Publications by authors named "Arkadiusz Kopiejć"

6 Publications

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Author Correction: Risk factors for serious morbidity, prolonged length of stay and hospital readmission after laparoscopic appendectomy - results from Pol-LA (Polish Laparoscopic Appendectomy) multicenter large cohort study.

Sci Rep 2019 Dec 6;9(1):18479. Epub 2019 Dec 6.

2nd Department of General Surgery, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-54993-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6897885PMC
December 2019

Risk factors for serious morbidity, prolonged length of stay and hospital readmission after laparoscopic appendectomy - results from Pol-LA (Polish Laparoscopic Appendectomy) multicenter large cohort study.

Sci Rep 2019 10 15;9(1):14793. Epub 2019 Oct 15.

2nd Department of General Surgery, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland.

Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) for treatment of acute appendicitis has gained acceptance with its considerable benefits over open appendectomy. LA, however, can involve some adverse outcomes: morbidity, prolonged length of hospital stay (LOS) and hospital readmission. Identification of predictive factors may help to identify and tailor treatment for patients with higher risk of these adverse events. Our aim was to identify risk factors for serious morbidity, prolonged LOS and hospital readmission after LA. A database compiled information of patients admitted for acute appendicitis from eighteen Polish and German surgical centers. It included factors related to the patient characteristics, peri- and postoperative period. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors for serious perioperative complications, prolonged LOS, and hospital readmissions in acute appendicitis cases. 4618 laparoscopic appendectomy patients were included. First, although several risk factors for serious perioperative complications (C-D III-V) were found in the univariate analysis, in the multivariate model only the presence of intraoperative adverse events (OR 4.09, 95% CI 1.32-12.65, p = 0.014) and complicated appendicitis (OR 3.63, 95% CI 1.74-7.61, p = 0.001) was statistically significant. Second, prolonged LOS was associated with the presence of complicated appendicitis (OR 2.8, 95% CI: 1.53-5.12, p = 0.001), postoperative morbidity (OR 5.01, 95% CI: 2.33-10.75, p < 0.001), conversions (OR 6.48, 95% CI: 3.48-12.08, p < 0.001) and reinterventions after primary procedure (OR 8.79, 95% CI: 3.2-24.14, p < 0.001) in the multivariate model. Third, although several risk factors for hospital readmissions were found in univariate analysis, in the multivariate model only the presence of postoperative complications (OR 10.33, 95% CI: 4.27-25.00), reintervention after primary procedure (OR 5.62, 95% CI: 2.17-14.54), and LA performed by resident (OR 1.96, 95% CI: 1.03-3.70) remained significant. Laparoscopic appendectomy is a safe procedure associated with low rates of complications, prolonged LOS, and readmissions. Risk factors for these adverse events include complicated appendicitis, postoperative morbidity, conversion, and re-intervention after the primary procedure. Any occurrence of these factors during treatment should alert the healthcare team to identify the patients that require more customized treatment to minimize the risk for adverse outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-51172-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6794313PMC
October 2019

The significant impact of age on the clinical outcomes of laparoscopic appendectomy: Results from the Polish Laparoscopic Appendectomy multicenter large cohort study.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 Dec;97(50):e13621

Faculty of Health Sciences, Powiślańska School in Kwidzyn, Kwidzyn.

Acute appendicitis (AA) is the most common surgical emergency and can occur at any age. Nearly all of the studies comparing outcomes of appendectomy between younger and older patients set cut-off point at 65 years. In this multicenter observational study, we aimed to compare laparoscopic appendectomy for AA in various groups of patients with particular interest in the elderly and very elderly in comparison to younger adults.Our multicenter observational study of 18 surgical units assessed the outcomes of 4618 laparoscopic appendectomies for AA. Patients were divided in 4 groups according to their age: Group 1-<40 years old; Group 2-between 40 and 64 years old; Group 3-between 65 and 74 years old; and Group 4-75 years old or older. Groups were compared in terms of peri- and postoperative outcomes.The ratio of complicated appendicitis grew with age (20.97% vs 37.50% vs 43.97% vs 56.84%, P < .001). Similarly, elderly patients more frequently suffered from perioperative complications (5.06% vs 9.3% vs 10.88% vs 13.68%, P < .001) and had the longest median length of stay (3 [Interquartile Range (IQR) 2-4] vs 3 [IQR 3-5], vs 4 [IQR 3-5], vs 5 [IQR 3-6], P < .001) as well as the rate of patients with prolonged length of hospital stay (LOS) >8 days. Logistic regression models comparing perioperative results of each of the 3 oldest groups compared with the youngest one showed significant differences in odds ratios of symptoms lasting >48 hours, presence of complicated appendicitis, perioperative morbidity, conversion rate, prolonged LOS (>8 days).The findings of this study confirm that the outcomes of laparoscopic approach to AA in different age groups are not the same regarding outcomes and the clinical picture. Older patients are at high risk both in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative period. The differences are visible already at the age of 40 years old. Since delayed diagnosis and postponed surgery result in the development of complicated appendicitis, more effort should be placed in improving treatment patterns for the elderly and their clinical outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000013621DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6320074PMC
December 2018

[Appendicitis and gall bladder diseases as acute abdominal conditions in pregnancy].

Ginekol Pol 2013 Dec;84(12):1045-50

Gdański Uniwersytet Medyczny, Klinika Połoznictwa, Gdańsk, Polska.

Appendicitis (APP) and gall bladder diseases (GBD) are the most frequent non-obstetric indications for urgent surgery among pregnant women. The aim was to present the diagnosis, treatment and potential complications of APP and symptomatic GBD. We searched the literature for APP and GBD during pregnancy and presented the results in the form of a review article. APP symptoms among pregnant women are comparable to these in the general population. Typical clinical symptoms are present in 50-75% of cases. Laboratory tests are useful for a differential diagnosis. The imaging of choice is an ultrasonography scan, but magnetic resonance is of the highest accuracy The final diagnosis is difficult. When the surgery is delayed, the risk of appendix perforation increases and thus complications are more frequent. GBD symptoms and signs are comparable to those in the general population. The best imaging is an ultrasonography scan, and laboratory tests are important in a jaundice differential diagnosis. In cases with symptomatic GBD, a delay in surgery is associated with an increased risk of complications (pancreatitis, abortion, intrauterine death). The treatment method of choice for APP and symptomatic GBD is surgery both laparotomy and laparoscopy (preferred), which are considered relatively safe, though laparoscopy compared to laparotomy for APP can be associated with a higher risk of abortion. Untreated or delayed APP and symptomatic GBD treatment during pregnancy increases the risk of complications, both for the woman and the fetus. Diagnosis is difficult and should be based on a multidisciplinary approach to the patient. Surgery by laparotomy or laparoscopy is relatively safe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17772/gp/1678DOI Listing
December 2013

[Intestinal obstruction during pregnancy].

Ginekol Pol 2013 Feb;84(2):137-41

Szpital Morski im. PCK, Gdyńskie Centrum Onkologii, Oddział Ginekologii Onkologicznej, Gdynia, Polska.

This is a review of literature concerning intestinal obstruction in pregnant women. Approximately 50-90% and 30% of pregnant women, respectively suffer from nausea and vomiting, mostly during the first trimester. There is also increased risk of constipation. During the perioperative period, the administration of tocolytics should be considered only in women showing symptoms of a threatening premature delivery. Intensive hydration should be ordered to sustain uterine blood flow. The incidence of intestinal obstruction during pregnancy is estimated at 1:1500-1:66431 pregnancies and is diagnosed in II and III trimester in most cases. However, it can also occur in the I trimester (6%) or puerperium. Symptoms of intestinal obstruction in pregnancy include: abdominal pains (98%), vomiting (82%), constipation (30%). Abdominal tenderness on palpation is found in 71% and abnormal peristalsis in 55% of cases. The most common imaging examination in the diagnosis of intestinal obstruction is the abdominal X-ray. However ionizing radiation may have a harmful effect on the fetus, especially during the first trimester. X-ray is positive for intestinal obstruction in 82% of pregnant women. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are considered safe and applicable during pregnancy. Intestinal obstruction in pregnant women is mostly caused by: adhesions (54.6%), intestinal torsion (25%), colorectal carcinoma (3.7%), hernia (1.4%), appendicitis (0.5%) and others (10%). Adhesive obstruction occurs more frequently in advanced pregnancy (6% - I trimester 28% - II trimester; 45% - III trimester 21% - puerperium). Treatment should begin with conservative procedures. Surgical treatment may be necessary in cases where the pain turns from recurrent into continuous, with tachycardia, pyrexia and a positive Blumberg sign. If symptoms of fetal anoxia are observed, a C-section should be carried out before surgical intervention. The extent of surgical intervention depends on the intraoperative evaluation. Intestinal torsion during pregnancy mostly occurs in the sigmoid colon and cecum. Small bowel torsion secondary to adhesions is diagnosed in 42% of pregnant women with intestinal obstruction. The risk of intestinal torsion is higher in the 16-20 and 32-36 weeks of pregnancy and during puerperium. Intestinal torsion results in vessel occlusion which induces more severe symptoms and makes urgent surgical intervention necessary. The overall prognosis is poor--during II and III trimester the fetal mortality rate reaches 36% and 64%, respectively while the risk of maternal death is 6%. Acute intestinal pseudoobstruction can be diagnosed during puerperium, especially following a C-section. Diagnosis is made on the basis of radiological confirmation of colon distension at the cecum as > 9cm, lack of air in the sigmoid colon and rectum, exclusion of mechanical obstruction. In most cases, the treatment is based on easing intestine gas evacuation and administering neostigmine. The authors point out the need for multi-specialty cooperation in the diagnostic-therapeutic process of pregnant women suspected with intestinal obstruction, since any delay in making a correct diagnosis increases the risk of severe complications, both for the woman and the fetus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17772/gp/1554DOI Listing
February 2013

Totally laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy - a technique modification.

Wideochir Inne Tech Maloinwazyjne 2011 Dec 20;6(4):256-60. Epub 2011 Dec 20.

Department of Oncological Surgery, Hospital of Medical University of Gdansk, Poland.

In oncological patients with upper gastrointestinal tract tumours, dysphagia and cachexy necessitate gastrostomy or jejunostomy as the only options of enteral access for long-term feeding. In this article the authors describe a modified technique of laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy applied during the staging laparoscopy. A 48-year-old male patient with gastroesophageal junction tumour and a 68-year-old male patient with oesophageal tumour were operated on using the described technique. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed. Then the feeding jejunostomy was made using a Cystofix(®) TUR catheter. The jejunum was fixed to the abdominal wall with four 2.0 Novafil™ transabdominal stitches. Two additional sutures were placed caudally about 4 cm and 8 cm from the jejunostomy, aiming at prevention of jejunal torsion. Total operating time was 45 min. There was no blood loss. There were no intraoperative complications. The only adverse event was one jejunostomy wound infection that responded well to oral antibiotics. There were no mortalities. The described technique has most of the benefits of laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy with some steps added from the open operation making the procedure easier to perform as part of a staging operation with a relatively short additional operating time. The proposed transabdominal stitches make the technique easier to apply. Two additional 'anti-torsion sutures' prevent postoperative volvulus. Use of the Cystofix catheter allows easy introduction of the catheter into the peritoneal cavity and the jejunal lumen, providing a good seal at the same time. Further studies on larger groups of patients are required to assess long-term outcomes of the proposed modified technique.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/wiitm.2011.26262DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3516942PMC
December 2011