Publications by authors named "Ariadne Cristiane Cabral da Cruz"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Number of dental abutments influencing the biomechanical behavior of tooth‒implant-supported fixed partial dentures: A finite element analysis.

J Dent Res Dent Clin Dent Prospects 2020 7;14(4):228-234. Epub 2020 Dec 7.

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Local or systemic issues might prevent installing a sufficient number of dental implants for fixed prosthetic rehabilitation. Splinting dental implants and natural teeth in fixed dentures could overcome such limitations. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the influence of the number of dental abutments in the biomechanics of tooth‒implant-supported fixed partial dentures (FPDs). The null hypothesis was that increasing the number of abutment teeth would not decrease the stress over the abutments and surrounding bone. Left mandibular lateral incisor, canine, premolars, and molars were reconstructed through computed tomography and edited using image processing software to represent a cemented fixed metal‒ceramic partial denture. Three models were set to reduce the number of abutment teeth: 1) lateral incisor, canine, and first premolar; 2) canine and first premolar; 3) the first premolar. The second premolar and first molar were set as pontics, and the second molar was set as an implant abutment in all the models. Finite element analyses were performed under physiologic masticatory forces with axial and oblique loading vectors. After simulation of axial loads, the stress peaks on the bone around the implant, the bone around the first premolar, and prosthetic structures did not exhibit significant changes when the number of abutment teeth decreased. However, under oblique loads, decreasing the number of abutment teeth increased stress peaks on the surrounding bone and denture. Increasing the number of dental abutments in tooth‒implant-supported cemented FPD models decreased stresses on its constituents, favoring the prosthetic biomechanics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.34172/joddd.2020.047DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7867679PMC
December 2020

Effect of dexamethasone as osteogenic supplementation in in vitro osteogenic differentiation of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2021 Jan 19;32(1). Epub 2021 Jan 19.

Center for Research on Dental Implants, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Delfino Conti Street, Florianópolis, 88040-900, Brazil.

In in vitro culture systems, dexamethasone (DEX) has been applied with ascorbic acid (ASC) and β-glycerophosphate (βGLY) as culture media supplementation to induce osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. However, there are some inconsistencies regarding the role of DEX as osteogenic media supplementation. Therefore, this study verified the influence of DEX culture media supplementation on the osteogenic differentiation, especially the capacity to mineralize the extracellular matrix of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED). Five groups were established: G1-SHED + Dulbecco's Modified Eagles' Medium (DMEM) + fetal bovine serum (FBS); G2-SHED + DMEM + FBS + DEX; G3-SHED + DMEM + FBS + ASC + βGLY; G4-SHED + DMEM + FBS + ASC + βGLY + DEX; G5-MC3T3-E1 + α Minimal Essential Medium (MEM) + FBS + ASC + βGLY. DNA content, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, free calcium quantification in the extracellular medium, and extracellular matrix mineralization quantification through staining with von Kossa, alizarin red, and tetracycline were performed on days 7 and 21. Osteogenic media supplemented with ASC and β-GLY demonstrated similar effects on SHED in the presence or absence of DEX for DNA content (day 21) and capacity to mineralize the extracellular matrix according to alizarin red and tetracycline quantifications (day 21). In addition, the presence of DEX in the osteogenic medium promoted less ALP activity (day 7) and extracellular matrix mineralization according to the von Kossa assay (day 21), and more free calcium quantification at extracellular medium (day 21). In summary, the presence of DEX in the osteogenic media supplementation did not interfere with SHED commitment into mineral matrix depositor cells. We suggest that DEX may be omitted from culture media supplementation for SHED osteogenic differentiation in vitro studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-020-06475-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7815568PMC
January 2021

Extremophile Microbial Communities and Enzymes for Bioenergetic Application Based on Multi-Omics Tools.

Curr Genomics 2020 May;21(4):240-252

1Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Parasitology, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 2Laboratory of Microbiology and Bioprocess, Federal University of Fronteira Sul, Erechim, RS, Brazil; 3Department of Chemical and Food Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 4Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil.

Genomic and proteomic advances in extremophile microorganism studies are increasingly demonstrating their ability to produce a variety of enzymes capable of converting biomass into bioenergy. Such microorganisms are found in environments with nutritional restrictions, anaerobic environments, high salinity, varying pH conditions and extreme natural environments such as hydrothermal vents, soda lakes, and Antarctic sediments. As extremophile microorganisms and their enzymes are found in widely disparate locations, they generate new possibilities and opportunities to explore biotechnological prospecting, including biofuels (biogas, hydrogen and ethanol) with an aim toward using multi-omics tools that shed light on biotechnological breakthroughs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1389202921999200601144137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7521039PMC
May 2020

PLGA+HA/βTCP Scaffold Incorporating Simvastatin: A Promising Biomaterial for Bone Tissue Engineering.

J Oral Implantol 2021 Apr;47(2):93-101

Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil.

The aim of this study was to synthesize, characterize, and evaluate degradation and biocompatibility of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) + hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (PLGA+HA/βTCP) scaffolds incorporating simvastatin (SIM) to verify if this biomaterial might be promising for bone tissue engineering. Samples were obtained by the solvent evaporation technique. Biphasic ceramic particles (70% HA, 30% βTCP) were added to PLGA in a ratio of 1:1. Samples with SIM received 1% (m/m) of this medication. Scaffolds were synthesized in a cylindric shape and sterilized by ethylene oxide. For degradation analysis, samples were immersed in phosphate-buffered saline at 37°C under constant stirring for 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Nondegraded samples were taken as reference. Mass variation, scanning electron microscopy, porosity analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetry were performed to evaluate physico-chemical properties. Wettability and cytotoxicity tests were conducted to evaluate the biocompatibility. Microscopic images revealed the presence of macro-, meso-, and micropores in the polymer structure with HA/βTCP particles homogeneously dispersed. Chemical and thermal analyses presented similar results for both PLGA+HA/βTCP and PLGA+HA/βTCP+SIM. The incorporation of simvastatin improved the hydrophilicity of scaffolds. Additionally, PLGA+HA/βTCP and PLGA+HA/βTCP+SIM scaffolds were biocompatible for osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells. In summary, PLGA+HA/βTCP scaffolds incorporating simvastatin presented adequate structural, chemical, thermal, and biological properties for bone tissue engineering.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1563/aaid-joi-D-19-00148DOI Listing
April 2021

Development and physicochemical characterization of saquinavir mesylate solid dispersions using Gelucire 44/14 or PEG 4000 as carrier.

Arch Pharm Res 2013 Sep 23;36(9):1113-25. Epub 2013 May 23.

Laboratório de Virologia Aplicada, Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, Trindade, Florianópolis, SC, 88040-900, Brazil.

Solid dispersions of saquinavir mesylate containing either Gelucire® 44/14 or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) 4000, or mixtures of each carrier with Tween 80 or polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) K30 were prepared in order to enhance the drug dissolution rate. These systems were prepared by the melting method and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, microscopical techniques, and Raman spectroscopy aiming to establish a relationship between physicochemical and dissolution properties under different cooling conditions. Modifications in degree of crystalline order/disorder over time were observed in preparations with both carriers. Overall, formulations cooled and stored at -20 °C showed less variation in dissolution rates than those at 25 °C. Although Tween 80 has enhanced the known self-emulsifying properties of Gelucire® 44/14, its combination with PEG 4000 displayed miscibility problems. The addition of PVP K30 was not the most effective approach in enhancing the dissolution in early steps; however, the drug dissolution was stable after 7 days of storage at 25 °C. The combination of PEG 4000 and PVP K30 maintained the dissolution properties for 60 and 90 days at 25 °C/95% relative humidity and 40 °C/75% (f₂ values >50), respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12272-013-0142-2DOI Listing
September 2013

Evaluation of the stress distribution in CFR-PEEK dental implants by the three-dimensional finite element method.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2010 Jul 13;21(7):2079-85. Epub 2010 May 13.

Department of Pos-Graduation Course of Implantology, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil.

CFR-PEEK (carbon fiber reforced-poly ether ether ketone) has been demonstrated to be excellent substitute titanium in orthopedic applications and can be manufactured with many physical, mechanical, and surface properties, in several shapes. The aim of this study was to compare, using the three-dimensional finite element method, the stress distribution in the peri-implant support bone of distinct models composed of PEEK components and implants reinforced with 30% carbon fiber (30% CFR-PEEK) or titanium. In simulations with a perfect bonding between the bone and the implant, the 30% CFR-PEEK presented higher stress concentration in the implant neck and the adjacent bone, due to the decreased stiffness and higher deformation in relation to the titanium. However, 30% CFR-PEEK implants and components did not exhibit any advantages in relation to the stress distribution compared to the titanium implants and components.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-010-4084-7DOI Listing
July 2010

Evaluation of physical-chemical properties and biocompatibility of a microrough and smooth bioactive glass particles.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2008 Aug 6;19(8):2809-17. Epub 2008 Mar 6.

Department of Dentistry, State University of Ponta Grossa, CEP-84030-900, Uvaranas, Ponta Grossa, PR, Brazil.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate physical-chemical and biocompatibility characteristics of a simple synthesis and low cost experimental bioactive glass. Physical and chemical properties were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive (EDX), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The biomaterials were subcutaneously implanted into rats, according to the following groups: G1, PerioGlastrade mark; G2, Biograntrade mark, G3, Experimental Bioactive Glass U (BGU) and G4, Control (Sham). After 7, 15, 21, 45, and 60 days, 5 animals/group/period were sacrificed and the subcutaneous tissue was dissected for histological and histometric analysis, considering inflammatory reaction and granulation area, presence of polymorphonuclear (PMN), monuclear (MN) and fibroblast (F) cells. SEM analysis of biomaterials showed irregular particles with different surface characteristics. EDX showed calcium, oxygen, sodium, phosphorus and silicon; XRF revealed silica oxide (SiO(2)), sodium oxide (Na(2)O), calcium oxide (CaO) and phosphorus oxide (P(2)O(5)). XRD indicated non crystalline phase. Measurement of tissue reaction showed similar results among the experimental groups at 45 and 60 days. No difference was found for PMN, MN and F cell counts. All biomaterials exhibited partial resorption. In conclusion, the experimental bioactive glass analyzed showed physical and chemical characteristics similar to the commercially available biomaterials, and was considered biocompatible, being partially reabsorbed in the subcutaneous tissue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-008-3407-4DOI Listing
August 2008

Physico-chemical characterization and biocompatibility evaluation of hydroxyapatites.

J Oral Sci 2006 Dec;48(4):219-26

Department of Dentistry, State University of Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the physico-chemical and biocompatibility characteristics of two different hydroxyapatites. Physical and chemical properties were analyzed using granulometric analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy-dispersion (EDX), X-ray fuorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Biomaterials were implanted into the subcutaneous tissue on the dorsum of 36 Wistar rats, divided into the following groups: Group 1 - Gen-Ox (natural); Group 2 - HA-U (synthetic) and Group 3 - Control (Sham). After 15 and 30 days, 6 animals/period were sacrificed and the subcutaneous tissue was taken for histological and histometric analysis, giving consideration to inflammatory reaction and granule area. The granulometric test results showed a mean granule diameter of 161.6 microm (min = 19.0 microm; max = 498.0 microm) and 48.7 microm (min = 7.0 microm; max = 256.0 microm) for groups 1 and 2 respectively. Analysis with SEM demonstrated irregular and sharp-edge particles in group 1 (3332.8 +/- 274.3 microm(2)) and irregular and rounded particles in group 2 (1320.8 +/- 83.0 microm(2)) (P < 0.0001; Student's t test). EDX and XRF revealed calcium, carbon, oxygen, sodium and phosphorus in both groups. XRD indicated that both biomaterials were pure and crystalline. There was a statistically significant difference in granule area between the two groups after 15 days (P = 0.022; Student's t-test). After 15 days, an increased inflammatory response was seen in group 2 (P < 0.0001; ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test) whereas it was more pronounced in group 1 after 30 days (P < 0.0001; ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test). It was concluded that these biomaterials have similar physical, chemical and biocompatibility characteristics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2334/josnusd.48.219DOI Listing
December 2006