Publications by authors named "Ardern Hulme-Beaman"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The origins of the domesticate brown rat () and its pathways to domestication.

Anim Front 2021 May 19;11(3):78-86. Epub 2021 Jun 19.

Archaeozoology, Archaeobotany, Societies, Practices, Environments (AASPE-UMR7209), CNRS, National Museum of Natural History (MNHN), Paris, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/af/vfab020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8214441PMC
May 2021

Dire wolves were the last of an ancient New World canid lineage.

Nature 2021 03 13;591(7848):87-91. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Center for Evolution and Medicine, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.

Dire wolves are considered to be one of the most common and widespread large carnivores in Pleistocene America, yet relatively little is known about their evolution or extinction. Here, to reconstruct the evolutionary history of dire wolves, we sequenced five genomes from sub-fossil remains dating from 13,000 to more than 50,000 years ago. Our results indicate that although they were similar morphologically to the extant grey wolf, dire wolves were a highly divergent lineage that split from living canids around 5.7 million years ago. In contrast to numerous examples of hybridization across Canidae, there is no evidence for gene flow between dire wolves and either North American grey wolves or coyotes. This suggests that dire wolves evolved in isolation from the Pleistocene ancestors of these species. Our results also support an early New World origin of dire wolves, while the ancestors of grey wolves, coyotes and dholes evolved in Eurasia and colonized North America only relatively recently.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-03082-xDOI Listing
March 2021

Specialized sledge dogs accompanied Inuit dispersal across the North American Arctic.

Proc Biol Sci 2019 12 27;286(1916):20191929. Epub 2019 Nov 27.

Holmenkollen Ski Museum, Oslo, Norway.

Domestic dogs have been central to life in the North American Arctic for millennia. The ancestors of the Inuit were the first to introduce the widespread usage of dog sledge transportation technology to the Americas, but whether the Inuit adopted local Palaeo-Inuit dogs or introduced a new dog population to the region remains unknown. To test these hypotheses, we generated mitochondrial DNA and geometric morphometric data of skull and dental elements from a total of 922 North American Arctic dogs and wolves spanning over 4500 years. Our analyses revealed that dogs from Inuit sites dating from 2000 BP possess morphological and genetic signatures that distinguish them from earlier Palaeo-Inuit dogs, and identified a novel mitochondrial clade in eastern Siberia and Alaska. The genetic legacy of these Inuit dogs survives today in modern Arctic sledge dogs despite phenotypic differences between archaeological and modern Arctic dogs. Together, our data reveal that Inuit dogs derive from a secondary pre-contact migration of dogs distinct from Palaeo-Inuit dogs, and probably aided the Inuit expansion across the North American Arctic beginning around 1000 BP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.1929DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6939252PMC
December 2019

Exploring (Rodentia, Muridae) as a possible species complex using geometric morphometrics on dental morphology.

Mamm Biol 2018 Sep;92:62-67

Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, University of Liverpool, 12-14 Abercromby Square, Liverpool L69 7WZ, UK.

Taxonomic uncertainties in the genus persist due to among-species morphological conservatism coupled with within-species environmental variation in morphology. As a result, this genus contains a number of possible cryptic species. One important example can be found in , where morphological studies indicate it is a possible species complex. Genetic studies of (limited to analysis of mitochondrial DNA) have been inconclusive, but do indicate such subdivision. Here we use geometric morphometrics to explore this possible species complex by analysing the dental traits of 48 specimens from New Guinea and neighbouring regions. We find separate molar morphologies for Bougainsville Island, central New Guinea and west New Guinea which cannot be easily explained by different environmental factors (climate, precipitation and altitude), strongly suggesting the existence of a number of evolutionarily distinct taxa within what is currently called thus supporting previous suggestions that is a species complex. Our findings demonstrate the potential of advanced morphological analyses in identifying separate species, contrary to the claims of morphological conservatism. Future analyses should combine geometric morphometrics with genetic analyses over the species range and include sub-fossil specimens from the Bismarck archipelago and Solomon Islands to resolve the evolutionary history of .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mambio.2018.04.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6067089PMC
September 2018

The evolutionary history of dogs in the Americas.

Science 2018 Jul;361(6397):81-85

Department of Archaeology, BioArCh, University of York, York, UK.

Dogs were present in the Americas before the arrival of European colonists, but the origin and fate of these precontact dogs are largely unknown. We sequenced 71 mitochondrial and 7 nuclear genomes from ancient North American and Siberian dogs from time frames spanning ~9000 years. Our analysis indicates that American dogs were not derived from North American wolves. Instead, American dogs form a monophyletic lineage that likely originated in Siberia and dispersed into the Americas alongside people. After the arrival of Europeans, native American dogs almost completely disappeared, leaving a minimal genetic legacy in modern dog populations. The closest detectable extant lineage to precontact American dogs is the canine transmissible venereal tumor, a contagious cancer clone derived from an individual dog that lived up to 8000 years ago.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aao4776DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7116273PMC
July 2018

Synchronous diversification of Sulawesi's iconic artiodactyls driven by recent geological events.

Proc Biol Sci 2018 04;285(1876)

No affiliation.

The high degree of endemism on Sulawesi has previously been suggested to have vicariant origins, dating back to 40 Ma. Recent studies, however, suggest that much of Sulawesi's fauna assembled over the last 15 Myr. Here, we test the hypothesis that more recent uplift of previously submerged portions of land on Sulawesi promoted diversification and that much of its faunal assemblage is much younger than the island itself. To do so, we combined palaeogeographical reconstructions with genetic and morphometric datasets derived from Sulawesi's three largest mammals: the babirusa, anoa and Sulawesi warty pig. Our results indicate that although these species most likely colonized the area that is now Sulawesi at different times (14 Ma to 2-3 Ma), they experienced an almost synchronous expansion from the central part of the island. Geological reconstructions indicate that this area was above sea level for most of the last 4 Myr, unlike most parts of the island. We conclude that emergence of land on Sulawesi (approx. 1-2 Myr) may have allowed species to expand synchronously. Altogether, our results indicate that the establishment of the highly endemic faunal assemblage on Sulawesi was driven by geological events over the last few million years.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2017.2566DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5904307PMC
April 2018

Sperm competition as an under-appreciated factor in domestication.

Biol Lett 2018 03;14(3)

Mammalian Behaviour & Evolution Group, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, Liverpool CH64 7TE, UK.

Humans created an environment that increased selective pressures on subgroups of those species that became domestic. We propose that the domestication process may in some cases have been facilitated by changes in mating behaviour and resultant sperm competition. By adapting to sperm competition, proto-domestic animals could potentially have outcompeted their wild counterparts in human-constructed niches. This could have contributed to the restriction of gene flow between the proto-domesticates and their wild counterparts, thereby promoting the fixation of other domestication characteristics. Further to this novel perspective for domestication, we emphasize the general potential of postcopulatory sexual selection in the restriction of gene flow between populations, and urge more studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2018.0043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5897616PMC
March 2018

Reconstructing Asian faunal introductions to eastern Africa from multi-proxy biomolecular and archaeological datasets.

PLoS One 2017 17;12(8):e0182565. Epub 2017 Aug 17.

Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany.

Human-mediated biological exchange has had global social and ecological impacts. In sub-Saharan Africa, several domestic and commensal animals were introduced from Asia in the pre-modern period; however, the timing and nature of these introductions remain contentious. One model supports introduction to the eastern African coast after the mid-first millennium CE, while another posits introduction dating back to 3000 BCE. These distinct scenarios have implications for understanding the emergence of long-distance maritime connectivity, and the ecological and economic impacts of introduced species. Resolution of this longstanding debate requires new efforts, given the lack of well-dated fauna from high-precision excavations, and ambiguous osteomorphological identifications. We analysed faunal remains from 22 eastern African sites spanning a wide geographic and chronological range, and applied biomolecular techniques to confirm identifications of two Asian taxa: domestic chicken (Gallus gallus) and black rat (Rattus rattus). Our approach included ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis aided by BLAST-based bioinformatics, Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry (ZooMS) collagen fingerprinting, and direct AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) radiocarbon dating. Our results support a late, mid-first millennium CE introduction of these species. We discuss the implications of our findings for models of biological exchange, and emphasize the applicability of our approach to tropical areas with poor bone preservation.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0182565PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5560628PMC
October 2017

An Ecological and Evolutionary Framework for Commensalism in Anthropogenic Environments.

Trends Ecol Evol 2016 08 10;31(8):633-645. Epub 2016 Jun 10.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Corson Hall, Ithaca, NY14853-2701, USA.

Commensalism within anthropogenic environments has not been extensively discussed, despite its impact on humans, and there is no formal framework for assessing this ecological relationship in its varied forms. Here, we examine commensalism in anthropogenic environments in detail, considering both ecological and evolutionary drivers. The many assumptions about commensalism and the nature of anthropogenic environments are discussed and we highlight dependency as a key attribute of anthropogenic commensals (anthrodependent taxa). We primarily focus on mammalian species in the anthropogenic-commensal niche, but the traits described and selective pressures presented are likely fundamental to many species engaged in intense commensal relationships with humans. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this largely understudied interaction represents an important opportunity to investigate evolutionary processes in rapidly changing environments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2016.05.001DOI Listing
August 2016