Publications by authors named "Arrisna Artha"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Arthroscopic Biceps Tenodesis by Bicortical Drilling Technique.

Arthrosc Tech 2021 Apr 2;10(4):e941-e948. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University Hospital, Pathumthani, Thailand.

Pain arising from the long head of biceps tendon can cause significant disability of the shoulder. In young and physically demanding patients, biceps tenodesis is advised, in which the biceps tendon is cut from the native origin and fixed distally. Many methods have been proposed for this. This Technical Note describes arthroscopic biceps tenodesis in the bicipital groove by a bicortical drilling technique. The far cortex is breached only once by a guide wire, and the reamers do not breach the far cortex. The tendon is fixed in the new position using a PopLok anchor. This technique is safe and easy to perform but presents a learning curve.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eats.2020.11.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8084844PMC
April 2021

Arthroscopic Procedure for Chronic Isolated Bucket-Handle Meniscal Tears.

Arthrosc Tech 2021 Feb 29;10(2):e375-e383. Epub 2021 Jan 29.

Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University Hospital, Pathumthani, Thailand.

Arthroscopic treatment is the treatment of choice in bucket-handle meniscal tears (BHMTs). Following BHMT, however, surgery failure rates are approximately 20% in the literature. Achieving the healing of BHMT is difficult. This is worse in chronic situations because the torn meniscus is deformed, leading to nonanatomical reduction. Some authors have reported greater failure rates, especially in the early postoperative period. In isolated BHMTs, the failure rate is greater because of inadequate and incomplete repairs due to the tight medial compartment. Multiple techniques for possible reduction of failure rate have been described. We describe an arthroscopic technique for treating chronic isolated BHMT using the technique of subcutaneously releasing the posterior fibers of the medial collateral ligament to provide adequate space for arthroscopy, meniscal reduction, and repair. A combined inside-out and all-inside repair technique was used to enhance anatomic reduction, stable fixation, surface fixation (rather than the usual suture-points fixation), and biologic healing in repairable chronic BHMTs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eats.2020.10.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7917027PMC
February 2021

Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee: Arthroscopic Suture Anchor Fixation.

Arthrosc Tech 2020 Aug 7;9(8):e1203-e1209. Epub 2020 Aug 7.

Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand.

Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a subchondral bone abnormality, in which subchondral bone and the overlying articular cartilage detach from the bony bed. Multiple techniques for OCD fixation have been described, including metallic, bioabsorbable implants and biological fixation. We describe a surgical technique for OCD lesions including bony bed preparation with curettage and microfracture, anatomic reduction, and fixation using a suture anchor to provide stability and healing of the lesion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eats.2020.04.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7451442PMC
August 2020

Percutaneous Partial Outside-In Release of Medial Collateral Ligament for Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Surgery With Tight Medial Compartment by Finding a "Magic Point".

Arthrosc Tech 2020 Jul 9;9(7):e935-e940. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

Department of Orthopaedics, Thammasat University Hospital, Pathum Thani, Thailand.

The medial meniscus is one of the more commonly injured structures as compared with the lateral meniscus. In patients with tight medial joint space, it is difficult to visualize the posterior horn and posterior root of medial meniscus and even more difficult to use instrumentation for surgical procedures. Normally, the mean medial joint space (4.74 ± 0.75 mm) is less than the mean lateral joint space width (5.63 ± 0.86). Forceful instrumentation in a tight and a narrow medial joint compartment may cause damage to the articular cartilage, which may increase chances of arthritis in future. To increase the opening of the medial compartment after valgus extension stress position of the knee, different techniques of medial collateral ligament release have been described in the literature. However, the majority of articles describe a multiple-puncture method to the medial collateral ligament called the "pie-crusting" method, not explaining the exact point or precise location of release. Here, we describe a simple and reliable method of medial collateral ligament release by finding the exact release point, a "magic point" to increase the medial joint compartment width to facilitate better visualization and instrumentation for surgical procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eats.2020.03.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7372310PMC
July 2020

High grade acromioclavicular injury: Comparison of arthroscopic assisted acromioclavicular joint fixation and anatomic acromioclavicular joint reconstruction.

J Orthop 2020 Nov-Dec;22:151-157. Epub 2020 Apr 25.

Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University Hospital, Thailand.

Background: Injuries to the acromioclavicular (AC) joint disrupting the AC and Coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments could lead to loss of clavicular strut function. A High-grade AC joint injury remain challenging because of highly variety of treatment and limited evidence exists comparing clinical outcomes and complications after surgery.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and radiological outcome after arthroscopic assisted acromioclavicular Joint fixation and anatomic acromioclavicular joint reconstruction.

Study Design: Retrospective Clinical Cohort Study.

Methods: Twenty-nine patients with a high grade (Rockwood Type III-V) Acromioclavicular Joint Injury, operatively treated with arthroscopic assisted acromioclavicular joint fixation and anatomic acromioclavicular joint reconstruction from 2012 to 2018. The clinical assessment consists of Specific AC Score (SACS) and Nottingham Score. The radiographic evaluations were performed to evaluate the stability of reduction and the complications are assessed.

Results: There were a significant different between groups with AC joint reconstruction and fixation group (20 vs. 8, p < 0.005) and (19 vs. 10, p < 0.005) in SAC score and Nottingham score, respectively. There were no significant different in CC dstance between two groups. At the last follow up 6 patient develop loss of reduction with CC percentage >50% in AC joint fixation. Complication developed in 5 patients (17%) including 2 mild osteolysis, 1 superficial infection, 1 implant failure, and 1 clavicle fracture.

Conclusion: Anatomic AC joint reconstruction was associated with functional and radiologic benefits and better restored the stability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jor.2020.04.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7200614PMC
April 2020
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