Publications by authors named "Armando T Quitain"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Synergizing Sulfonated Hydrothermal Carbon and Microwave Irradiation for Intensified Esterification Reaction.

ACS Omega 2020 Sep 11;5(37):23542-23548. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

Bio-Circular-Green-economy Technology & Engineering Center, BCGeTEC, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.

The synergy of sulfonated hydrothermal carbon and microwave (MW) irradiation was applied for the esterification of oleic acid with methanol (MeOH) to produce biodiesel. The effects of temperature, reaction time, ratio of oleic acid to methanol, and catalyst loading were investigated at a fixed MW power of 400 W. The addition of hexane, serving as a co-solvent and separator, was also investigated. The optimum conditions for the proposed process were oleic acid-to-methanol molar ratio of 1:5 and hexane-to-methanol ratio of 0.5 (v/v) in the presence of a 5 wt % catalyst, at 100 °C for 60 min, obtaining a 97% yield of oleic acid methyl ester. The addition of slight amounts of hexane resulted into an eightfold reduction in the amount of MeOH needed to obtain a yield above 90%, which normally required a MeOH-to-oil ratio of 40:1. This proposed novel approach could provide a more cost-effective method for the esterification of oil to produce biodiesel, that is, reactive separation utilizing carbon-based catalysts under MW irradiation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.0c01660DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7512435PMC
September 2020

Biogasoline production from linoleic acid via catalytic cracking over nickel and copper-doped ZSM-5 catalysts.

Environ Res 2020 07 30;186:109616. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

Biomass Processing Lab, Center of Biofuel and Biochemical Research, Institute of Self-Sustainable Building, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 32610, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak, Malaysia.

Catalytic cracking of vegetable oil mainly processed over zeolites, and among all the zeolites particularly HZMS-5 has been investigated on wide range for renewable and clean gasoline production from various plant oils. Despite the fact that HZSM-5 offers a higher conversion degree and boost aromatics yield, the isomerate yield reduces due to high cracking activity and shape selectivity of HZSM-5. Hence, to overcome these problems, in this study the transition metals, such as nickel and copper doped over HZSM-5 were tested for its efficiencies to improve the isoparaffin compounds. The catalysts were screened with linoleic acid in a catalytic cracking reaction conducted at 450 C for 90 min in an atmospheric condition in batch reactor. Then, the gasoline composition of the organic liquid product (OLP) was analysed in terms of paraffin, isoparaffin, olefin, naphthenes and aromatics (PIONA). The results showed that Cu/ZSM-5 produced the highest liquid yield of 79.1%, at the same time reduced the production of gas and coke to 18.8% and 0.7%. Furthermore, the desired isoparaffin composition in biogasoline increased from 1.6% to 6.8% and at the same time reduced the oxygenated and aromatic compounds to 15.4% and 59.7%, respectively. The linoleic acid as model compound of rubber seed oil, in the catalytic cracking reaction provides a clearer understanding of the process. Besides, the water gas shift (WGS) reaction in catalytic cracking reaction provides insitu hydrogen production to saturate the branched olefin into the desired isoparaffin and the aromatics into naphthenes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2020.109616DOI Listing
July 2020

Recovery of cellulose fibers from oil palm empty fruit bunch for pulp and paper using green delignification approach.

Bioresour Technol 2019 Oct 12;290:121797. Epub 2019 Jul 12.

Biomass Processing Cluster, HICOE-Centre for Biofuel and Biochemical Research, Institute of Self-Sustainable Building, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Seri Iskandar, Perak 32610, Malaysia.

The aim of this work was to recover the cellulose fibers from EFB using low-transition-temperature-mixtures (LTTMs) as a green delignification approach. The hydrogen bonding of LTTMs observed in H NMR tends to disrupt the three-dimensional structure of lignin and further remove the lignin from EFB. Delignification process of EFB strands and EFB powder were performed using standard l-malic acid and cactus malic acid-LTTMs. The recovered cactus malic acid-LTTMs showed higher glucose concentration of 8.07 mg/mL than the recovered l-malic acid LTTMs (4.15 mg/mL). This implies that cactus malic acid-LTTMs had higher delignification efficiency which led to higher amount of cellulose hydrolyzed into glucose. The cactus malic acid-LTTMs-delignified EFB was the most feasible fibers for making paper due to its lowest kappa number of 69.84. The LTTMs-delignified EFB has great potential to be used for making specialty papers in pulp and paper industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2019.121797DOI Listing
October 2019

Production of gasoline range hydrocarbons from catalytic cracking of linoleic acid over various acidic zeolite catalysts.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2019 Nov 19;26(33):34039-34046. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Biomass Processing Laboratory, Center for Biofuel and Biochemical Research, Institute for Self-Sustainable Building, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Seri Iskandar, Perak, 32610, Malaysia.

Employment of edible oils as alternative green fuel for vehicles had raised debates on the sustainability of food supply especially in the third-world countries. The non-edible oil obtained from the abundantly available rubber seeds could mitigate this issue and at the same time reduce the environmental impact. Therefore, this paper investigates the catalytic cracking reaction of a model compound named linoleic acid that is enormously present in the rubber seed oil. Batch-scale experiments were conducted using 8.8 mL Inconel batch reactor having a cyclic horizontal swing span of 2 cm with a frequency of 60 cycles per minute at 450 °C under atmospheric condition for 90 min. The performance of HZSM-5, HBeta, HFerrierite, HMordenite and HY catalysts was tested for their efficiency in favouring gasoline range hydrocarbons. The compounds present in the organic liquid product were then analysed using GC-MS and classified based on PIONA which stands for paraffin, isoparaffin, olefin, naphthenes and aromatics respectively. The results obtained show that HZSM-5 catalyst favoured gasoline range hydrocarbons that were rich in aromatics compounds and promoted the production of desired isoparaffin. It also gave a higher cracking activity; however, large gaseous as by-products were produced at the same time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-018-3223-4DOI Listing
November 2019

Utilization of rice husk to enhance calcium oxide-based sorbent prepared from waste cockle shells for cyclic CO capture in high-temperature condition.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2019 Nov 28;26(33):33882-33896. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Advanced Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto, 860-855, Japan.

The CO capture capacity and cyclic stability of calcium oxide (CaO) prepared from cockle shells (CS) were enhanced by incorporating rice husk (RH) and binder through wet-mixing method. The cyclic reaction of calcination and carbonation was demonstrated using thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA) which the calcination was performed in a pure N environment at 850 °C for 20 min and carbonation at 650 °C for 30 min in 20 vol% of CO in N. The analysis using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) identified silica (Si) as the major elements in the sorbents. The RH-added sorbents also contained several types of metal elements such as which was a key factor to minimize the sintering of the sorbent during the cyclic reaction and contributed to higher CO capture capacity. The presence of various morphologies also associated with the improvement of the synthesized sorbents performance. The highest initial CO capture capacity was exhibited by CS+10%RH sorbent, which was 12% higher than the RH-free sorbent (CS). However, sorbents with the higher RH loading amount such as 40 and 50 wt% were preferred to maintain high capture capacity when the sorbents were regenerated and extended to the cyclic reaction. The sorbents also demonstrated the lowest average sorption decay, which suggested the most stable sorbent for cyclic-reaction. Once regenerated, the capture capacity of the RH-added sorbent was further increased by 12% when clay was added into the sorbent. Overall, the metal elements in RH and clay were possibly the key factor that enhances the performance of CaO prepared from CS, particularly for cyclic CO capture. Graphical abstract Cyclic calcination and carbonation reaction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-018-2549-2DOI Listing
November 2019

Sustainable green pretreatment approach to biomass-to-energy conversion using natural hydro-low-transition-temperature mixtures.

Bioresour Technol 2018 Aug 12;261:361-369. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Advanced Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555, Japan.

Natural hydro-low-transition-temperature mixtures (NH-LTTMs) tend to be the most favorable next-generation green solvents for biomass pretreatment, as they are cheap and environmental friendly. The amount of water bound into the NH-LTTMs greatly affected their thermal stability, whereby the highest thermal stability was observed with the water content of 7.6 wt%. It is worth noting that, the highest molar transition energy of NH-LTTMs (47.57 kcal mol), which indicated the highest solubility, was optimized with the molar ratio of hydrogen bond donor (HBD)-hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA)-water (2:4:3) at a temperature of 60 °C. Hydrogen bonding networks of the NH-LTTMs, which led to the dissolution of biomass, were confirmed by the alteration in the peaks of the involved bonds and resonance signal to lower field through FTIR and H NMR spectra, respectively. The components evidenced in high-resolution mass spectra of extracted lignin showed its high potential to be valorized into useful fuels and chemicals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2018.04.039DOI Listing
August 2018

Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic modeling of low-transition-temperature mixtures pretreated oil palm empty fruit bunch for possible maximum yield of pyrolysis oil.

Bioresour Technol 2018 May 31;255:189-197. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Advanced Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555, Japan.

The impacts of low-transition-temperature mixtures (LTTMs) pretreatment on thermal decomposition and kinetics of empty fruit bunch (EFB) were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. EFB was pretreated with the LTTMs under different duration of pretreatment which enabled various degrees of alteration to their structure. The TG-DTG curves showed that LTTMs pretreatment on EFB shifted the temperature and rate of decomposition to higher values. The EFB pretreated with sucrose and choline chloride-based LTTMs had attained the highest mass loss of volatile matter (78.69% and 75.71%) after 18 h of pretreatment. For monosodium glutamate-based LTTMs, the 24 h pretreated EFB had achieved the maximum mass loss (76.1%). Based on the Coats-Redfern integral method, the LTTMs pretreatment led to an increase in activation energy of the thermal decomposition of EFB from 80.00 to 82.82-94.80 kJ/mol. The activation energy was mainly affected by the demineralization and alteration in cellulose crystallinity after LTTMs pretreatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2018.01.132DOI Listing
May 2018

Choline chloride (ChCl) and monosodium glutamate (MSG)-based green solvents from optimized cactus malic acid for biomass delignification.

Bioresour Technol 2017 Nov 10;244(Pt 1):941-948. Epub 2017 Aug 10.

Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Advanced Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555, Japan.

This work aimed to develop an efficient microwave-hydrothermal (MH) extraction of malic acid from abundant natural cactus as hydrogen bond donor (HBD) whereby the concentration was optimized using response surface methodology. The ideal process conditions were found to be at a solvent-to-feed ratio of 0.008, 120°C and 20min with 1.0g of oxidant, HO. Next generation environment-friendly solvents, low transition temperature mixtures (LTTMs) were synthesized from cactus malic acid with choline chloride (ChCl) and monosodium glutamate (MSG) as hydrogen bond acceptors (HBAs). The hydrogen-bonding interactions between the starting materials were determined. The efficiency of the LTTMs in removing lignin from oil palm biomass residues, empty fruit bunch (EFB) was also evaluated. The removal of amorphous hemicellulose and lignin after the pretreatment process resulted in an enhanced digestibility and thermal degradability of biomass.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2017.08.043DOI Listing
November 2017

Characterization of natural low transition temperature mixtures (LTTMs): Green solvents for biomass delignification.

Bioresour Technol 2016 Jan 1;199:258-264. Epub 2015 Aug 1.

Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555, Japan. Electronic address:

The aim of this work was to characterize the natural low transition temperature mixtures (LTTMs) as promising green solvents for biomass pretreatment with the critical characteristics of cheap, biodegradable and renewable, which overcome the limitations of ionic liquids (ILs). The LTTMs were derived from inexpensive commercially available hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) and l-malic acid as the hydrogen bond donor (HBD) in distinct molar ratios of starting materials and water. The peaks involved in the H-bonding shifted and became broader for the OH groups. The thermal properties of the LTTMs were not affected by water while the biopolymers solubility capacity of LTTMs was improved with the increased molar ratio of water and treatment temperature. The pretreatment of oil palm biomass was consistence with the screening on solubility of biopolymers. This work provides a cost-effective alternative to utilize microwave hydrothermal extracted green solvents such as malic acid from natural fruits and plants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2015.07.103DOI Listing
January 2016

Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of fucoxanthin from Undaria pinnatifida.

J Agric Food Chem 2013 Jun 6;61(24):5792-7. Epub 2013 Jun 6.

Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University , Kumamoto 860-855, Japan.

Undaria pinnatifida, commonly known as wakame in Japan, is one species of brown seaweeds containing valuable bioactive organic compounds such as fucoxanthin, a carotenoid, which has numerous functional properties. However, most of the seaweeds that do not meet strict quality standards are normally discarded as wastes or returned to the sea, a situation which is becoming an environmental concern. In this research, supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO₂) extraction was investigated for the isolation of fucoxanthin. SCCO₂ extraction experiments were carried out at temperature range of 25-60 °C and pressure range of 20-40 MPa, at a carbon dioxide flow rate of 1.0-4.0 mL/min. Results showed that fucoxanthin recovery closed to 80% could be obtained at 40 °C and 40 MPa in extraction time of 180 min. The recovery increased with decreasing temperature and increasing pressure. Pretreatment with microwave (MW) also enhanced the efficiency of extraction due most likely to disruption of the cell membrane. Application of SCCO₂, generally regarded as safe and environmentally benign solvent, for extraction of useful bioactive compounds from unwanted or substandard seaweeds look promising in the near future. The extracts obtained using the method can be utilized as food and pharmaceutical additive, and can be used in the development of new health supplements.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf400740pDOI Listing
June 2013

Polyphenolic contents and antioxidant activities of Lawsonia inermis leaf extracts obtained by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method.

J Microw Power Electromagn Energy 2011 ;45(4):193-204

Bioelectrics Research Center, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.

Extracts obtained by microwave-assisted hydrothermal extraction of Lawsonia inermis leaves were evaluated for the presence of polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activities. Extraction experiments were performed in temperature-controlled mode at a range of 100 to 200 degrees C, and extraction time of 5 to 30 min, and microwave-controlled mode at a power from 300-700 W, in irradiation time of 30 to 120 s. Polyphenolic contents were measured using Folin-Ciocalteau method, while antioxidant properties were analyzed using DPPH radical scavenging activities (RSA) expressed in BHA equivalents. Results showed that best values of RSA were obtained at mild temperature range of 100-120 degrees C. Controlling microwave power at short irradiation time gave better results than temperature-controlled treatment as well. Furthermore, comparison with the result obtained at room temperature confirmed that the use of microwave was more effective for extracting polar components that normally possess higher antioxidant activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08327823.2011.11689814DOI Listing
February 2014

Recovery of oil components of okara by ethanol-modified supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

Bioresour Technol 2006 Sep 15;97(13):1509-14. Epub 2005 Aug 15.

Research Institute for Solvothermal Technology, Takamatsu, Kagawa, Japan.

Recovery of the oil components of okara by ethanol-modified supercritical carbon dioxide extraction was investigated at 40-80 degrees C temperature and 12-30 MPa pressure. In a typical run (holding period of 2 h, continuous flow extraction of 5 h), results indicated that the oil component could be best obtained with a recovery of 63.5% at relatively low temperature of 40 degrees C and mild pressure of 20 MPa in the presence of 10 mol% EtOH as entrainer. Based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, the extracts consisted mainly of fatty acids and phytosterols, and traces of decadienal. Folin-Ciocalteau estimates of total phenols showed that addition of EtOH as entrainer increased the yield and the amount of phenolic compounds in the extracts. The amounts of two primary soy isoflavones, genistein and daidzein, in the extracts also increased with increasing amount of EtOH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2005.06.010DOI Listing
September 2006

Metal elution from Ni- and Fe-based alloy reactors under hydrothermal conditions.

J Hazard Mater 2004 May;108(3):213-6

Department of Ecological Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, G-614 Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580, Japan.

Elution of metals from Ni- and Fe-based alloy (i.e. Inconel 625 and SUS 316) under hydrothermal conditions was investigated. Results showed that metals could be eluted even in a short contact time. At subcritical conditions, a significant amount of Cr was extracted from SUS 316, while only traces of Ni, Fe, Mo, and Mn were eluted. In contrast, Ni was removed in significant amounts compared to Cr when Inconel 625 was tested. Several factors including temperature and contact time were found to affect elution behavior. The presence of air in the fluid even promoted elution under subcritical conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2004.02.028DOI Listing
May 2004

Qualitative investigation on hydrothermal treatment of Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) bark for production of useful chemicals.

J Agric Food Chem 2003 Dec;51(27):7926-9

Department of Ecological Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580, Japan.

Hydrothermal treatment of an outer layer of a bark of Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) tree was investigated qualitatively for the possibility of utilizing residual forest biomass to produce valuable chemicals. Experiments were carried out in a semibatch reactor apparatus that allows the study of the effect of reaction temperatures in a single run. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses show the presence of useful chemicals such as furfural, aromatic compounds (1,3-di-tert-butyl benzene and 2,4-di-tert-butyl phenol), and fatty acids (myristic acid, palmitic acid, and stearic acid) in the products.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf021014mDOI Listing
December 2003

Low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids produced from hydrothermal treatment of organic wastes.

J Hazard Mater 2002 Jul;93(2):209-20

Department of Ecological Engineering (G-614), Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, 441-8580, Toyohashi, Japan.

This article reports production of low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids from the hydrothermal treatment of representative organic wastes and compounds (i.e. domestic sludge, proteinaceous, cellulosic and plastic wastes) with or without oxidant (H(2)O(2)). Organic acids such as acetic, formic, propionic, succinic and lactic acids were obtained in significant amounts. At 623 K (16.5 MPa), acetic acid of about 26 mg/g dry waste fish entrails was obtained. This increased to 42 mg/g dry waste fish entrails in the presence of H(2)O(2). Experiments on glucose to represent cellulosic wastes were also carried out, getting acetic acid of about 29 mg/g glucose. The study was extended to terephthalic acid and glyceraldehyde, reaction intermediates of hydrothermal treatment of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic wastes and glucose, respectively. In addition, production of lactic acid, one of the interesting low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids, was discussed on the viewpoint of resources recovery. Studies on temperature dependence of formation of organic acids showed thermal stability of acetic acid, whereas, formic acid decomposed readily under hydrothermal conditions. In general, results demonstrated that the presence of oxidants favored formation of organic acids with acetic acid being the major product.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0304-3894(02)00024-9DOI Listing
July 2002
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