Cochrane project to search EMBASE and add retrieved clinical trials to CENTRAL, we searched only the last 11 months of EMBASE via OVID (1 May 2015 to 22 March 2016). We placed no further restrictions on the language or date of publication. We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (http://clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials (http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/default.aspx). We also checked the reference lists of excluded trials.

Selection Criteria: We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated any intervention for treating PEB, with male or female participants of any age, regardless of type of teeth (anterior or posterior, mandibular or maxillary). Trials could compare one type of intervention with another, with placebo, or with no treatment.

Data Collection And Analysis: Three pairs of review authors independently screened search records. We obtained full papers for potentially relevant trials. If data had been extracted, we would have followed the methods described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for the statistical analysis.

Main Results: We did not find any randomised controlled trial suitable for inclusion in this review.

Authors' Conclusions: We were unable to identify any reports of randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effects of different interventions for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding. In view of the lack of reliable evidence on this topic, clinicians must use their clinical experience to determine the most appropriate means of treating this condition, depending on patient-related factors. There is a need for well designed and appropriately conducted clinical trials on this topic, which conform to the CONSORT statement (www.consort-statement.org/).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD011930.pub2DOI Listing
June 2016

Prognostic potential of AgNORs in oral submucous fibrosis.

J Int Soc Prev Community Dent 2016 Mar-Apr;6(2):167-75

Department of Oral Pathology, Rajarajeswari Dental College, Bangalore, Karnataka, India.

Aim And Objective: The role of prognosis cannot be stressed enough, especially when it comes to potentially malignant lesions. The argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs), which is simple and cost-effective has been used in diagnostic and prognostic pathologies. This study seeks to identify the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) in oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), to correlate the AgNOR count with the histologic grade of OSMF, and to evaluate the prognostic potential of AgNOR.

Materials And Methods: The sample size consisted of archival paraffin blocks of 35 cases of varying grades of OSMF and 10 cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Normal mucosa samples served as controls for the study. AgNOR staining in accordance with the method of Smith and Crocker was performed and Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis.

Results: The results showed an increase in AgNOR counts with corresponding grades of OSMF, the count being least in normal mucosa and also an increase in AgNOR count with corresponding decrease in differentiation of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

Conclusion: AgNOR staining is a rapid and inexpensive procedure representing cellular proliferation that can be used to assess the nature of the lesion and therefore, the prognosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2231-0762.178746DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4820578PMC
April 2016

Research on curcumin: A meta-analysis of potentially malignant disorders.

J Cancer Res Ther 2016 Jan-Mar;12(1):175-81

Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Al-Badar Rural Dental College and Hospital, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Introduction: Turmeric has been described in ayurveda, and is referred by different names in different cultures, the active principle called curcumin or diferuloylmethane, has been shown to exhibit numerous activities. Extensive research over the last half century has revealed several important functions of curcumin. It binds to a variety of proteins and inhibits the activity of various kinases. By modulating the activation of various transcription factors, curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory enzymes, cytokines, adhesion molecules, and cell survival proteins. Various preclinical, clinical, and animal studies suggest that curcumin has potential as an antiproliferative, anti-invasive, and antiangiogenic, as a mediator of chemoresistance, chemopreventive, and as a therapeutic agent. Thus, curcumin a spice once relegated to the kitchen shelf has moved into the clinic and may prove to be "Curecumin." Methodology and Objectives: The focus of this publication is to provide research on curcumin with scientific publications on curcumin indexed in PubMed, Google J-Gate including systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCT's), observational studies, or case series reports for various potentially malignant disorders (PMD's) with special attention to studies on oral submucous fibrosis. This research will be valuable in terms of identifying opportunities to provide recommendations for future research, in terms of the populations to research, the types of interventions needed, the types of outcomes to be measured, the study designs needed, to initiate a pathway for a low-cost research plan for future clinical trials in this field with an emphasis on conducting studies in regions of the world where PMD's are prevalent.

Conclusion: There is a lacunae for scientific review of curcumin for PMDs specially on OSMF. Appropriate therapeutic interventions are needed for the initial, intermediate, and advanced stages of the disease. High-quality RCTs should be initiated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-1482.171370DOI Listing
December 2016

Morphometric evaluation of the frontal sinus in relation to age and gender in subjects residing in Davangere, Karnataka.

J Forensic Dent Sci 2016 Jan-Apr;8(1):57

Department of Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Objective: The main objective of the study was morphometric evaluation of the frontal sinus in relation to age and gender and to establish its forensic importance and application.

Materials And Method: The study group consisted of 200 subjects (100 males and 100 females) in the age groups 14-20 years, 21-30 years, 31-45 years, 45 years and above. Posteroanterior (PA) cephalogram radiographs were taken using standardized technique. The processed films were traced and frontal sinus pattern was established as per Yoshino's classification system.

Results: The mean values for length, width, and area of the frontal sinus were found to be higher in males as compared to females and area of frontal sinuses increase with age except in males who were 45 years and above. The left width, left area, and bilateral asymmetry in relation to gender was found to be statistically significant.

Conclusion: The morphologic evaluation of frontal sinus is a useful technique to determine gender and seems promising in personal identification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0975-1475.176945DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4799523PMC
April 2016

Evaluation of serum sialic acid, fucose levels and their ratio in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

J Int Soc Prev Community Dent 2015 Nov-Dec;5(6):446-50

Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, SEGI University College, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia.

Background: Detection of cancer at the early stage is of utmost importance to decrease the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Apart from the conventional biopsy, minimally invasive methods like serum evaluation are used for screening large populations. Thus, this study aimed to estimate serum levels of sialic acid and fucose and their ratio in oral cancer patients and in healthy control group to evaluate their role in diagnosis.

Materials And Methods: Serum samples were collected from 52 healthy controls (group I) and 52 squamous cell carcinoma patients (group II). Estimation of serum levels of sialic acid and fucose and their ratio was performed. This was correlated histopathologically with the grades of carcinoma. Statistical analysis was done by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test and unpaired "t" test.

Results: Results showed that serum levels of sialic acid and fucose were significantly higher in oral cancer patients compared to normal healthy controls (P < 0.001). The sialic acid to fucose ratio was significantly lower in cancer patients than in normal controls (P < 0.01). However, comparison with histological grading, habits, gender, and age group did not show any significant result.

Conclusion: The mean serum sialic acid and fucose levels showed an increasing trend from controls to malignant group and their corresponding ratio showed decreasing trend from controls to malignant group. The ratio of sialic acid to fucose can be a useful diagnostic aid for oral cancer patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2231-0762.169211DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4697227PMC
January 2016

Robinow Syndrome: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature.

Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015 May-Aug;8(2):149-52. Epub 2015 Aug 11.

Professor and Head, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Robinow syndrome is an extremely rare genetic disorder. Short-limbed dwarfism, abnormalities in the head, face, and external genitalia, as well as vertebral defects comprise its distinct features. This disorder exists in dominant and recessive patterns. Patients with the dominant pattern exhibit moderate symptoms. More physical characteristics and skeletal abnormalities characterize the recessive group. The syndrome is also known as Robinow-Silverman-Smith syndrome, Robinow dwarfism, fetal face, fetal face syndrome, fetal facies syndrome, acral dysostosis with facial and genital abnormalities, or mesomelic dwarfism-small genitalia syndrome. Covesdem syndrome was the name entitled for the recessive form previously. Here, we report a case of 8-year-old female with a autosomal recessive Robinow syndrome having skeletal and vertebral defects. How to cite this article: Soman C, Lingappa A. Robinow Syndrome: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):149-152.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5005/jp-journals-10005-1303DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4562051PMC
September 2015

Oral manifestations in transplant patients.

Dent Res J (Isfahan) 2015 May-Jun;12(3):199-208

Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Organ transplantation is a widely undertaken procedure and has become an important alternative for the treatment of different end-stage organ diseases that previously had a poor prognosis. The field of organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant is developing rapidly. The increase in the number of transplant recipients also has an impact on oral and dental services. Most of the oral problems develop as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or the procedure itself. These patients may present with oral complaints due to infections or mucosal lesions. Such lesions should be identified, diagnosed, and treated. New treatment strategies permit continuous adaptation of oral care regimens to the changing scope of oral complications. The aim of this review is to analyze those oral manifestations and to discuss the related literature.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4432601PMC
May 2015

Congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of face: case report and review of literature.

J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent 2015 Apr-Jun;33(2):156-60

Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Hemifacial hyperplasia is a rare condition causing unilateral enlargement of all tissues. We report a case of progressive facial asymmetry caused by congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face in a 6-year-old boy. The approach to diagnosis in our case is discussed along with a review of cases reported in the literature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0970-4388.155134DOI Listing
January 2017

An atypical presentation of Pindborg tumor in anterior maxilla.

Dent Res J (Isfahan) 2012 Jul;9(4):495-8

Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Pindborg tumor, the eponymous counterpart of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm that was first described by a Dutch pathologist Jens Jorgen Pindborg in 1955 and accounts for approximately 1% of all odontogenic tumors. Its origin as well as its malignant potential is controversial. This neoplasm is possibly of stratum intermedium origin and occurring predominantly in the mandible of adults. We hereby report a case of Pindborg tumor arising in the premaxilla which is seldom (9 out of 200 cases) documented in the scientific literature.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3491341PMC
July 2012

Esophageal changes in oral submucous fibrosis using fiber-optic endoscopy.

J Investig Clin Dent 2011 Feb 9;2(1):10-5. Epub 2010 Nov 9.

Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, S.J.M. Dental College and Hospital, Chitradurga, Karnataka, India Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere, Karnataka, India Department of General Surgery, Bapuji Medical Hospital, Davangere, Karnataka, India.

Aim:   The aim of this study was to determine the extent of esophageal involvement and the association between the clinical and functional stages of oral submucous fibrosis and esophageal changes in oral submucous fibrosis patients.

Methods:   Thirty of 35 biopsied patients with proven oral submucous fibrosis, and 20 patients with no evidence of disease, underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Biopsies were taken from upper third, middle third, and lower third of the esophagus and sent for histopathological evaluation. The esophageal changes in the clinical and functional stages were studied both endoscopically and histopathologically.

Results:   We found that most patients had blanching in clinical stage 2, functional stage B, and functional stage C. In most patients, blanching was found in the upper third of the esophagus, followed by the middle third and lower third. Fibrosis in the middle third of the esophagus was found in most patients.

Conclusion:   The present study concludes that oral submucous fibrosis is not only confined to the oral cavity, but also extends to the esophagus. We found that there is an inverse relationship between the opening of the mouth and esophageal involvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.2041-1626.2010.00037.xDOI Listing
February 2011

Determination of sex from tooth pulp tissue.

Libyan J Med 2010 Apr 1;5. Epub 2010 Apr 1.

Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Zliten Dental College & Hospital, Al Margeb University, Zliten, Libya.

Objective: This study was carried out to determine the reliability of sex determination from teeth pulp tissue.

Patients And Methods: This study was carried on 60 maxillary and mandibular premolars and permanent molars (30 male teeth and 30 female teeth) which were indicated for extraction. The teeth were categorized into three groups of 20 each (10 from males and 10 from females).Group 1-pulp tissue from teeth examined immediately after extraction. Group 2- and Group 3-pulp tissue examined from teeth one and five month after extraction, respectively. Teeth was sectioned and pulpal cells were stained with quinacrine dihydrochloride. The cells were observed with fluorescent microscope for fluorescent body. Gender was determined by identification of Y chromosome fluorescence in dental pulp.

Results: Freshly extracted teeth and for those examined one month later, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and efficiency were all 100%.

Conclusion: The fluorescent Y body test is shown to be a reliable, simple, and cost-effective technique for gender identification in the immediate postmortem period up to one month.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/ljm.v5i0.5084DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3071175PMC
April 2010
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