Publications by authors named "Asha Hema Malini"

4 Publications

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Dietary intake of trace elements from commercially important fish and shellfish of Thoothukudi along the southeast coast of India and implications for human health risk assessment.

Mar Pollut Bull 2021 Dec 9;173(Pt A):113020. Epub 2021 Oct 9.

Department of Fish Quality Assurance and Management, Fisheries College and Research Institute, Thoothukudi, India.

The concentrations of eight trace elements (chromium, cobalt, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead) in14 commercially important fish and shellfish collected from Thoothukudi along the southeast coast of India was investigated using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in order to assess the health risks associated with their consumption. The concentration of trace elements ranged from 0.001 to 39.5 μg/g. The estimated weekly intake of cadmium in seven fish and shellfish (0.0081-0.0996 mg/kg body weight) were above the provisional tolerable weekly intake set by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. The risk assessment analysis indicated that there was non- carcinogenic risk upon lifetime consumption of rock crab, C. natator (TTHQ >1) and carcinogenic risks upon lifetime consumption of S. jello, P. semisulcatus, P. sanguinolentus C. natator, Uroteuthis duvaceli, Sepia pharaonis and Cistopus indicus due to cadmium exposure indicating a potential health risk to the exposed consumers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2021.113020DOI Listing
December 2021

Heavy metal concentration in reef-associated surface sediments, Hare Island, Gulf of Mannar Marine Biosphere Reserve (southeast coast of India): The first report on pollution load and biological hazard assessment using geochemical normalization factors and hazard indices.

Mar Pollut Bull 2021 Jan 19;162:111838. Epub 2020 Nov 19.

Department of Fish Quality Assurance and Management, Fisheries College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Fisheries University, Tuticorin 628 008, Tamil Nadu, India.

In this study, reef-associated surface sediment samples were collected from Hare Island in the Gulf of Mannar Marine Biosphere Reserve, Bay of Bengal and analyzed for heavy metal concentration. The sediment quality was evaluated based on the geochemical, biological, and ecological hazard indices. The mean concentration of heavy metals in the sediments ranged from 0.02 (Cd) to 26,262.87 mg/kg (Fe). Except for Cd and Hg, all other elements were found to be below the sediment quality guidelines and contamination level. The biological and ecological hazard (BEHI) revealed that most sediment samples (80%) fell under the low-risk category with 9% probability of toxicity to the marine flora and fauna. The overall contamination level of heavy metals in Hare Island suggested that the sediment could be grouped under low-risk category. Hence, this study recommends the need for a routine monitoring program in this region to maintain a clean and sustainable ecosystem in future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111838DOI Listing
January 2021

Risk assessment of organochlorine pesticides in seaweeds along the Gulf of Mannar, Southeast India.

Mar Pollut Bull 2020 Dec 7;161(Pt B):111709. Epub 2020 Oct 7.

Department of Fisheries Economics and Statistics, Faculty of Fishery Science, Kolkata, India.

Bioaccumulation of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in red, green, and brown seaweeds from the Gulf of Mannar was investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The concentration of OCPs in all the seaweeds was in the order of endosulfan > endrin > HCH > DDT > aldrin > heptachlor > methoxychlor. The concentrations of HCH, endrin, endosulfan, and DDT in Sargassum wightii and Gelidiella acerosa, and HCH and endosulfan in Gracilaria verrucosa were above the limits prescribed by the European Commission. However, in Ulva lactuca, except for endosulfan, all other OCPs were below the permissible level. The bioaccumulation of OCPs in seaweeds was in the order of S. wightii > G. acerosa > Gracilaria verrucosa > U. lactuca. The results of comparative analysis of the levels of the investigated pesticides against the standard human health risk assessment revealed that pesticide exposure from seaweeds is hazardous to human health and the marine environment of the Gulf of Mannar.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111709DOI Listing
December 2020

Prevalence of antibiotic resistant Salmonella spp. strains in shrimp farm source waters of Nagapattinam region in South India.

Mar Pollut Bull 2020 Jun 28;155:111171. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Department of Fishing Technology & Fisheries Engineering, FC&RI, TNJFU, Thoothukudi 628008, India.

The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella spp. in the source waters of shrimp farms in the Nagapattinam region of South India was investigated. Water and sediment samples (188 Nos.) collected from 23 natural creeks during December 2018 to April 2019 were examined for Salmonella spp. by conventional and PCR methods. The study indicated 28.7% of water and 25.5% of sediment isolates as Salmonella spp., while PCR test gave positive for 7.44% and 5.15% of the isolates, respectively. The isolates were resistant to sulfonamide (SF), but sensitive to tetracycline (TC), chloramphenicol (CAP), and furazolidone (FZ). PCR amplification of mitochondrial 16S rRNA region identified the highly resistant Salmonella serovar as S. Montevideo, which is an emerging food-borne pathogen. The incidence of antibiotic-resistant S. Montevideo reported for the first time in the natural creeks that supply water for shrimp farms emphasizes the need for regulatory steps to control its prevalence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111171DOI Listing
June 2020
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