Publications by authors named "Ashley S Fournier-Goodnight"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Disseminability of computerized cognitive training: Performance across coaches.

Appl Neuropsychol Child 2019 Apr-Jun;8(2):113-122. Epub 2017 Nov 21.

b Department of Psychology , St. Jude Children's Research Hospital , Memphis , Tennessee.

Cogmed is a computerized cognitive intervention utilizing coaches who receive standardized instruction in analyzing training indices and tailoring feedback to remotely monitor participant's performance. The goal of this study was to examine adherence, satisfaction, and efficacy of Cogmed across coaches. Survivors of pediatric brain tumors and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (N = 68) were randomized to intervention (Cogmed) or waitlist control. The intervention group was matched with one of two coaches. Cognitive assessments were completed before and after intervention, and participants and caregivers in the intervention group completed satisfaction surveys. T-tests showed no differences in adherence across coaches (number of sessions completed p = .38; d = .32). Noninferiority statistics were not consistently equivalent for satisfaction, but equivalence was supported for caregiver perceptions of pragmatic utility and participant perceptions of logistical ease of Cogmed. Equivalence was not consistently suggested for cognitive outcomes, but was supported on measures tapping relevant cognitive domains (attention, working memory, processing speed, academic fluency). This study suggests adherence can be maintained across coaches. While aspects of satisfaction and cognitive outcomes were equivalent, the possible influence of coach-based variables cannot be ruled out. Findings highlight challenges in standardizing the coaching component of multicomponent computerized interventions and the need for ongoing research to establish dessiminability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21622965.2017.1394853DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5962364PMC
September 2019

Neurocognitive functioning in pediatric craniopharyngioma: performance before treatment with proton therapy.

J Neurooncol 2017 Aug 24;134(1):97-105. Epub 2017 May 24.

Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Mail Stop 740, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA.

The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of patient-, disease-, and treatment-related variables upon neurocognitive outcomes in pediatric patients with craniopharyngioma prior to treatment with proton therapy or observation after radical resection. For all participants (N = 104), relevant clinical and demographic variables were attained and neurocognitive evaluations completed prior to irradiation or planned observation. One-sample t-tests were conducted to compare performance to published normative data. Linear models were used to investigate predictors of performance on measures where performance was below normative expectations. Participants showed poorer performance in comparison to the normative group across neurocognitive domains including executive functions (e.g., working memory; Wechsler Digit Span Backward p = 0.03), learning and memory (e.g., California Verbal Learning Test [CVLT] Total T p = 0.00), and fine-motor coordination (e.g., Grooved Pegboard Dominant Hand p = 0.00). Poor performance across areas was predicted by presurgical hypothalamic involvement (e.g., Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function Working Memory Index Grade 2 β = -7.68, p = 0.03; CVLT Total T Grade 2 β = 7.94, p = 0.04; Grade 3 β = -9.80, p = 0.00), extent of surgery (e.g., CVLT Total T Resection β = -7.77, p = 0.04; Grooved Pegboard Dominant Hand β = -1.58, p = 0.04), and vision status (e.g., CVLT Total T Reduced vision without impairment β = -10.01, p = 0.02; Grooved Pegboard Dominant Hand Bilateral field defect β = -1.45, p = 0.01; Reduced vision without impairment β = -2.30, p = 0.00). This study demonstrated that patients with craniopharyngioma show weaker neurocognitive performance in comparison to the normative population resulting from tumor, events leading to diagnosis, and early surgical intervention. Systematic investigation of neurocognitive performance before treatment with radiation therapy is essential to evaluating the potential risks and benefits of newer methods of radiation therapy including proton therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11060-017-2492-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5544542PMC
August 2017

Preliminary neurocognitive outcomes in Jeavons syndrome.

Epilepsy Behav 2015 Nov 6;52(Pt A):260-3. Epub 2015 Nov 6.

Jane and John Justin Neurosciences Center, Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA.

Jeavons syndrome (JS, eyelid myoclonia with absences [EMA]) consists of a triad of symptoms including eyelid myoclonia that may be accompanied by absence seizures, eye closure-induced EEG paroxysms or seizures, and photosensitivity. The age of onset ranges between 2 and 14 years with symptoms peaking between 6 and 8 years of age. Though investigation of the clinical, EEG, and neurological features of JS has occurred, neurocognitive functioning has not been well-delineated despite suggestion that a subtype of the syndrome is characterized in part by cognitive impairment. The purpose of this study was to define neurocognitive functioning in a more detailed manner by examining global IQ and relevant neurocognitive domains (i.e., verbal and nonverbal reasoning, attention, executive functioning, memory) in pediatric patients. The sample (N=6, 4 females) ranged in age from 8 to 15 years (M=11, SD=2.82). All participants completed neuropsychological evaluations. Statistical analyses revealed performance that was below average on measures of global IQ, processing speed and rote, verbal learning coupled with average nonverbal reasoning, and sustained attention. There was also evidence of impaired higher-level verbal reasoning. While global IQ ranged from low average to borderline impaired, no participant could be accurately described as impaired or having intellectual disability (ID) given the consistently average performance noted on some higher-order tasks including nonverbal reasoning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.09.022DOI Listing
November 2015