Publications by authors named "Ase-Karine Fjeldheim"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Immune responses of a meningococcal A + W outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine with and without aluminium hydroxide adjuvant in two different mouse strains.

APMIS 2016 Nov 20;124(11):996-1003. Epub 2016 Sep 20.

Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH), Domain for Infection Control and Environmental Health, Oslo, Norway.

Meningococci (Neisseria meningiditis) of serogroups A and W have caused large epidemics of meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa for decades, and affordable and multivalent vaccines, effective in all age groups, are needed. A bivalent serogroup A and W (A + W) meningococcal vaccine candidate consisting of deoxycholate-extracted outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from representative African disease isolates was previously found to be highly immunogenic in outbred mice when formulated with the adjuvant aluminium hydroxide (AH). OMV has been shown to have inherent adjuvant properties. In order to study the importance of AH and genetical differences between mice strains on immune responses, we compared the immunogenicity of the A + W OMV vaccine when formulated with or without AH in inbred C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ mice (Th1 and Th2 dominant strains, respectively). The immunogenicity of the vaccine was found to be comparable in the two mice strains despite their different immune profiles. Adsorption to AH increased anti-OMV IgG levels and serum bactericidal activity (SBA). The immune responses were increased by each dose for the adsorbed vaccine, but the third dose did not significantly improve the immunogenicity further. Thus, a vaccine formulation with the A and W OMV will likely benefit from including AH as adjuvant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apm.12589DOI Listing
November 2016

Dietary supplementation with 22-S-hydroxycholesterol to rats reduces body weight gain and the accumulation of liver triacylglycerol.

Lipids 2012 May 18;47(5):483-93. Epub 2012 Mar 18.

Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, P. O. Box 1068, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway.

This study explores the pharmacokinetics of 22-S-hydroxycholesterol (22SHC) in vivo in rats. We also carried out a metabolic study to explore whether the beneficial effects observed of 22SHC on glucose and lipid metabolism in vitro could be seen in vivo in rats. In the pharmacokinetic study, rats were given 50 mg/kg of [³H]22-S-hydroxycholesterol before absorption, distribution and excretion were monitored. In the metabolic study, the effect of 22SHC (30 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks) in rats on body weight gain [chow and high-fat diet (HFD)], serum lipids triacylglycerol (TAG) content and gene expression in liver and skeletal muscle were examined. Results showed that 22SHC was well absorbed after oral administration and distributed to most organs and mainly excreted in feces. Rats receiving 22SHC gained less body weight than their controls regardless whether the animals received chow diet or HFD. Moreover, we observed that animals receiving HFD had elevated levels of serum TAG while this was not observed for animals on HFD supplemented with 22SHC. The amount of TAG in liver was reduced after 22SHC treatment in animals receiving either chow diet or HFD. Gene expression analysis revealed that two genes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 and uncoupling protein 3) involved in fatty acid oxidation and energy dissipation were increased in liver. Ucp3 expression (both protein and mRNA level) was increased in skeletal muscle, but insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and TAG content were unchanged. In conclusion, 22SHC seems to be an interesting model substance in the search of treatments for disorders involving aberrations in lipid metabolism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11745-012-3663-4DOI Listing
May 2012

Periostin is a collagen associated bone matrix protein regulated by parathyroid hormone.

Matrix Biol 2010 Sep 21;29(7):594-601. Epub 2010 Jul 21.

Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, PO Box 1112 Blindern, University of Oslo, N-0317 Oslo, Norway.

Periostin is a 90 kDa secreted protein, originally identified in murine osteoblast-like cells, with a distribution restricted to collagen-rich tissues and certain tumors. In this paper, we first analyzed the expression of periostin mRNA and protein in human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB) and human osteosarcoma (hOS) cell lines by RT real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The hFOB 1.19 and three hOS (MHM, KPDXM and Eggen) showed highly variable periostin mRNA levels and protein. Second, we showed that the expression of periostin mRNA was inversely related to the cells' abilities to differentiate and mineralize. Then, we investigated the regulation of periostin mRNA in hFOB after siRNA treatment and in mouse primary osteoblasts (mOB) treated with PTH. Knock-down of periostin mRNA, down-regulated PTHrP, but did not affect the expression of other important markers of differentiation such as RUNX2. In addition, periostin mRNA was transiently up-regulated in osteoblasts by PTH. Finally, the localization of periostin and its partially co-localization with collagen 1a1 mRNA and protein was studied in mouse embryos and postnatal pups using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. In conclusion, the present study provides novel observations related to the expression, distribution and regulation of periostin in bone cells and extracellular matrix.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matbio.2010.07.001DOI Listing
September 2010

Thyrotrophin-releasing hormone receptor 1 and prothyrotrophin-releasing hormone mRNA expression in the central nervous system are regulated by suckling in lactating rats.

Eur J Endocrinol 2005 May;152(5):791-803

Institute of Basic Medical Science, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1112 Blindern, N-0317 Oslo, Norway.

Background: The accepted function of the hypothalamic peptide, thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH), is to initiate release of thyrotrophin (TSH) from the pituitary. A physiological role for TRH in lactating rats has not yet been established.

Methods: Tissues were prepared from random-cycling and lactating rats and analysed using Northern blot, real time RT-PCR and quantitative in situ hybridisation.

Results: This study demonstrates that TRH receptor 1 (TRHR1) mRNA expression is up-regulated in the pituitary and in discrete nuclei of the hypothalamus in lactating rats, while proTRH mRNA expression levels are increased only in the hypothalamus. The results were corroborated by quantitative in situ analysis of proTRH and TRHR1. Bromocriptine, which reduced prolactin (PRL) concentrations in plasma of lactating and nursing rats, also counteracted the suckling-induced increase in TRHR1 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus, but had an opposite effect in the pituitary. These changes were confined to the hypothalamus and the amygdala in the brain.

Conclusions: The present study shows that the mechanisms of suckling-induced lactation involve region-specific regulation of TRHR1 and proTRH mRNAs in the central nervous system notably at the hypothalamic level. The results demonstrate that continued suckling is critical to maintain plasma prolactin (PRL) levels as well as proTRH and TRHR1 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus. Increased plasma PRL levels may have a positive modulatory role on the proTRH/TRHR1 system during suckling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/eje.1.01902DOI Listing
May 2005

The human neuroendocrine thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor promoter is activated by the haematopoietic transcription factor c-Myb.

Biochem J 2003 Jun;372(Pt 3):851-9

Department of Biochemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1041 Blindern, Norway.

Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor (TRHR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor playing a crucial role in the anterior pituitary where it controls the synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin. Its widespread presence not only in the central nervous system, but also in peripheral tissues, including thymus, indicates other important, but unknown, functions. One hypothesis is that the neuropeptide TRH could play a role in the immune system. We report here that the human TRHR promoter contains 11 putative response elements for the haematopoietic transcription factor c-Myb and is highly Myb-responsive in transfection assays. Analysis of Myb binding to putative response elements revealed one preferred binding site in intron 1 of the receptor gene. Transfection studies of promoter deletions confirmed that this high-affinity element is necessary for efficient Myb-dependent transactivation of reporter plasmids in CV-1 cells. The Myb-dependent activation of the TRHR promoter was strongly suppressed by expression of a dominant negative Myb-Engrailed fusion. In line with these observations, reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of rat tissues showed that the TRHR gene is expressed both in thymocytes and bone marrow. Furthermore, specific, high-affinity TRH agonist binding to cell-surface receptors was demonstrated in thymocytes and a haematopoietic cell line. Our findings imply a novel functional link between the neuroendocrine and the immune systems at the level of promoter regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/BJ20030057DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1223435PMC
June 2003