Publications by authors named "Arijit Barman"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Soil spatial variability characterization: Delineating index-based management zones in salt-affected agroecosystem of India.

J Environ Manage 2021 Jul 13;296:113243. Epub 2021 Jul 13.

ICAR-Central Soil Salinity Research Institute, Karnal, 132001, Haryana, India.

Farm level recommendation in salt-affected agricultural landscapes is practically difficult due to spatial variations in inherent soil salinity, diverse farming situations and associated land ownerships with small-scale production systems. This study presents spatial array analysis of 354 geo-referenced soil samples revealing widespread heterogeneity in soil sodicity and fertility status across salt-affected Ghaghar basin of Kaithal district in Haryana, India. Six principal components accounted for 73% of the total variability, and the most important contributors [electrical conductivity (EC), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), DTPA extractable copper (Cu) and boron (B), soil organic carbon (OC) and available phosphorus (AP)] as minimum data set were used to develop the soil quality index (SQI). Geostatistical analysis revealed Circular (EC and AP), Exponential (SAR, OC and B) and Gaussian (Cu) as the best fit semivariogram ordinary kriging model with weak to moderate spatial dependence. Three soil management zones (SMZs) were delineated by grouping the entire area based on soil quality index (SQI). Fertilizer recommendations for rice-wheat cropping system in different SMZs were calculated using soil test crop response (STCR) equation to ensure balanced fertilization, resource saving and reducing environmental footprints. Gypsum requirement map was prepared for systematic allocation and distribution, and enabling farmers to precisely use the mineral gypsum in order to reclaim and reduce stresses led by sodic lands. The implications of this study showed zone-specific advocacy for gypsum application (as soil ameliorant) and balanced fertilization in sustainable restoration of sodic lands, improving nutrient use efficiency and stabilizing crop production in salt-affected regions of India and similar ecologies elsewhere.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2021.113243DOI Listing
July 2021

Spatial variability of arsenic in Indo-Gangetic basin of Varanasi and its cancer risk assessment.

Chemosphere 2020 Jan 19;238:124623. Epub 2019 Aug 19.

Division of Agricultural Physics, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, 110012, India.

The Indo-Gangetic alluvium is prime region for intensive agricultural. In some areas of this region, groundwater is now becoming progressively polluted by contamination with poisonous substances like arsenic. Intensive irrigation with arsenic contaminated ground water in dry spell results in the formation of As(III) which is more toxic. Thus groundwater quality assessment of Gangetic basin has become essential for its safer use. Therefore we under took study on the spatial variability of arsenic by collecting georeferred groundwater samples on grid basis from various water sources like dug well, bore and hand pumps covering the river bank region of Ganga basin. Water quality was investigated through determination pH, EC, TDS, salinity, Na, K, Ca, Mg, SAR, SSP, CO, HCO, RSC, Cl, As, Fe, Zn, Mn and Cu, etc. Results pointed severe As contamination in ground water of three sites of the study area. ARC GIS software is now able to process maps along with tabular data and compare them well, to provide the spatial visualization of information and using this tool, the Geographical Information System (GIS) of arsenic was developed. It was noticed from spatial maps that concentration of arsenic was more near the meandering points of Ganga.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.124623DOI Listing
January 2020

Fe-exchanged nano-bentonite outperforms FeO nanoparticles in removing nitrate and bicarbonate from wastewater.

J Hazard Mater 2019 08 13;376:141-152. Epub 2019 May 13.

ICAR-Central Soil Salinity Research Institute, Karnal 132001, India.

Nitrate (NO) and bicarbonate (HCO) are harmful for the water quality and can potentially create negative impacts to aquatic organisms, crops and humans. This study deals with the removal of NO and HCO from contaminated wastewater using Fe-exchanged nano-bentonite and FeO nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, surface area measurement and particle size analysis revealed that the adsorbents fall under the nano-scale size range with high specific surface area, and Fe was successfully exchanged in the nano-bentonite clay. The kinetics of adsorption was well defined by pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models for both NO and HCO. The Fe-exchanged nano-bentonite was a better performing adsorbent of the oxyanions than FeO nanoparticles. According to the Sips isothermal model, the Fe-exchanged nano-bentonite exhibited the highest NO and HCO adsorption potential of 64.76 mg g and 9.73 meq g, respectively, while the respective values for FeO nanoparticles were 49.90 mg g and 3.07 meq g. Thus, inexpensiveness and easy preparation process of Fe-exchanged nano-bentonite make it attractive for NO and HCO removal from contaminated wastewater with significant environmental and economic benefits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2019.05.025DOI Listing
August 2019
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