Publications by authors named "Ashenafi Habte Woyessa"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Predictors of Health-Care Workers' Unwillingness to Continue Working During the Peak of COVID-19 in Western Ethiopia: An Extended Parallel-Process Model Study.

Risk Manag Healthc Policy 2021 17;14:1165-1173. Epub 2021 Mar 17.

Department of Public Health, Institute of Health Science, Wollega University, Nekemte, Oromia, Ethiopia.

Purpose: Willingness to work in disasters is context-specific and corresponds to the nature, magnitude, and threats posed by a particular public health emergency. None us is certain that our health professionals will continue to provide service should the COVID-19 pandemic crisis climb to its worst level. It was with this uncertainty in mind that this study was done to assess predictors of the unwillingness of health-care workers (HCWs) to continue providing their professional services during the climax of the COVID-19 crisis.

Methods: This was a facility-based descriptive cross-sectional study undertaken among 633 HCWsin western Ethiopia.

Results: Overall, 205 (32.4%) providers said that they would be unwilling to continue work if COVID-19 peaked. Of these, 176 (27.9%) respondents reported that they would stop going in to work before they were at greatest risk. Statistical analysis performed to predict HCWs unwillingness' to continue work at peak COVID-19 showed male sex (AOR 11.4, 95% CI 8.32-12.6), younger age (AOR 25.3, 95% CI 4.61-40.67), lack of experience in handling similar pandemics (AOR 5.15, 95% CI 1.1-255), and low perceived level of hospital preparedness (AOR 2.05, 95% CI 0.80-5.21) were predictors of unwillingness. In accordance with the extended parallel-process model, higher threat perception (P≤0.001) and low efficacy perception (≤0.040) were associated with unwillingness of the HCWs to continue working.

Conclusion: The proportion of HCWs unwilling to continue their job during COVID-19 is sufficient to affect efforts tof fight the pandemic. As the question of whether our HCWs must risk themselves to treat COVID-19 patients does not have a uniform answer, working on predictors of potential unwillingness is of paramount importance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/RMHP.S288003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7982702PMC
March 2021

Patterns of road traffic accident, nature of related injuries, and post-crash outcome determinants in western Ethiopia - a hospital based study.

Afr J Emerg Med 2021 Mar 5;11(1):123-131. Epub 2020 Oct 5.

Wollega University, Institute of Health Science, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Nursing, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Introduction: Ethiopia is one of the countries with the worst road traffic accident records in the world and it ranks second among east African countries. There have not been sufficient studies that mainly reflect the post-crash determinants of deaths and this study was therefore done to assess the overall nature of injuries and the post-crash outcome determinants of road the traffic accident in western part of Ethiopia.

Methods: This was a hospital-based prospective study conducted from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2019 using an area sampling technique. Five administrative zones in west Ethiopia were initially selected as a geographical cluster; out of which, four zones were randomly selected. Then, a total of four hospitals were conveniently selected. Finally, 327 people injured in road traffic accidents and brought to the selected hospitals were consecutively included.

Results: Overall, 189 (66.1%) of the casualties have sustained multiple injuries and 65 (24.0%) of them have got severe injuries. About 38.8% and 13.6% have respectively died and discharged with permanent disabilities. A longer distance from receiving hospital (AOR: 1.4, 95% CI [0.48-4.08]), singleness in the number of injury (AOR: 4.3, 95% CI [2.08-9.8]), and lack of receiving pre-hospital care (AOR: 4.072, 95% CI [1.197-13.85]) had statistical associations with increased number of death On the other hand, injured people who were taken to the hospitals by police officers (AOR: 0.371, 95% CI [0.160-0.860]) than emergency medical technicians and those who were transported by other vehicles (AOR: 2. 58, 95% CI [1.21-5.52]) than ambulance have ironically survived more.

Conclusion: This study concludes that the road traffic accidents related deaths occur largely due to the seriousness of injuries and are exacerbated by lack of adequate pre-hospital emergency care services, costing the lives of many Ethiopians.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.afjem.2020.09.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7910177PMC
March 2021

Disaster Preparedness in Selected Hospitals of Western Ethiopia and Risk Perceptions of Their Authorities.

Open Access Emerg Med 2020 8;12:219-225. Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Department of Nursing, Institute of Health Science, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Purpose: Despite the fact that hospitals are always at a high risk of disasters, the preparedness status in many of the Ethiopian hospitals is not well recognized. It is with this research gap in mind that this study motivated the authors to assess disaster preparedness level in selected hospitals of the western part of Ethiopia and their authorities' risk perceptions.

Methods: This was a facility-based study conducted by using mixed qualitative and quantitative research designs among selected hospitals of western Ethiopia. While disaster and emergency readiness was evaluated using a modified World Health Organization observation check list. The key informant interview method was used to assess the disaster risk perception of the hospitals' authorities in the study area.

Results: The overall level of emergency and disaster preparedness in the selected hospitals was weak with an average calculated preparedness score of 45.6%. The score of readiness in terms of disaster response and recovery planning was 33.3%. Moreover, we have not got a documented disaster plan in all of the hospitals and the hazard-specific response sub plans were also not consistently in place. Of prime concerns, this study has revealed that there was no patient evacuation plan in all of the selected hospitals. The human resource preparations of the hospitals were relatively better with an average readiness score of 60%. The study has found that no committee was responsible for emergency readiness at all of the sampled hospitals. The hospital authorities' disaster risk perception was found to vary according to the type of calamities and this was from moderate to high level.

Conclusion: This study concludes that although their authorities' risk perception of disasters was high, the selected hospitals were ill-prepared for the potential disaster strikes in this study area.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S260314DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7550709PMC
October 2020

Patterns, Associated Factors, and Clinical Outcomes of Poisoning among Poisoning Cases Presented to Selected Hospitals in Western Ethiopia: Hospital-Based Study.

Emerg Med Int 2020 6;2020:5741692. Epub 2020 May 6.

Wollega University, College of Health Science, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Psychiatric Nursing, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Results: The broad types of poisoning were identified in about 193 (91.47%) cases of poisoning in this study. Pesticides exposure and food poisoning have, respectively, contributed for 32.70% and 20.91% of the poisoning incidence. On the other hand, chemical from industry has contributed the least percentage (2.81%). Out of a total of 24 agents identified, 26.80% of the agents were organophosphates followed by raw meat (18.40%). Difference in the incidence of poisoning was also observed as seasons in a year change. Among the victims who have taken household materials as a poisoning agent, about 47.87% of them have taken the agents during daytime. The remaining cases of poisoning developed by household chemicals occurred at night. More than half (54.98%) of the poisoned patients have encountered the incidents inside their home. Regarding the final poisoning outcome, about 7.10% poisoning cases in this study died of the poisonings. Factors such as place, time, intention, and source of poisoning were observed to determine poisoning outcomes. Although poisoning attempt was lesser among urban residents as compared to rural community, rural dwellers were four times more likely to die of poisoning they had attempted (AOR: 4.072 (1.197-13.85)).

Conclusion: This study has clearly showed that the incidence of poisoning was varied with seasonal variations. The encountered poisonings ended up with mixed clinical outcomes, which were also affected by patients' demographic and clinical characteristics. Fertilizers, unclean food items, household materials, and drugs have caused majority of the poisonings. Creating community awareness and designing sound prevention strategies are recommended to reduce morbidity and mortality related to poisoning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/5741692DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7225863PMC
May 2020

Spectrum, Pattern, and Clinical Outcomes of Adult Emergency Department Admissions in Selected Hospitals of Western Ethiopia: A Hospital-Based Prospective Study.

Emerg Med Int 2019 6;2019:8374017. Epub 2019 Aug 6.

Wollega University, Institute of Health Science, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Psychiatry Nursing, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: There has been a steady rise in the absolute number of emergency room admissions over the last few decades. The healthcare delivery system of a country is required to be adjusted to patterns of morbidity and mortality to mitigate the minimized prolonged ill health consequences and premature death of adults. The spectrum, patterns, morbidity, and mortality of health and health-related emergency conditions for which patients visit hospitals often reflect the magnitude of different health problems in a society. The objective of this study was therefore to assess the spectrum, pattern, characteristics, and clinical outcomes of emergency department admissions among adult people who visited EDs of the selected hospitals in western Ethiopia.

Methodology: Hospital-based prospective cross-sectional study design was utilized. To select hospitals to be included in the study, the area sampling technique was used. Five administrative zones in west Oromia were selected as geographical clusters. Then, four hospitals were randomly selected from each zone. Finally, the consecutive sampling technique was utilized to recruit the study participants.

Results: The mean age of the patients admitted to emergency departments (EDs) of the selected hospitals was 34.98 years. The male-to-female ratio of the respondents was nearly equal (1 : 1.04). While one-fourth (20.4%) of the patients arrived by ambulances (without identifying reason), 23.6% of them visited the emergency department as they had no other place to go. Medical emergencies (45.4%) were the leading types of emergencies followed by traumatic emergencies (27.3%). Respiratory distress (12.43%), extremity fractures (9.61%), and hypertensive disorders (8.6%) were among the top leading causes of adult ED admissions. Vital signs were deranged in about 59.4% of the cases. The most common type of immediately life-threatening problems identified on arrival was impairment of breathing (37%), followed by circulatory compromises (30%). Emergency department admission patterns were variable with peak admissions in the month of February and the lowest in November. The vast majority (90.9%) of emergency patients survived. While 8.5% of patients died of the various types of emergency conditions, the final clinical outcome was not identified in 1.5% of the patients.

Conclusion: This study has showed mixed cases with varied patterns and outcomes of adult emergency department admissions. As overall there is a need to be alert during specific seasons, actions must be taken to improve the readiness of existing emergency room services. Furthermore, it is worthwhile to invest further on standardizing and organizing prehospital services at the community level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/8374017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6701330PMC
August 2019

Primary school teachers' misconceptions about Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Nekemte town, Oromia region, Western Ethiopia.

BMC Res Notes 2019 Aug 20;12(1):524. Epub 2019 Aug 20.

Department of Comprehensive Nursing, Wollega University, Nekemte, Oromia, Ethiopia.

Objective: Teachers' misconception on Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in general and the implementation of effective educational strategies for children with this problem in particular is one obstacle that largely impacts the academic and overall success of school children with this problem. In Ethiopia, despite there are thousands of school children with this ADHD, no studies have been conducted to examine school teachers' understanding about problem. This research was therefore aimed to investigate primary school teachers' misconceptions about ADHD in Western Ethiopia.

Result: In this study, 76.2% of respondents had misconception on general awareness of ADHD. More than half (62.7%) of them had misconceptions on the diagnosis and on 81% had misconceptions regarding treatment of the problem. Concerning teachers' misconception on the contemporarily recommended educational placement of students with ADHD, 141 (68.3%) have said that such students should be placed in part time special education. The findings of this research have clearly indicated that primary school teachers have a wide range of misconceptions about the ADHD. It also reflects the need of equipping teachers with basic knowledge of ADHD which also enables them provide effective support for students with this exceptionality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-019-4573-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6701197PMC
August 2019

Assessment of focused antenatal care utilization and associated factors in Western Oromia, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

BMC Res Notes 2019 May 15;12(1):277. Epub 2019 May 15.

Department of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Institute of Health Science, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Objective: Despite the fact that quality antenatal care is one of the essential aspects in maternal and child health care, the current perceived quality and associated factors of this service is not well acknowledged in Ethiopia. This study was therefore undertaken to assess focused antenatal care service utilization and associated factors in western Ethiopia.

Result: This study has measured the utilization of focused antenatal care services in terms of regularity of frequency of attendance, initiation time and completeness of the components. In about 19.8% of mothers attendance was irregular. While than three-fourths 330 (78.6%) started in the second trimester, and 42 (10%) of them commenced in the third trimester. The essential components of the services like counseling on nutrition, family planning, and HIV/AIDS were respectively missing in 1.9%, 8.3% and 7.4% of clients. Providing and receiving quality ANC was found to have emanated from different factors which were related to mothers, providers and facilities. Although the overall ANC utilization noticed deceivingly seems satisfactory, it was not fully comprehensive, focused and not to its current standard. Further efforts in terms of effective planning, monitoring and evaluation activities on the service are therefore strongly recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-019-4311-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6521418PMC
May 2019
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