Publications by authors named "Aradhana Gupta"

20 Publications

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Safety evaluation of a novel topical combination of esafoxolaner, eprinomectin and praziquantel, in reproducing female cats.

Parasite 2021 2;28:20. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, 3239 Satellite Blvd, Duluth, 30096 GA, USA.

NexGard Combo, a novel topical endectoparasiticide product for cats, is a combination of esafoxolaner, eprinomectin and praziquantel. The safety of this novel combination administered to females during reproduction and lactation was evaluated per analysis of breeding parameters and adverse reactions observed on females and offspring. Females with successful breeding history were randomized to three groups, a placebo group and groups treated with the novel formulation at 1× or 3× multiples of the maximum exposure dose. Females were dosed at 28-day intervals, at least twice before mating, then during a period including mating, pregnancy, whelping and 56 days of lactation. In the placebo, 1× and 3× groups, 10, 9 and 10 females, respectively completed the study (nine, seven and nine females achieved pregnancy), and were dosed 7.1 times on average. Breeding parameters included success of mating, success of gestation, length of gestation, abortion rate, number of live, dead and stillborn kittens at birth, number of kittens with abnormalities, weight of kittens after birth and at weaning, growth of kittens, proportion of male and female kittens, and proportion of kittens born alive and weaned. No significant adverse reactions related to the novel combination were observed on females and on kittens; no significant and adverse effects on breeding parameters were observed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/parasite/2021016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8019565PMC
April 2021

Target animal safety evaluation of a novel topical combination of esafoxolaner, eprinomectin and praziquantel for cats.

Parasite 2021 2;28:18. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

Boehringer-Ingelheim Animal Health, 29 Avenue Tony Garnier, 69007 Lyon, France.

The safety profile of NexGard Combo, a novel topical product for cats combining esafoxolaner, eprinomectin and praziquantel, for the treatment and prevention of internal and external parasites, was evaluated in kittens, in two margin-of-safety studies (Studies #1 and #2), and in an oral tolerance study (Study #3). In the margin of safety studies, kittens were dosed several times topically with multiples of the maximum exposure dose (1×): in Study #1, 3× and 5× doses four times at 2-week intervals; in Study #2, 1×, 3× and 5× doses six times at 4-week intervals. In Study #3, kittens were dosed orally once with a 1× dose. Furthermore, in Study #1, another group of kittens was dosed topically twice at a 4-week interval with a formulation of esafoxolaner as the sole active ingredient dosed at 23×. Physical examinations and clinical pathology analyses were performed throughout the studies, followed by necropsy and detailed histopathological evaluation in Studies #1 and #2. No significant treatment related effects were observed in the three studies, except for one occurrence of reversible neurological signs attributed to eprinomectin in one cat after the third 5× dose in Study #2, with clinical signs observed nine hours after dosing, pronounced for a few hours, significantly improved the next day, and absent 2 days after dosing. In conclusion, NexGard Combo was demonstrated safe in kittens following repeated topical administrations and following oral ingestion, and very high topical doses of esafoxolaner were well tolerated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/parasite/2021015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8019570PMC
April 2021

Bordetella bronchiseptica experimental model development in pigs and efficacy evaluation of a single intramuscular injection of gamithromycin (Zactran® for Swine) against Bordetella bronchiseptica-associated respiratory disease in experimentally infected piglets.

J Vet Pharmacol Ther 2020 Mar 24;43(2):197-207. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

Merial SAS, Lyon, France.

In the Bordetella bronchiseptica infection model development study, twenty-eight piglets were inoculated with B. bronchiseptica strain of either canine (10  CFU/ml) or swine (10 and 10  CFU/ml) origin; swine origin strain at 10  CFU/ml was chosen for the efficacy assessment study due to higher incidence and severity of gross and histopathological lesions compared with other strains. To assess efficacy of gamithromycin against B. bronchiseptica, forty piglets were experimentally inoculated on Day 0 and clinical signs were scored as per severity. Animals were then treated either with gamithromycin or saline on Day 3. The Global Clinical Scores in gamithromycin-treated group were consistently lower than the saline-treated control group from Day 4 onwards and were 0 and 40 in the gamithromycin-treated and saline-treated control groups, respectively, on Day 6. Severity and frequency of gross and histopathological observations were significantly lower in gamithromycin-treated animals compared with saline-treated controls. The efficacy of Zactran® for Swine at the label dose for the treatment of B. bronchiseptica-associated respiratory disease was demonstrated based on the faster reduction in clinical signs as early as 1 day post-gamithromycin treatment and based on the significant difference in the severity of macroscopic and microscopic lung lesions 10 days post-gamithromycin treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvp.12834DOI Listing
March 2020

Recommendations for Clinical Pathology Data Generation, Interpretation, and Reporting in Target Animal Safety Studies for Veterinary Drug Development.

Int J Toxicol 2017 Jul/Aug;36(4):293-302. Epub 2017 Jun 6.

5 Independent Consultant in Toxicologic Clinical Pathology, Winterthur, Switzerland.

Clinical pathology testing is routinely performed in target animal safety studies in order to identify potential toxicity associated with administration of an investigational veterinary pharmaceutical product. Regulatory and other testing guidelines that address such studies provide recommendations for clinical pathology testing but occasionally contain outdated analytes and do not take into account interspecies physiologic differences that affect the practical selection of appropriate clinical pathology tests. Additionally, strong emphasis is often placed on statistical analysis and use of reference intervals for interpretation of test article-related clinical pathology changes, with limited attention given to the critical scientific review of clinically, toxicologically, or biologically relevant changes. The purpose of this communication from the Regulatory Affairs Committee of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology is to provide current recommendations for clinical pathology testing and data interpretation in target animal safety studies and thereby enhance the value of clinical pathology testing in these studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1091581817711876DOI Listing
April 2018

A rare case of occult abdominal tuberculosis with Poncet's disease mimicking Adult onset Still's disease.

J Midlife Health 2015 Jul-Sep;6(3):125-8

Department of Neurology, Dr. Sampurnanand Medical College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India.

A 50-year-old female presented with fever, symmetrical arthralgias, rash, painful oral ulcerations and alopecia since 8 weeks. Examination showed mild hepatospleenomegaly. Investigations revealed leucocytosis, neutrophilia, elevated sedimentation rate and raised ferritin levels (3850 ng/ml). Computerized tomography (CT) abdomen showed hepatospleenomegaly, mild ascitis and mild bilateral pleural-effusion. After ruling out occult infections, tuberculosis, malignancies and autoimmune diseases by appropriate investigations, and due to raised ferritin levels, adult onset stills disease (AOSD) was diagnosed. Patient responded to oral steroids initially, but after 7 days developed severe abdominal pain. Repeat CT showed multiple enlarged, necrotic and matted retroperitoneal lymph nodes with caseating granuloma on histopathology suggesting tuberculosis. Patient was given four-drug anti-tubercular treatment and she improved. Thus our patient of occult abdominal tuberculosis with reactive arthritis (Poncet's disease) presented with hyperferritinemia mimicking AOSD. We postulate that extreme hyperferritinemia can be seen in tuberculosis and tuberculosis must be conclusively ruled out before diagnosing AOSD in tropics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0976-7800.165593DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4604672PMC
November 2015

Negative interference of icteric serum on a bichromatic biuret total protein assay.

Vet Clin Pathol 2014 Sep 27;43(3):422-7. Epub 2014 Jun 27.

Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.

Background: Bilirubin is stated to be a negative interferent in some biuret assays and thus could contribute to pseudohypoproteinemia in icteric samples.

Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the magnitude of and reason for a falsely low total protein concentration in icteric serum when the protein concentration is measured with a bichromatic spectrophotometric biuret assay.

Methods: Commercially available bilirubin was dissolved in 0.1 M NaOH and mixed with sera from 2 dogs to achieve various bilirubin concentrations of up to 40 mg/dL (first set of samples) and 35 mg/dL (second set of samples, for confirmation of first set of results and to explore the interference). Biuret total protein and bilirubin concentrations were determined with a chemistry analyzer (Cobas 6000 with c501 module). Line graphs were drawn to illustrate the effects of increasing bilirubin concentrations on the total protein concentrations. Specific spectrophotometric absorbance readings were examined to identify the reason for the negative interference.

Results: High bilirubin concentrations created a negative interference in the Cobas biuret assay. The detectable interference occurred with a spiked bilirubin concentration of 10.7 mg/dL in one set of samples, 20.8 mg/dL in a second set. The interference was due to a greater secondary-absorbance reading at the second measuring point in the samples spiked with bilirubin, which possibly had converted to biliverdin.

Conclusion: Marked hyperbilirubinemia is associated with a falsely low serum total protein concentration when measured with a bichromatic spectrophotometric biuret assay. This can result in pseudohypoproteinemia and pseudohypoglobulinemia in icteric serum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vcp.12154DOI Listing
September 2014

Pathology in practice. Cutaneous extramedullary solitary digital plasmacytoma in a dog.

J Am Vet Med Assoc 2014 Jan;244(2):163-5

Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/javma.244.2.163DOI Listing
January 2014

Refractometric total protein concentrations in icteric serum from dogs.

J Am Vet Med Assoc 2014 Jan;244(1):63-7

Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

Objective: To determine whether high serum bilirubin concentrations interfere with the measurement of serum total protein concentration by refractometry and to assess potential biases among refractometer measurements.

Design: Evaluation study.

Sample: Sera from 2 healthy Greyhounds.

Procedures: Bilirubin was dissolved in 0.1M NaOH, and the resulting solution was mixed with sera from 2 dogs from which food had been withheld to achieve various bilirubin concentrations up to 40 mg/dL. Refractometric total protein concentrations were estimated with 3 clinical refractometers. A biochemical analyzer was used to measure biuret assay-based total protein and bilirubin concentrations with spectrophotometric assays.

Results: No interference with refractometric measurement of total protein concentrations was detected with bilirubin concentrations up to 41.5 mg/dL. Biases in refractometric total protein concentrations were detected and were related to the conversion of refractive index values to total protein concentrations.

Conclusions And Clinical Relevance: Hyperbilirubinemia did not interfere with the refractometric estimation of serum total protein concentration. The agreement among total protein concentrations estimated by 3 refractometers was dependent on the method of conversion of refractive index to total protein concentration and was independent of hyperbilirubinemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/javma.244.1.63DOI Listing
January 2014

What is your diagnosis? Abdominal fluid from a dog.

Vet Clin Pathol 2013 Mar 19;42(1):113-4. Epub 2012 Oct 19.

Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-165X.2012.00479.xDOI Listing
March 2013

Flames, rings, veils, and eggs... the many faces of cytoplasm.

Vet Clin Pathol 2012 Jun;41(2):174

Louisiana State University, LA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-165X.2012.00444.xDOI Listing
June 2012

Pathology in practice. Severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia, enteritis, and lymphadenitis with numerous acid-fast bacteria (M xenopi).

J Am Vet Med Assoc 2012 Jun;240(12):1427-9

Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/javma.240.12.1427DOI Listing
June 2012

What is your diagnosis? Chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

J Avian Med Surg 2012 Mar;26(1):45-8

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Louisiana State University, School of Veterinary Medicine, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1647/2011-034.1DOI Listing
March 2012

What is your diagnosis? Fine-needle aspirate of a third eyelid mass in a Paint horse.

Vet Clin Pathol 2012 Jun 6;41(2):299-300. Epub 2012 Apr 6.

Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Skip Bertman Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-165X.2012.00420.xDOI Listing
June 2012

Cloud Watching in Clinical Pathology.

Vet Clin Pathol 2011 Dec;40(4):407-408

Louisiana State University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-165X.2011.00581.xDOI Listing
December 2011

What is your diagnosis? Fine-needle aspirate of ulcerative skin lesions in a dog.

Vet Clin Pathol 2011 Sep 17;40(3):401-2. Epub 2011 Aug 17.

Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-165X.2011.00340.xDOI Listing
September 2011

Guessing game: 1x cytologic 'diagnoses'.

Vet Clin Pathol 2011 Mar;40(1)

Louisiana State University, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-165X.2011.00300.xDOI Listing
March 2011

What is your diagnosis? Cerebrospinal fluid from a dog. Eosinophilic pleocytosis due to protothecosis.

Vet Clin Pathol 2011 Mar 3;40(1):105-6. Epub 2011 Feb 3.

Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-165X.2011.00292.xDOI Listing
March 2011

Malignant B-cell lymphoma with Mott cell differentiation in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

J Vet Diagn Invest 2010 May;22(3):469-73

Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Skip Bertman Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.

A 3.5-year-old, male, neutered ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was presented with a 3-day history of lethargy and anorexia. Splenic aspirates revealed high numbers of intermediate-sized lymphocytes and Mott cells interpreted as lymphoma with Mott cells. The ferret was euthanized because of a poor clinical prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed markedly enlarged spleen and lymph nodes, with multifocal white nodules in the liver parenchyma. Histologically, the spleen had multifocal large nodules composed of neoplastic lymphocytes with frequent Mott cells. Similar neoplastic cells were present in the sections of liver, lymph nodes, and bone marrow. These cells were cluster of differentiation (CD)3-negative, CD79alpha-positive, and lambda light-chain-positive. Electron microscopy revealed that the cytoplasm of the neoplastic Mott cells had increased, disorganized, dilated, rough endoplasmic reticulum containing electron-dense immunoglobulin. On the basis of cytologic, histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic findings, a malignant B-cell lymphoma with Mott cell differentiation was diagnosed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/104063871002200326DOI Listing
May 2010

Caroli's disease.

Indian J Pediatr 2006 Mar;73(3):233-5

Department of Pediatrics, NSCB Medical College, Jabalpur, India.

Caroli's disease is a rare congenital disorder and occasional cases have been reported from Japan and other parts of Asia. It comprises of congenital dilation of the lower (segmental) intrahepatic bile duct. Cholangitis liver, cirrhosis and cholangiocarcinoma are its potential complication. A case of caroli's disease in an 8-years-old boy with bilobar involvement of liver, (specially affecting right superior lobe) presenting with intermittent abdominal pain, fever and hepatosplenomegaly is reported here.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02825490DOI Listing
March 2006