Publications by authors named "Arun Torris"

6 Publications

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Micro-computed tomographic analysis of the marginal adaptation of a calcium silicate-based cement to radicular dentin after removal of three different intracanal medicaments - An study.

J Conserv Dent 2020 Nov-Dec;23(6):598-603. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Polymer Science and Engineering Division, CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

Context: This study focuses on the marginal adaptation of a calcium silicate-based cement to the root dentin after retrieval of different intracanal medicaments.

Aim: This study compared the marginal adaptation of a calcium silicate-based cement to radicular dentin in the apical third of the root canal following the use of three different intracanal medicaments.

Materials And Methods: Forty single-rooted premolar teeth ( = 40) were decoronated 13 mm above the root apices; then, 3 mm of the root tips were resected to standardize the root length. Orthograde cleaning and shaping were done using the rotary files and apical enlargement using peeso reamers. Depending on the intracanal medicament used, the samples were equally divided into four groups: Group 1 - control, Group 2 - Metapex, Group 3 - triple antibiotic paste (TAP), and Group 4 - calcium hydroxide with Propolis. Subsequently, the medicament was removed and a 3 mm apical barrier of Biodentine was placed and later scanned using an ex vivo micro-computed tomography scanner.

Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA -test and Tukey's test were used.

Results: Maximum adaptation was seen in control group (0.65) > Propolis (1.47) > TAP (4.37) > Metapex (5.25); a high statistically significant difference between the four groups was found ( < 0.001) with regard to the external voids between Biodentine and radicular dentin.

Conclusion: On comparison of the marginal adaptation of Biodentine to root canal dentin following the use of three different intracanal medicaments, maximum adaptation was seen in Group 1, followed by Group 4, Group 3, and Group 2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/JCD.JCD_561_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8095688PMC
February 2021

Design and synthesis of a new topical agent for halting blood loss rapidly: A multimodal chitosan-gelatin xerogel composite loaded with silica nanoparticles and calcium.

Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 2021 Feb 6;198:111454. Epub 2020 Nov 6.

Nanobioscience, Agharkar Research Institute, Pune 411004 India; Department of Biotechnology, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 India. Electronic address:

Uncontrolled hemorrhage often causes death during traumatic injuries and halting exsanguination topically is a challenge. Here, an efficient multimodal topical hemostat was developed by (i) ionically crosslinking chitosan and gelatin with sodium tripolyphosphate for (ii) fabricating a robust, highly porous xerogel by lyophilization having 86.7 % porosity, by micro-CT and large pores ∼30 μm by SEM (iii) incorporating 0.5 mg synthesized silica nanoparticles (SiNPs, 120 nm size, -22 mV charge) and 2.5 mM calcium in xerogel composite that was confirmed by FTIR analysis with peaks at 3372, 986 and 788 cm, respectively. XPS analysis displayed the presence of SiNPs (Si2p peak for silicon) and calcium (Ca2p1, Ca2p3 transition peaks) in the composite. Interestingly, in silico percolation simulation for composite revealed interlinked 800 μm long-conduits predicting excellent absorption capacity and validated experimentally (640 % of composite dry weight). The composite achieved >16-fold improved blood clotting in vitro than commercial Celox and Gauze through multimodal interaction of its components with RBCs and platelets. The composite displayed good platelet activation and thrombin generation activities. It displayed high compressive strength (2.45 MPa) and withstood pressure during application. Moreover, xerogel composite showed high biocompatibility. In vivo application of xerogel composite to lethal femoral artery injury in rats achieved hemostasis (2.5 min) significantly faster than commercial Celox (3.3 min) and Gauze (4.6 min) and was easily removed from the wound. The gamma irradiated composite was stable till 1.5 yr. Therefore, the xerogel composite has potential for application as a rapid topical hemostatic agent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2020.111454DOI Listing
February 2021

An In Situ Cross-Linked Nonaqueous Polymer Electrolyte for Zinc-Metal Polymer Batteries and Hybrid Supercapacitors.

Small 2020 Sep 30;16(35):e2002528. Epub 2020 Jul 30.

Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, Pune, Maharashtra, 411008, India.

This work reports the facile synthesis of nonaqueous zinc-ion conducting polymer electrolyte (ZIP) membranes using an ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced photopolymerization technique, with room temperature (RT) ionic conductivity values in the order of 10 S cm . The ZIP membranes demonstrate excellent physicochemical and electrochemical properties, including an electrochemical stability window of >2.4 V versus Zn|Zn and dendrite-free plating/stripping processes in symmetric Zn||Zn cells. Besides, a UV-polymerization-assisted in situ process is developed to produce ZIP (abbreviated i-ZIP), which is adopted for the first time to fabricate a nonaqueous zinc-metal polymer battery (ZMPB; VOPO |i-ZIP|Zn) and zinc-metal hybrid polymer supercapacitor (ZMPS; activated carbon|i-ZIP|Zn) cells. The VOPO cathode employed in ZMPB possesses a layered morphology, exhibiting a high average operating voltage of ≈1.2 V. As compared to the conventional polymer cell assembling approach using the ex situ process, the in situ process is simple and it enhances the overall electrochemical performance, which enables the widespread intrusion of ZMPBs and ZMPSs into the application domain. Indeed, considering the promising aspects of the proposed ZIP and its easy processability, this work opens up a new direction for the emergence of the zinc-based energy storage technologies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/smll.202002528DOI Listing
September 2020

Self-assemblies of nucleolipid supramolecular synthons show unique self-sorting and cooperative assembling process.

Nanoscale 2019 Jun;11(24):11956-11966

Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008, India.

The inherent control of the self-sorting and co-assembling process that has evolved in multi-component biological systems is not easy to emulate in vitro using synthetic supramolecular synthons. Here, using the basic component of nucleic acids and lipids, we describe a simple platform to build hierarchical assemblies of two component systems, which show an interesting self-sorting and co-assembling behavior. The assembling systems are made of a combination of amphiphilic purine and pyrimidine ribonucleoside-fatty acid conjugates (nucleolipids), which were prepared by coupling fatty acid acyl chains of different lengths at the 2'-O- and 3'-O-positions of the ribose sugar. Individually, the purine and pyrimidine nucleolipids adopt a distinct morphology, which either supports or does not support the gelation process. Interestingly, due to the subtle difference in the order of formation and stability of individual assemblies, different mixtures of supramolecular synthons and complementary ribonucleosides exhibit a cooperative and disruptive self-sorting and co-assembling behavior. A systematic morphological analysis combined with single crystal X-ray crystallography, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), NMR, CD, rheological and 3D X-ray microtomography studies provided insights into the mechanism of the self-sorting and co-assembling process. Taken together, this approach has enabled the construction of assemblies with unique higher ordered architectures and gels with remarkably enhanced mechanical strength that cannot be derived from the respective single component systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9nr01863hDOI Listing
June 2019

Mapping Fusogenicity of Ciprofloxacin-Loaded Liposomes with Bacterial Cells.

AAPS PharmSciTech 2019 May 1;20(5):180. Epub 2019 May 1.

Department of Pharmaceutics, Poona College of Pharmacy, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University, Erandwane, Pune, Maharashtra, 411038, India.

The process of liposome fusion with cellular membrane plays key role in delivering encapsulated drug molecule into the cell. This process becomes very important for molecules having low permeability as they fail to reach the site of action located inside the cell. Ciprofloxacin (CIP), a broad-spectrum BCS class IV antibiotic, has poor permeability. In the present work, CIP-loaded liposomes were prepared using solvent evaporation method and optimized by 3 factorial design approach. The optimized batch of CIP-loaded liposomes was characterized for size, entrapment efficiency, zeta potential, FTIR, and microbial susceptibility study on Staphylococcus aureus (gram-positive bacteria) and Escherichia coli (gram-negative bacteria). Confocal microscopy was used to study the fusogenicity process of CIP-loaded liposomes with bacterial cells. Additionally, the kinetics of fusogenicity process was studied using SAXS for the first time. Surprisingly, the rate of fusion of CIP-loaded liposomes with cell wall of S. aureus was twice when compared to the cell wall of E. coli. It is believed that the current work can act as a roadmap in selection of proper excipients while developing formulations which would expedite the fusogenicity and may execute pharmacological activity of poorly penetrable drug molecules at lower dose.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1208/s12249-019-1381-4DOI Listing
May 2019

Inducing Disorder in Order: Hierarchically Porous Covalent Organic Framework Nanostructures for Rapid Removal of Persistent Organic Pollutants.

J Am Chem Soc 2019 05 26;141(18):7572-7581. Epub 2019 Apr 26.

Department of Chemical Sciences , Indian Institute of Science Education and Research , Kolkata , Mohanpur 741246 , India.

The key factor responsible for fast diffusion and mass transfer through a porous material is the availability of a widely open pore interior having complete accessibility from their surface. However, because of their highly stacked nature, ordered two-dimensional (2D) materials fail to find real-world applicability, as it is difficult to take advantage of their complete structure, especially the inner cores. In this regard, three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures constructed from layered two-dimensional crystallites could prove to be advantageous. However, the real challenge is to cultivate a porous nanostructure with ordered pores where the pores are surrounded by crystalline walls. Herein, a simple yet versatile in situ gas-phase foaming technique has been employed to address these cardinal issues. The use of baking soda leads to the continuous effervescence of CO during the crystallization of foam, which creates ripples and fluctuations on the surface of the 2D crystallites. The induction of ordered micropores within the disordered 3D architecture synergistically renders fast diffusion of various guests through the interconnected pore network. The high-density defects in the hierarchically porous structure help in ultrafast adsorption (<10 s) of various pollutants (removal efficiency of 99%) from water, all of which would lead to significant environmental benefit. The pseudo-second-order rate constant for the BPA pollutant is 182.3 g mg min, which is the highest among all the literature reports to date. The high removal efficiency (highest efficiency of 94% and average efficiency of 70%) of a persistent organic pollutant has been attended for the first time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jacs.9b02706DOI Listing
May 2019
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