Publications by authors named "Arturo Javier Aranda Garcia"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of rotary instrument associated with different irrigation techniques on removing calcium hydroxide dressing.

Microsc Res Tech 2014 Aug 20;77(8):642-6. Epub 2014 May 20.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, Araraquara Dental School, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP, Brazil.

Calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2 ] residues in root canals may compromise sealing of filling and endodontic treatment success. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of using rotary instrument associated with EndoActivator, EndoVac, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), and conventional needle irrigation (CNI), in Ca(OH)2 removal from root canal, by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Sixty-six human canines were prepared with the Protaper system up to F5 and filled with Ca(OH)2 . After 7 days, Ca(OH)2 was removed with rotary instrument F5 associated with the irrigation techniques used in each group (n = 15): GI (CNI), GII (EndoVac), GIII (EndoActivator) and GIV (PUI). In all groups 15 mL of 2.5% NaOCl and 3 mL of 17% EDTA were used for Ca(OH)2 removal. The Ca(OH)2 residues was evaluated by SEM in the middle and apical third using a system of scores. The results were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (α = 0.05). None of the techniques completely removed the Ca(OH)2 from root canals. There was no difference between EndoActivator, EndoVac and PUI (P > 0.05), but the three techniques removed more Ca(OH)2 than the CNI (P < 0,05), in the middle and apical thirds of the root canal. It was concluded that the rotary instrument combined with EndoActivator, EndoVac, and PUI was shown to be more efficient than the rotary instrument combined with the CNI in removing Ca(OH)2 from the root canal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jemt.22382DOI Listing
August 2014

Evaluation of the interaction between sodium hypochlorite and several formulations containing chlorhexidine and its effect on the radicular dentin--SEM and push-out bond strength analysis.

Microsc Res Tech 2014 Jan 4;77(1):17-22. Epub 2013 Nov 4.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, Araraquara Dental School, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara - São Paulo, Brazil.

The aim of the current study was to evaluate the presence of debris and smear layer after endodontic irrigation with different formulations of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and its effects on the push-out bond strength of an epoxy-based sealer on the radicular dentin. One hundred extracted human canines were prepared to F5 instrument and irrigated with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Fifty teeth were divided into five groups (n = 10), according to the final irrigation protocol with different 2% CHX formulations: G1 (control, no final rinse irrigation), G2 (CHX solution), G3 (CHX gel), G4 (Concepsis), and G5 (CHX Plus). In sequence, the specimens were submitted to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, in the cervical-medium and medium-apical segments, to evaluate the presence of debris and smear layer. The other 50 teeth were treated equally to a SEM study, but with the root canals filled with an epoxy-based endodontic sealer and submitted to a push-out bond strength test, in the cervical, middle, and apical thirds. G2, G3, G4, and G5 provided higher precipitation of the debris and smear layer than G1 (P < 0.05), but these groups were similar to each other (P > 0.05), in both segments. The values obtained in the push out test did not differ between groups, independent of the radicular third (P > 0.05). The CHXs formulations caused precipitation of the debris and smear layer on the radicular dentin, but these residues did not interfere in the push-out bond strength of the epoxy-based sealer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jemt.22307DOI Listing
January 2014

The efficacy of the self-adjusting file and ProTaper for removal of calcium hydroxide from root canals.

J Appl Oral Sci 2013 Jul-Aug;21(4):346-50

Department of Restorative Dentistry, Araraquara Dental School, Univ. Estadual Paulista, AraraquaraSP, Brazil.

Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Self-Adjusting File (SAF) and ProTaper for removing calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] from root canals.

Material And Methods: Thirty-six human mandibular incisors were instrumented with the ProTaper system up to instrument F2 and filled with a Ca(OH)2-based dressing. After 7 days, specimens were distributed in two groups (n=15) according to the method of Ca(OH)2 removal. Group I (SAF) was irrigated with 5 mL of NaOCl and SAF was used for 30 seconds under constant irrigation with 5 mL of NaOCl using the Vatea irrigation device, followed by irrigation with 3 mL of EDTA and 5 mL of NaOCl. Group II (ProTaper) was irrigated with 5 mL of NaOCl, the F2 instrument was used for 30 seconds, followed by irrigation with 5 mL of NaOCl, 3 mL of EDTA, and 5 mL of NaOCl. In 3 teeth Ca(OH)2 was not removed (positive control) and in 3 teeth canals were not filled with Ca(OH)2 (negative control). Teeth were sectioned and prepared for the scanning electron microscopy. The amounts of residual Ca(OH)2 were evaluated in the middle and apical thirds using a 5-score system.

Results: None of the techniques completely removed the Ca(OH)2 dressing. No difference was observed between SAF and ProTaper in removing Ca(OH)2 in the middle (P=0.11) and the apical (P=0.23) thirds.

Conclusion: The SAF system showed similar efficacy to rotary instrument for removal of Ca(OH)2 from mandibular incisor root canals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1678-775720130034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3881888PMC
January 2014

Effect of final irrigation protocols on microhardness and erosion of root canal dentin.

Microsc Res Tech 2013 Oct 29;76(10):1079-83. Epub 2013 Jul 29.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, Araraquara Dental School, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista Araraquara, SP, Brazil.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of final irrigation protocols (17% EDTA, BioPure MTAD, SmearClear, and QMiX) on microhardness and erosion of root canal dentin. Fifty roots were sectioned transversely at the cement-enamel junction and each root was sectioned horizontally into 4-mm-thick slices. The samples were divided into five groups (n = 10) according to the final irrigation protocol: G1: distilled water (control group); G2: 17% EDTA; G3: BioPure MTAD; G4: SmearClear; and G5: QMiX. The dentin microhardness was then measured with a load of 25 g for 10 s. Initially, the reference microhardness values were obtained for the samples without any etching. The same samples were then submitted to the final irrigation protocols. A new measure was realized and the difference between before and after the procedures was the dentin microhardness reduction. In sequence, the specimens were submitted to SEM analysis to verify the dentinal erosion. The Kruskal Wallis and Dunn tests (α = 5%) were used to compare the results. The dentin microhardness decreased for all final irrigation protocols. There was no significant difference between groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 (P > 0.05), but this groups presented significant dentin microhardness reduction than G1 (P < 0.05). In G2, occurred the highest incidence of dentinal erosion (P < 0.05). 17% EDTA, BioPure MTAD, SmearClear, and QMiX promoted significant dentin microhardness reduction. Dentinal tubules erosion was promoted by 17% EDTA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jemt.22268DOI Listing
October 2013

Effect of the root canal final rinse protocols on the debris and smear layer removal and on the push-out strength of an epoxy-based sealer.

Microsc Res Tech 2013 May 26;76(5):533-7. Epub 2013 Feb 26.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, Araraquara Dental School, UNESP-University Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil.

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of QMiX, SmearClear, and 17% EDTA for the debris and smear layer removal from the root canal and its effects on the push-out bond strength of an epoxy-based sealer by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Forty extracted human canines (n = 10) were assigned to the following final rinse protocols: G1-distilled water (control), G2-17% EDTA, G3-SmearClear, and G4-QMiX. The specimens were submitted to a SEM analysis to evaluate the presence of debris and smear layer, respectively, in the apical or cervical segments. In sequence, forty extracted human maxillary canines with the root canals instrumented were divided into four groups (n = 10) similar to the SEM analysis study. After the filling with AH Plus, the roots were transversally sectioned to obtain dentinal slices. The specimens were submitted to a push-out bond strength test using an electromechanical testing machine. The statistical analysis for the SEM and push-out bond strength studies were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (α = 5%). There was no difference among the G2, G3, and G4 efficacy in removing the debris and smear layer (P > 0.05). The efficacy of these groups was superior to the control group. The push-out bond strength values of G2, G3, and G4 were superior to the control group. The ability to remove the debris and smear layer by SmearClear and QMiX was as effective as the 17% EDTA. The final rinse with these solutions promoted similar push-out bond strength values.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jemt.22196DOI Listing
May 2013
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