Publications by authors named "Artur Pokropek"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Large-for-gestational-age or macrosomia as a classifier for risk of adverse perinatal outcome: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2021 Feb 18:1-8. Epub 2021 Feb 18.

Department of Reproductive Health, Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Warsaw, Poland.

Objective: Small for gestational age (SGA) fetuses and neonates are of great interest, while those who are too big are much less studied. The aim was to analyze the classifiers described by ACOG "Fetal macrosomia" practice bulletin as predictors of adverse perinatal outcomes for overgrown fetuses and their mothers.

Materials: From a database of 53,586 singleton term births, appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA), large for gestational age (LGA), and macrosomic deliveries were selected. AGA served as a control. The crude and adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were calculated for large-for-gestational-age >90th centile, and macrosomia >4000 g, >4250 g, and >4500 g. Patients with and without diabetes were analyzed separately

Results: Macrosomia >4000 g performed poorer than other classifiers. LGA performed comparably to other definitions of macrosomia. Diabetes carries a severe risk of complications for overgrown neonates, but those non-diabetic also have increased risk.

Conclusions: Definition of macrosomia as weight >4000 g should be reconsidered. LGA >90th centile should be used as a definition of fetal overgrowth along with other definitions of macrosomia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2021.1887127DOI Listing
February 2021

Uterine Artery Doppler Reference Ranges in a Twin Caucasian Population Followed Longitudinally From 17 to 37 Weeks Gestation Compared to Singletons.

J Ultrasound Med 2021 Jan 13. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Department of Reproductive Health, Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Warsaw, Poland.

Objectives: The primary aim was to measure uterine artery (UtA) indices in twin pregnancies of Polish Caucasian women and compare it with a previously published study by Geipel et al for DC twins (2011). The secondary aim was to find differences in UtA indices in MC, DC twins, and singletons.

Methods: A prospective longitudinal evaluation of UtA Doppler indices in 1462 examinations of twins and 5766 examinations of singletons between 17 and 37 gestational age (GA). Pulsatility index (PI) and resistance index (RI) were calculated.

Results: UtA PI and RI are lower in the twins than singletons but the analyzed mean values throughout gestation are higher than the study presented by Geipel et al. Obtained curves for DC twins and singletons had the same form as Geipel's curves. In MC twins, curves are flatter and characterized by lower differences throughout pregnancy than Geipel's curves for DC twins. They tend to be more similar about 32 weeks of gestations, resulting from different placenta structure in MC than DC twin pregnancies.

Conclusions: UtA Doppler indices in twin pregnancies are lower than in singletons. Obtained data have higher values for twins than reference charts proposed by Geipel's for dichorionic twins. We observed some differences between monochorionic and dichorionic twins' curves throughout pregnancy, but they were not significant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jum.15627DOI Listing
January 2021

What are the Critical Elements of Satisfaction and Experience in Labor and Childbirth-A Cross-Sectional Study.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 12 12;17(24). Epub 2020 Dec 12.

Educational Research Institute (IBE), 01-180 Warsaw, Poland.

The labor experience and satisfaction with childbirth are affected by the care provided (external factors) and individual variables (internal factors). In this paper, we present a descriptive analysis that aims to indicate the strongest correlates of birth experience among a wide range of indicators. The study is a prospective, cross-sectional, self-report survey. It includes the experiences of women giving birth in public and private hospitals in Poland. The two main variables were birth experience and satisfaction with care. The analysis consists of three parts: data pre-processing and initial analysis, explorative investigation, and regression analysis. Among the 15 variables with the highest predictive value regarding birth experience were being informed by the medical personnel, communication, and birth environment. The most significant variables among 15 variables, with the highest predictive value regarding care, were those concerning support, information, and respectful care. The strongest predictor for both, birth experience and satisfaction with care, is the sense of information, with logit coefficients of 0.745 and 1.143, respectively, for birth experience and satisfaction (0.367 and 0.346 for standardized OLS coefficient). The findings demonstrate that by using explanatory variables, one can predict a woman's description of her satisfaction with perinatal care received in the hospital. On the other hand, they do not have such a significant and robust influence on the birth experience examined by the variables. For both the birth experience and satisfaction with care, the sense of being informed is the highest predictor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249295DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7764244PMC
December 2020

Risk factors for anxiety and depression among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic: A web-based cross-sectional survey.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2020 Jul;99(30):e21279

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR.

Introduction: The article presents a protocol of a cross-sectional study of mental health of pregnant women in relation to the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic. The primary aim is to compare differences in anxiety and depression scores of pregnant women between countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The secondary aim is to assess demographic, economic, and social aspects affecting maternal anxiety and depression scores among pregnant women worldwide in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, we will be able to compare differences in perception of the different aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic (social distancing, restrictions related to delivery) between countries and according to the epidemic status (number of infected patients, number of reported deaths). The comparisons will also be done according to the COVID-19 status of the participants.

Methods And Analysis: It is a web-based anonymous survey of pregnant women living in countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey is comprised of 3 sections:Web-based recruitment for health research has proven to be cost-effective and efficient. At current times with the COVID-19 pandemic, limited resources and social distancing restrictions, performing a mental health study involving pregnant women on a large international scale cannot be safely conducted without involving social-media.The fears of pregnant women fall into 3 categories: the medical condition, the economic status and the organization of daily activity.The study has received approval of the medical ethics committee and has been registered on Clinicaltrials.gov. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and made public through all available media.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000021279DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7387043PMC
July 2020

Education and Attitudes Toward Migration in a Cross Country Perspective.

Front Psychol 2019 18;10:2224. Epub 2019 Oct 18.

Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

The paper examines the dynamics of native populations' opposition to migration and the role of education in shaping such opposition in European countries using data from the last four editions of the European Social Survey between years 2010 and 2016. We examine both the direct association between education and opposition to migration as well as the mediated association that occurs through feelings of threat. We test for measurement equivalence across countries and years of the two latent constructs in our analyses (opposition to migration and feelings of threat) by applying sequential methods used in alignment optimization to identify partial equivalence and check the level of approximate measurement invariance using BSEM modeling. Our results indicate that the opposition to migration and the feelings of threat scales achieve metric invariance but not scalar invariance in cross-country comparisons. At the substantive level, our findings suggest that better educated individuals express lower opposition to migration than the poorly educated and that as much as 60% of education differentials in opposition to migration are due to the mediated effect through feelings of threat. The high degree of heterogeneity in associations both across countries and over time are, in part, explained by the presence of foreign-born populations and living standards in a country and time point.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02224DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842942PMC
October 2019

Effect of antenatal detection of small-for-gestational-age newborns in a risk stratified retrospective cohort.

PLoS One 2019 31;14(10):e0224553. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Department of Reproductive Health, Warsaw, Poland.

Objective: Small-for-gestational-age (SGA) are neonates born with birth weight below the 10th centile for a given week of pregnancy. It is a risk factor of perinatal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. There is an ongoing debate whether prenatal detection of SGA neonates is good predictor of perinatal outcome especially in low risk populations. Our primary aim was to compare the odds ratios for unfavorable outcome in a risk stratified cohort of SGA neonates in regard to prenatal detection status.

Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study analysing the effect of prenatal detection on perinatal outcome. This cohort has been divided into a predefined low-risk and high-risk population. Electronic records of 39,032 singleton deliveries from 2010 through 2016 were analysed. SGA was defined as newborn weight below the 10th percentile on the Fenton growth chart. Detected SGA (dSGA) neonates were those that were admitted for delivery with a prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of abnormal growth. Undetected SGA (uSGA) were neonates that were found to be below the 10th percentile after birth. Perinatal and neonatal outcome was compared.

Results: The detection rate in high-risk pregnancies was almost 45.7% versus low risk where it amounted to 18.9%. In both the high-risk and low-risk populations there was a significantly higher risk of composite mortality for undetected SGA compared to approporiate-for-gestational-age (AGA) (OR 7.95 CI 4.76-13.29; OR 14.4 CI 4.99-41.45 respectively). The odds for the composite neonatal outcome were significantly higher for dSGA and uSGA than for AGA in all the studied populations except for the uSGA in high risk population (OR 1.57 CI 0.97-3.53). Importantly, there was not a single case of intrauterine fetal death among detected SGA, in the low risk group.

Conclusions: Prenatal detection of SGA status is related to perinatal outcomes, especially mortality. Therefore, assessment of SGA status even in low-risk pregnancies could help predict potential perinatal and neonatal complications.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0224553PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6822749PMC
March 2020

Development of birth weight for gestational age charts and comparison with currently used charts: defining growth in the Polish population.

J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2019 Oct 16:1-8. Epub 2019 Oct 16.

Department of Reproductive Health, Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, St. Sophia Hospital , Warsaw , Poland.

This study aimed to obtain the reference curves of birth weight for gestational age percentiles for the Polish population and to compare them to published charts in terms of detected proportions of small for gestational age (SGA) and large for gestational age (LGA). The reference curves of birth weight from 24 to 42 weeks of gestation were computed based on 39,092 singleton deliveries. The nomograms included the 3rd to the 97th percentiles and standard deviations. The percentiles were calculated for female and male newborns. The theoretical and true proportions of percentiles for the studied population were estimated based on six growth charts (Fenton, Intergrowth Project, global reference chart, Yudkin, Dubiel, and the World Health Organization chart). The 50th percentile male and female newborns at 40 weeks weighed 3645.8 and 3486.7 g, respectively. The difference was 159.1 g. The ranges between the 3rd and 97th percentile at 40 weeks were 1481.5 g for males and 1423.5 for females. A total of 9.8% SGA and 10.27% LGA were defined, higher than that identified using the Fenton chart and even higher than that identified using the Intergrowth Project. Population growth charts identify more newborns with abnormal growth (both LGA and SGA). The similarity between charts in LGA above the 95th percentile is observed. The discrepancies in SGA are significantly greater, specifically in preterm births than in term births. Similar coverage is found in term pregnancies, regardless of birth weight for gestational age or intrauterine charts. The feasibility of a Polish population growth chart needs to be validated for predicting adverse perinatal outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2019.1676412DOI Listing
October 2019

Combining mixture distribution and multidimensional IRTree models for the measurement of extreme response styles.

Br J Math Stat Psychol 2019 11 6;72(3):538-559. Epub 2019 Aug 6.

Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

Personality constructs, attitudes and other non-cognitive variables are often measured using rating or Likert-type scales, which does not come without problems. Especially in low-stakes assessments, respondents may produce biased responses due to response styles (RS) that reduce the validity and comparability of the measurement. Detecting and correcting RS is not always straightforward because not all respondents show RS and the ones who do may not do so to the same extent or in the same direction. The present study proposes the combination of a multidimensional IRTree model with a mixture distribution item response theory model and illustrates the application of the approach using data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). This joint approach allows for the differentiation between different latent classes of respondents who show different RS behaviours and respondents who show RS versus respondents who give (largely) unbiased responses. We illustrate the application of the approach by examining extreme RS and show how the resulting latent classes can be further examined using external variables and process data from computer-based assessments to develop a better understanding of response behaviour and RS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bmsp.12179DOI Listing
November 2019

Will the last be first and the first last? The role of classroom registers in cognitive skill acquisition.

PLoS One 2018 29;13(5):e0197746. Epub 2018 May 29.

European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Unit B4-Human Capital & Employment, Ispra, Italy.

The paper estimates the effect of students' position in the classroom register on their academic performance. We use a unique dataset from Poland which contains information on the academic outcomes of students in the humanities, science and mathematics lower secondary school exams as well as the position students occupy in their classroom register. We find that students whose names are recorded near the end of the class list have lower performance than those students whose names are recorded near the beginning of the list. The effect appears to be larger for performance in the humanities exam, and for low-achieving boys who attend large classes.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0197746PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973596PMC
December 2018

Education and Self-Reported Health: Evidence from 23 Countries on the Role of Years of Schooling, Cognitive Skills and Social Capital.

PLoS One 2016 22;11(2):e0149716. Epub 2016 Feb 22.

Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Science, Warsaw, Poland.

We examine the contribution of human capital to health in 23 countries worldwide using the OECD Survey of Adult Skills, a unique large-scale international assessment of 16-65 year olds that contains information about self-reported health, schooling, cognitive skills and indicators of interpersonal trust, which represents the cognitive dimension of social capital. We identify cross-national differences in education, skill and social capital gradients in self-reported health and explore the interaction between human capital and social capital to examine if and where social capital is a mediator or a moderator of years of schooling and cognitive abilities. We find large education gaps in self-reported health across all countries in our sample and a strong positive relationship between self-reported health and both literacy and trust in the majority of countries. Education and skill gradients in self-reported health appear to be largest in the United States and smallest in Italy, France, Sweden and Finland. On average around 5.5% of both the schooling gap in self-reported health and the literacy gap in self-reported health can be explained by the higher levels of interpersonal trust that better educated/more skilled individuals have, although the mediating role of trust varies considerably across countries. We find no evidence of a moderation effect: the relationships between health and years of schooling and health and cognitive skills are similar among individuals with different levels of trust.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0149716PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4763098PMC
July 2016

Heritability, family, school and academic achievement in adolescence.

Soc Sci Res 2015 Sep 16;53:73-88. Epub 2015 May 16.

School of Sociology, Research School of Social Sciences, College of Arts and Social Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia. Electronic address:

We demonstrate how genetically informed designs can be applied to administrative exam data to study academic achievement. ACE mixture latent class models have been used with Year 6 and 9 exam data for seven cohorts of Polish students which include 24,285 pairs of twins. Depending on a learning domain and classroom environment history, from 58% to 88% of variance in exam results is attributable to heritability, up to 34% to shared environment and from 8% to 15% depends on unique events in students' lives. Moreover, between 54% and 66% of variance in students' learning gains made between Years 6 and 9 is explained by heritability. The unique environment accounts for between 34% and 46% of that variance. However, we find no classroom effects on student progress made between Years 6 and 9. We situate this finding against the view that classroom peer groups and teachers matter for adolescent learning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ssresearch.2015.05.005DOI Listing
September 2015