Publications by authors named "Anya Levinson"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Concurrent Subcutaneous Panniculitis-like T-Cell Lymphoma and B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in 2 Pediatric Patients.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2020 Aug 26. Epub 2020 Aug 26.

*Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital Departments of ‡Dermatology §Pathology ∥Laboratory Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Departments of †Pediatrics #Pathology **Dermatology ††Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN ¶Department of Pathology, Sanford Health Pathology Clinic, Sioux Falls, SD.

Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma is a cutaneous lymphoma characterized by CD8 T-cell infiltrate in the subcutis that is rare in children. Acute lymphoblastic lymphoma is the most common pediatric malignancy and often presents with fevers and pancytopenia. Herein, we report 2 pediatric patients presenting with subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma and B-cell acute lymphoblastic lymphoma, distinct hematologic malignancies arising from different lymphoid lineages, with no identifiable germline cancer predisposition.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPH.0000000000001921DOI Listing
August 2020

A Multicenter Study of Bacterial Blood Stream Infections in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipients: The Role of Acute Gastrointestinal Graft-versus-Host Disease.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2017 Apr 16;23(4):642-647. Epub 2017 Jan 16.

Department of Pediatrics, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital, San Francisco, California.

Blood stream infections (BSI) caused by enteric organisms are associated with a particularly high mortality rate in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) recipients. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study aiming to analyze the risk factors associated with antibiotic resistance and impact of BSI on transplantation-related mortality (TRM) in children after alloHCT. During the study period from 2004 to 2014, 395 children (mean age, 9.4 years) with at least 1 BSI were included. The incidences of resistant gram-negative rods were 20.7% to piperacillin-tazobactam, 10.9% to cefepime, 21% to ceftazidime, 11.4% to levofloxacin, and 8.16% to meropenem. Thirty-eight percent of Enterococcus spp. isolates were resistant to vancomycin. More than 1 episode of BSI was associated with significant increase in the risk of resistance to piperacillin-tazobactam, cefepime, and vancomycin. On multivariate analysis of risk factors for TRM, achievement of neutrophil engraftment by day 30 was associated with lower TRM (P = .002). However, infection with an antibiotic-resistant organism was not associated with TRM. Development of enteric bacterial BSI after the onset of acute gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was the strongest predictor of TRM (hazard ratio, 4.786; 95% confidence interval, 2.833 to 8.087; P < .001). In patients with acute gastrointestinal GVHD who subsequently developed enteric bacterial BSI, the incidence of 1-year TRM was 33.4% (SE = 7%), compared with 15.3% (SE = 2%) for those without acute gastrointestinal GVHD (P = .004). Primary prevention of a first episode of BSI is arguably the most important intervention to decrease antibiotic resistance. It is also imperative that we develop strategies to maintain gastrointestinal health, especially in patients with gastrointestinal GVHD, in an effort to prevent subsequent enteric bacterial BSI and improve survival.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.01.073DOI Listing
April 2017

Timing and Utility of Relapse Surveillance after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children with Leukemia.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2017 Apr 4;23(4):696-700. Epub 2017 Jan 4.

Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University, New York, New York. Electronic address:

The utility and optimal timing of routine bone marrow (BM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surveillance after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) in children with leukemia have not been previously studied. To examine the current practice concerning relapse surveillance in this population, we conducted a national survey of pediatric bone marrow transplant physicians. Sixty-two of 152 potential participants (41%) completed the survey. For acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, 41 physicians (66%) reported performing routine BM analysis in all such patients, 15 (24%) in some patients and 6 (10%) in no patients. Data were similar for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Among those who do such screening in the ALL population, 11 physicians (24%) reported performing 1 BM analysis in the first year, 11 (24%) performed 2, 6 (13%) performed 3, 12 (27%) performed 4, and 5 (12%) performed 5 to 10. Data were similar for AML. The most common time point for screening in both diseases was day 100, followed closely by day 365. With respect to central nervous system (CNS) screening in ALL, 11 physicians (18%) screened all patients, 28 (45%) screened no patients, and 23 (37%) screened only patients with prior CNS disease. Use of intrathecal chemotherapy in these patients also varied, with 7 (12%) doing so in all patients, 17 (29%) only in previously CNS-positive patients, and 35 (59%) in no patients. To assess the utility of surveillance procedures, we performed a retrospective review of 108 childhood leukemia patients after alloHCT at our center. Forty-one relapses (38%) occurred with a median time to relapse of 171 days. Five (12%) occurred after day 365. Of the 36 relapses within the first year, 20 (56%) were identified by clinical suspicion, whereas 16 (44%) were identified by routine screening procedures. The percentages of patients in whom routine screening detected relapse at days 100, 180, 270, and 365, respectively, was 6.7%, 11.1%, 11.9%, and 0%. That is, by day 365, no patient (of 38) who had routine BM surveillance had evidence of relapse on analysis of the BM. Our survey confirms a lack of standardization regarding routine BM and CSF relapse surveillance after alloHCT in children with leukemia. We have demonstrated that while day 365 post-alloHCT is a very commonly utilized time point for routine screening, the yield of such screening at this time is very low, such that the performance of these procedures may not be justified at that time. Prospective collaboration among pediatric alloHCT centers may help to provide more robust evidence-based guidelines designed to maximize utility and minimize risk.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.01.004DOI Listing
April 2017

Bacterial bloodstream infections in pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell recipients before and after implementation of a central line-associated bloodstream infection protocol: A single-center experience.

Am J Infect Control 2016 12 1;44(12):1650-1655. Epub 2016 Jul 1.

Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University, New York, NY. Electronic address:

Introduction: There are only few reports describing the influence of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) prevention strategies on the incidence of bacterial bloodstream infections (BBSIs).

Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study among pediatric recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) to assess potential changes in BBSI rates during 3 time periods: pre-CLABSI prevention era (era 1, 2004-2005), CLABSI prevention implementation era (era 2, 2006-2009), and maintenance of CLABSI prevention era (era 3, 2010-2012). BBSI from day 0-365 following allo-HCT were studied. The comparison of person-years incidence rates among different periods was carried out by Poisson regression analysis.

Results: The mean age of patients was 10.0 years. During the study period, 126 (65%) of 190 patients had at least a single BBSI. From day 0-30, day 31-100, day 101-180, and day 181-365, 20%, 28%, 30%, and 17% of patients, respectively, experienced BBSIs. The rate of Staphylococcus epidermidis and gram-negative pathogens significantly declined from 3.16-0.93 and 6.32-2.21 per 100 person-months during era 1 and era 3, respectively (P = .001).

Conclusions: Patients undergoing allo-HCT during era 3 were associated with decreased risk of BBSI (P = .012). Maintenance of CLABSI protocols by nursing staff and appropriate education of other care providers is essential to lower incidence of BBSI in this high-risk population, and further strategies to decrease infection burden should be studied.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2016.04.229DOI Listing
December 2016

Survival Impact of Early Post-Transplant Toxicities in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Malignant and Nonmalignant Diseases: Recognizing Risks and Optimizing Outcomes.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2016 08 17;22(8):1525-1530. Epub 2016 May 17.

Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. Electronic address:

In pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, treatment-related toxicities remain a clinical challenge. A paucity of data investigates the risks for and survival impact of treatment-related toxicities in this population. Here the authors assess the relative toxicity of myeloablative, reduced-toxicity, and reduced-intensity conditioning regimens; identify patient-related predictors of post-transplant toxicities; and investigate the impact of early post-transplant toxicities on transplant-related mortality (TRM). In this retrospective study, 164 patients (aged 1 to 22 years) underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation after busulfan-based conditioning for malignant and nonmalignant diseases between 2000 and 2014. The number of grades III to IV toxicities between days 0 and +30 was calculated for each patient. TRM was calculated to 2 years. Median patient age was 9 years, and median number of toxicities was 3 (range, 0 to 17). The 100-person day incidence of post-transplant toxicities in myeloablative conditioning was not different from the incidence in reduced-toxicity conditioning (13.88 versus 13.59, P = .812). Reduced intensity was less toxic than both myeloablative and reduced toxicity (13.75 versus 8.41, P < .001). Age ≥ 12 years (.276 with SE = .138, P = .045) and unrelated donor transplant (.318 with SE = 0.113, P = .005) were risk factors for ≥3 toxicities. Having ≥3 toxicities or a performance score < 90 conferred higher risk of TRM (P = .021). In pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation, reduced-toxicity conditioning was not significantly less toxic than myeloablative conditioning. Additionally, the number of post-transplant toxicities correlated with the risk of mortality. Further investigations to confirm our findings are warranted.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.05.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5496771PMC
August 2016

Acute gastrointestinal graft-vs-host disease is associated with increased enteric bacterial bloodstream infection density in pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

Clin Infect Dis 2015 Aug 5;61(3):350-7. Epub 2015 May 5.

Department of Pediatrics.

Background: Bacterial septicemia remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (AlloHCT). While murine studies have found acute gastrointestinal graft-vs-host disease (aG-GVHD) to be associated with increased incidence of enteric bacterial bloodstream infections (EB-BSI), this association has not been studied in humans. We hypothesized that in patients who developed aG-GVHD, the EB-BSI density after onset of aG-GVHD would be higher than before onset and higher than in patients without acute GVHD (aGVHD).

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data collected on 264 pediatric AlloHCT recipients with malignant and nonmalignant disease. We calculated and compared EB-BSI densities in the following 3 subgroups: patients without aGVHD and patients with aG-GVHD, both before and after onset of aG-GVHD. We also examined the effect of aG-GVHD onset on the first episode of EB-BSI using Cox proportional hazards models.

Results: The overall incidence of aG-GVHD was 28.8% (n = 76). Analyses done both at 120 and 180 days post-AlloHCT showed that the EB-BSI density increased after aG-GVHD onset (0.95 infections/person-year before aG-GVHD vs 2.7 infections/person-year after aG-GVHD at day 120 [P = .006]; 0.95 infections/person-year before aG-GVHD vs 2.26 infections/person-year after aG-GVHD at day 180 [P = .033]). On multivariate analysis, the onset of aG-GVHD had a positive hazard ratio of 1.47 (P = .077) on time to first EB-BSI.

Conclusions: Our results support the theory that aG-GVHD predisposes pediatric AlloHCT recipients to EB-BSI. Prophylactic agents such as probiotics should be studied prospectively in patients with aG-GVHD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/civ285DOI Listing
August 2015