Publications by authors named "Ashkan Rasouli-Saravani"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Immunometabolism in human brucellosis: An emerging field of investigation.

Microb Pathog 2021 Sep 28;158:105115. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; Research Center for Molecular Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Electronic address:

In recent years, extreme attention has been focused on the role of immunometabolism in the regulation of immune cell responses in healthy individuals during infection, autoimmunity, and cancer. In the infection biology area, it has been shown that there is a close relationship between the immune system and the host metabolic changes. Brucella species is an intracellular coccobacillus that infects humans and mammals, which led to brucellosis. Brucella species with host-specific evolutionary mechanisms allow it to hide from or manipulate cellular immunity and achieve intracellular persistence. Intracellular bacterial pathogens such as Brucella species also employ host cell resources to replicate and persist inside the host. Targeting these host systems is one promising strategy for developing novel antimicrobials to tackle intracellular infections. This study will summarize the role of metabolic reprogramming in immune cells and their relationship to brucellosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2021.105115DOI Listing
September 2021

HLA-DRB1*04 may predict the severity of disease in a group of Iranian COVID-19 patients.

Hum Immunol 2021 Jul 13. Epub 2021 Jul 13.

Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Electronic address:

Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes with extreme diversity can make a contribution for individual variations to the immune response against SARS-COV-2 infection. This study aimed to explore the distributions of HLA class II alleles frequencies and their relations with disease severity in a group of Iranian COVID-19 patients. This prospective and case-control study was conducted on 144 COVID-19 patients including 46 cases with moderate form, 54 cases with severe and 44 cases with critical disease. HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 allele families were determined by PCR-SSP method and compared between three groups of the patients and in comparison to 153 ethnic-matched healthy controls. The patients group showed lower frequencies of HLA-DRB1*15 (OR = 0.57, P = 0.06), DRB1*15 ~ DQB1*05 haplotype (P = 0.04) and DRB1*15/DRB1*04 genotype (P = 0.04) in compare with healthy controls. Moderate COVID-19 patients had higher frequencies of HLA-DRB1*04 (P = 0.03), HLA-DRB1*10 (P = 0.05) and DRB1*04/DRB1*11 genotype (P = 0.01). Also, a higher significantly frequency of HLA-DRB1*03 allele group was observed in the critical patients versus controls (P = 0.01). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of DRB1*04 allele group was negatively associated with development of severe and critical disease (OR: 0.289, P = 0.005). Our results indicate a possible contribution of some HLA class II alleles in disease severity and clinical features of COVID-19 disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humimm.2021.07.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8275473PMC
July 2021

The pathogenic, therapeutic and diagnostic role of exosomal microRNA in the autoimmune diseases.

J Neuroimmunol 2021 Sep 24;358:577640. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Virology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Exosomes are a nano-vesicle surrounded by a bilipid layer that can release from almost all cells and could be detected in tissues and biological liquids. These vesicles contain lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids (including DNA, mRNA, and miRNA) inside and on the exosomes' surface constitute their content. Exosomes can transfer their cargo into the recipient cell, which can modify recipient cells' biological activities. Recently it has been deciphering that the miRNA pattern of exosomes reveals the cellular pathophysiological situation and modifies various biological processes. Increasing data regarding exosomes highlights that the exosomes and their cargo, especially miRNAs, are implicated in the pathophysiology of various disorders, such as autoimmune disease. The current evidence on the deciphering of mechanisms in which exosomal miRNAs contributed to autoimmunity was indicated that exosomal miRNA might hold information that can reprogram the function of many of the immune cells involved in autoimmune diseases' pathogenesis. In the present study, we summarized the pathogenic role of exosomal miRNAs in several autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis (MG), psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), type 1 diabetes (T1D), multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjogren's Syndrome (SS), systemic sclerosis (SSc), vitiligo, and autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Moreover, in this work, we present evidence of the potential role of exosomal miRNAs as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in autoimmune diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneuroim.2021.577640DOI Listing
September 2021

Relevance of autoantibody profile with HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 alleles in a group of Iranian systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

Immunol Lett 2021 Sep 26;237:11-16. Epub 2021 Jun 26.

Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; d. Psoriasis Research Center, Department of Dermatology, Farshchian Hospital, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.. Electronic address:

Background: One of the most relevant genetic components in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene complex which plays a central role in autoimmune responses. This study aimed to explore the associations of HLA-DRB1/-DQB1 alleles and haplotypes with SLE risk and the appearance of autoantibodies in SLE disease.

Methods: A total of 127 SLE patients and 153 ethnically matched healthy controls were enrolled. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles were determined by PCR-SSP method and then HLA alleles and haplotypes frequencies were compared between two groups and among the patients in terms of autoantibodies spectrum.

Results: We found that HLA-DRB1*03 and HLA-DRB1*16 alleles were significantly associated with increased risk (P = 0.008, P=0.05 and P = 0.002, P=0.02 respectively) and DRB1*01 conferred a potential protective role for disease (P = 0.03, P=0.13). Similar associations were observed at haplotype level; DRB1*03~DQB1*02 (OR1.91,P = 0.01, P=0.08), DRB1*16~DQB1*05 (OR3.65,P = 0.004,P=0.06) and DRB1*01~DQB1*05 (OR0.36,P = 0.04, P=0.22). Remarkably, we observed significantly associations of DRB1*03 with the appearance of anti-SSA/Ro (P=0.02), anti-SSB/La (P=0.002) and anti-coagulant (P = 0.007), DRB1*15 with anti-SSA/Ro (P=0.04), DRB1*16 with anti-Sm (P=0.02), DRB1*04 with anti-β2gpI (P=3 * 10), anti-cardiolipin (P = 0.002) and rheumatoid factor (P = 0.004) and DRB1*13 with anti-Sm (P=0.02) and anti-β2gpI (P=0.01) antibodies. Also, negative associations of DRB1*04 with anti-Sm, anti-SSA/Ro, DQB1*03 with anti-Sm and DRB1*11 with anti-Sm and anti-β2gpI were observed.

Conclusions: We identified DRB1*03 and DRB1*16 as risk alleles and DRB1*01 as a potential protective allele for SLE disease. More importantly, we found a close link between genetic susceptibility for SLE and autoantibodies status that was more evident for DRB1*03 allele.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.imlet.2021.06.004DOI Listing
September 2021

Clinical Relevance of HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 Alleles in Iranian Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients.

Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2021 Feb 11;20(1):67-75. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran AND Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis Research Center, Farshchian Hospital, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

Given the potential link between genetic risk factors and clinical features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), this study aimed to explore the relationship between human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1/DQB1 alleles and haplotypes and clinical sub-phenotypes of the disease in a group of Iranian SLE patients. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles were determined by PCR-SSP in 127 SLE patients and 153 ethnically-matched healthy controls. The relationships between various clinical manifestations and HLA alleles/haplotypes were analyzed in the patients. We observed the positive associations of DRB1*07 and DRB1*07-DQB1*02 haplotypes with articular and pulmonary involvement (p=0.006 and p<0.001 respectively), DRB1*03 and DQB1*02 alleles, and DRB1*03-DQB1*02 haplotypes with cutaneous (p=0.03, p=0.004 and p=0.02 respectively) and renal involvement, and DRB1*13 as well as DRB1*13-DQB1*06 haplotypes with renal involvement. Conversely, negative associations of DRB1*13 with cutaneous and gastrointestinal disorders (p=0.004 and p=0.02 respectively) and DRB1*01 with renal involvement (p=0.03) were found in our patients. Patients carrying susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles had a higher risk for expression of cutaneous involvement (p=0.03), anti-coagulant antibody development (p=0.01), and a lower risk for pulmonary disorders compared to patients' negatives for susceptible alleles (p=0.04). Our findings on associations between HLA risk allele (DRB1*03) as well as non-risk alleles with particular clinical manifestations and between the potentially protective allele (DRB1*01) and protection against renal involvement indicate the important role of HLA class II genes in predisposing of specific serological and clinical features of SLE disease which could be implicative for therapeutic applications and better management of SLE patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18502/ijaai.v20i1.5413DOI Listing
February 2021
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