Publications by authors named "Arnold M Evia"

5 Publications

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ARTS: A novel In-vivo classifier of arteriolosclerosis for the older adult brain.

Neuroimage Clin 2021 24;31:102768. Epub 2021 Jul 24.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, USA; Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology & Nuc Med, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address:

Brain arteriolosclerosis, one of the main pathologies of cerebral small vessel disease, is common in older adults and has been linked to lower cognitive and motor function and higher odds of dementia. In spite of its frequency and associated morbidity, arteriolosclerosis can only be diagnosed at autopsy. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to develop an in-vivo classifier of arteriolosclerosis based on brain MRI. First, an ex-vivo classifier of arteriolosclerosis was developed based on features related to white matter hyperintensities, diffusion anisotropy and demographics by applying machine learning to ex-vivo MRI and pathology data from 119 participants of the Rush Memory and Aging Project (MAP) and Religious Orders Study (ROS), two longitudinal cohort studies of aging that recruit non-demented older adults. The ex-vivo classifier showed good performance in predicting the presence of arteriolosclerosis, with an average area under the receiver operating characteristic curve AUC = 0.78. The ex-vivo classifier was then translated to in-vivo based on available in-vivo and ex-vivo MRI data on the same participants. The in-vivo classifier was named ARTS (short for ARTerioloSclerosis), is fully automated, and provides a score linked to the likelihood a person suffers from arteriolosclerosis. The performance of ARTS in predicting the presence of arteriolosclerosis in-vivo was tested in a separate, 91% dementia-free group of 79 MAP/ROS participants and exhibited an AUC = 0.79 in persons with antemortem intervals shorter than 2.4 years. This level of performance in mostly non-demented older adults is notable considering that arteriolosclerosis can only be diagnosed at autopsy. The scan-rescan reproducibility of the ARTS score was excellent, with an intraclass correlation of 0.99, suggesting that application of ARTS in longitudinal studies may show high sensitivity in detecting small changes. Finally, higher ARTS scores in non-demented older adults were associated with greater decline in cognition two years after baseline MRI, especially in perceptual speed which has been linked to arteriolosclerosis and small vessel disease. This finding was shown in a separate group of 369 non-demented MAP/ROS participants and was validated in 72 non-demented Black participants of the Minority Aging Research Study (MARS) and also in 244 non-demented participants of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2 and 3. The results of this work suggest that ARTS may have broad implications in the advancement of diagnosis, prevention and treatment of arteriolosclerosis. ARTS is publicly available at https://www.nitrc.org/projects/arts/.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2021.102768DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8329541PMC
September 2021

Neuropathologic Correlates of White Matter Hyperintensities in a Community-Based Cohort of Older Adults.

J Alzheimers Dis 2020 ;73(1):333-345

Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.

Background: The association of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) with age-related vascular and neurodegenerative pathologies remains incompletely understood.

Objective: The objective of this work was to elucidate the neuropathologic correlates of WMH in a large community-based cohort of older adults.

Methods: Cerebral hemispheres from 603 community-based older adults were imaged with MRI ex vivo. All participants underwent annual clinical evaluation, cognitive assessment, and neuropathologic examination. WMH burden was assessed using a modified Fazekas rating scale. Multiple ordinal logistic regression was used to test the association of WMH burden with an array of age-related neuropathologies, adjusting for demographics. Mixed effects models of cognition controlling for neuropathologies and demographics were used to determine whether WMH burden contributes to cognitive decline beyond measured pathologies.

Results: WMH burden in the whole group was associated with both vascular and Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathologies: arteriolosclerosis (p < 10-4), gross (p < 10-4), and microscopic infarcts (p = 0.04), and amyloid-β plaques (p = 0.028). In non-demented participants (mild or no cognitive impairment) (N = 332), WMH burden was related to gross infarcts (p = 10-4) and arteriolosclerosis (p < 10-4), but not to AD pathology. Similarly, in those with no cognitive impairment (N = 178), WMH burden was related to gross infarcts (p = 8×10-4) and arteriolosclerosis (p = 0.014). WMH burden was associated with faster decline in perceptual speed in both the whole (p = 0.038) and non-demented (p = 0.006) groups.

Conclusion: WMH burden has independent associations with vascular pathologies in older adults regardless of clinical status, and with AD pathology later in the progression of AD. Moreover, WMH burden may reflect additional tissue injury not captured with traditional neuropathologic indices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-190687DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6996196PMC
April 2021

Associations of amygdala volume and shape with transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) pathology in a community cohort of older adults.

Neurobiol Aging 2019 05 31;77:104-111. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, USA; Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address:

Transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) pathology is common in old age and is strongly associated with cognitive decline and dementia above and beyond contributions from other neuropathologies. TDP-43 pathology in aging typically originates in the amygdala, a brain region also affected by other age-related neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's pathology. The purpose of this study was two-fold: to determine the independent effects of TDP-43 pathology on the volume, as well as shape, of the amygdala in a community cohort of older adults, and to determine the contribution of amygdala volume to the variance of the rate of cognitive decline after accounting for the contributions of neuropathologies and demographics. Cerebral hemispheres from 198 participants of the Rush Memory and Aging Project and the Religious Orders Study were imaged with MRI ex vivo and underwent neuropathologic examination. Measures of amygdala volume and shape were extracted for all participants. Regression models controlling for neuropathologies and demographics showed an independent negative association of TDP-43 with the volume of the amygdala. Shape analysis revealed a unique pattern of amygdala deformation associated with TDP-43 pathology. Finally, mixed-effects models showed that amygdala volume explained an additional portion of the variance of the rate of decline in global cognition, episodic memory, semantic memory, and perceptual speed, above and beyond what was explained by demographics and neuropathologies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2019.01.022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6486844PMC
May 2019

Ex-vivo quantitative susceptibility mapping of human brain hemispheres.

PLoS One 2017 20;12(12):e0188395. Epub 2017 Dec 20.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, United States of America.

Ex-vivo brain quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) allows investigation of brain characteristics at essentially the same point in time as histopathologic examination, and therefore has the potential to become an important tool for determining the role of QSM as a diagnostic and monitoring tool of age-related neuropathologies. In order to be able to translate the ex-vivo QSM findings to in-vivo, it is crucial to understand the effects of death and chemical fixation on brain magnetic susceptibility measurements collected ex-vivo. Thus, the objective of this work was twofold: a) to assess the behavior of magnetic susceptibility in both gray and white matter of human brain hemispheres as a function of time postmortem, and b) to establish the relationship between in-vivo and ex-vivo gray matter susceptibility measurements on the same hemispheres. Five brain hemispheres from community-dwelling older adults were imaged ex-vivo with QSM on a weekly basis for six weeks postmortem, and the longitudinal behavior of ex-vivo magnetic susceptibility in both gray and white matter was assessed. The relationship between in-vivo and ex-vivo gray matter susceptibility measurements was investigated using QSM data from eleven older adults imaged both antemortem and postmortem. No systematic change in ex-vivo magnetic susceptibility of gray or white matter was observed over time postmortem. Additionally, it was demonstrated that, gray matter magnetic susceptibility measured ex-vivo may be well modeled as a linear function of susceptibility measured in-vivo. In conclusion, magnetic susceptibility in gray and white matter measured ex-vivo with QSM does not systematically change in the first six weeks after death. This information is important for future cross-sectional ex-vivo QSM studies of hemispheres imaged at different postmortem intervals. Furthermore, the linear relationship between in-vivo and ex-vivo gray matter magnetic susceptibility suggests that ex-vivo QSM captures information linked to antemortem gray matter magnetic susceptibility, which is important for translation of ex-vivo QSM findings to in-vivo.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0188395PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5737971PMC
January 2018

White Matter Integrity Reductions in Intermittent Explosive Disorder.

Neuropsychopharmacology 2016 10 20;41(11):2697-703. Epub 2016 May 20.

Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Intermittent explosive disorder (IED), as described in DSM-5, is the categorical expression of pathological impulsive aggression. Previous work has identified neurobiological correlates of the disorder in patterns of frontal-limbic brain activity and dysregulation of serotonergic neurotransmission. Given the importance of short- and-long range white matter connections of the brain in social and emotional behavior, studies of white matter connectivity in impulsive aggression are warranted. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies in the related conditions of antisocial and borderline personality disorder have produced preliminary evidence of disturbed white matter connectivity in these disorders, but to date there have been no DTI studies in IED. A total of 132 male and female adults between the ages of 18 and 55 years underwent Turboprop-DTI on a 3-Tesla MRI scanner. Of these, 42 subjects had IED, 40 were normal controls, and 50 were clinical psychiatric controls with psychiatric disorders without IED. All subjects were free of alcohol, psychotropic medications, or drugs of abuse. The diffusion tensor was calculated in each voxel and maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) were generated. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) were used to compare FA along the white matter skeleton among the three subject groups. IED was associated with lower FA in two clusters located in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) when compared with the psychiatric and healthy controls. Impulsive aggression and borderline personality disorder, but not psychopathy or antisocial personality disorder, was associated with lower FA in the two clusters within the SLF. In conclusion, IED was associated with lower white matter integrity in long-range connections between the frontal and temporoparietal regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2016.74DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5026737PMC
October 2016
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