Publications by authors named "Anupam Das"

261 Publications

SERS-based serodiagnosis of acute febrile diseases using plasmonic nanopopcorn microarray platforms.

Biosens Bioelectron 2021 Jul 21;192:113525. Epub 2021 Jul 21.

Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 06974, South Korea. Electronic address:

We report a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based immunoassay platform for the rapid diagnosis of scrub typhus and murine typhus, which are the most common acute febrile diseases in South Korea. A microarray device, composed of multiple gold nanopopcorn substrates capable of detecting ultra-sensitive biomarkers, was used as a multiplex SERS-based assay platform. Sequentially diluted titers of Orientia tsutsugamushi and Rickettsia typhi specific human IgG/IgM antibodies, which are biomarkers of two typhus diseases, were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, and the peak intensity was plotted against the different titer concentration range (0-2048 and 0-1024 for O. tsutsugamushi IgG/IgM and 0-8192 and 0-256 for R. typhi IgG/IgM) to generate calibration curves. The sensitivities and limits of detection (LODs) determined for four different IgG/IgM antibodies were significantly lower than those for the ELISA method. The LODs of titer concentrations for O. tsutsugamushi IgG/IgM and R. typhi IgG/IgM are determined to be 20.4, 7.03, 16.8 and 12.5, respectively. The LOD values were all lower than the cut-off values (256, 16, 128, and 64) used for clinical diagnosis, which means that this assay platform can diagnose two typhus diseases with high sensitivity. When the microarray sensors are combined with portable Raman spectrophotometers, which are commercially available worldwide, it is also possible to directly diagnose a patient in the field without sending their blood sample to a hospital.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2021.113525DOI Listing
July 2021

Reversing the Trend of Antimicrobial Resistance in ICU: Role of Antimicrobial and Diagnostic Stewardship.

Indian J Crit Care Med 2021 Jun;25(6):635-641

Department of Microbiology, Dr Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Background: Increasing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among common bacteria combined with the slow development of new antibiotics has posed a challenge to clinicians.

Aim And Objective: To demonstrate whether antimicrobial and diagnostic stewardship program (ASP and DSP)-related interventions improve antibiotic susceptibilities among common bacteria causing bloodstream infections (BSI) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and whether these resulted in changes in the volume of antimicrobial consumption.

Materials And Methods: We compared the susceptibility patterns of gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and gram-positive cocci (GPC) causing BSI and changes in the volume of antibiotics prescribed for the same before and after 2017 by a retrospective analysis.

Results: Postintervention, there was increased susceptibility of all GNBs to aminoglycosides; and spp. to beta-lactambeta-lactamase inhibitors (BLBLI) combinations; and spp. and spp. to carbapenems. spp., spp., and spp. showed improved susceptibility to doxycycline, whereas and spp. showed significantly improved susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. Among GPCs, there was increased susceptibility of (levofloxacin, clindamycin, and aminoglycoside), coagulase-negative (CoNS) (chloramphenicol, levofloxacin, clindamycin, and aminoglycoside), and enterococci (chloramphenicol, levofloxacin, and clindamycin). There was a significant reduction in usage of antimicrobials for the treatment of GPCs (linezolid, doxycycline, chloramphenicol, levofloxacin, BLBLI, macrolide, and cephalosporin) and GNBs (levofloxacin, cephalosporin, carbapenem, and colistin), which caused BSI.

Conclusion: The present study illustrated that combined ASP and DSP interventions successfully reversed the resistance pattern of organisms causing BSI and resulted in a reduction in antibiotic utilization.

How To Cite This Article: Agarwal J, Singh V, Das A, Nath SS, Kumar R, Sen M. Reversing the Trend of Antimicrobial Resistance in ICU: Role of Antimicrobial and Diagnostic Stewardship. Indian J Crit Care Med 2021;25(6):635-641.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5005/jp-journals-10071-23861DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8286411PMC
June 2021

Prevalence and characteristics of dermatological manifestations in COVID-19 positive dermatologists: Report from a web-based survey in India.

J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2021 Jul 23. Epub 2021 Jul 23.

Department of Dermatology, Saheed Hasan Khan Mewati Government Medical College and Hospital, Nuh, India.

The available literature on dermatological manifestations of COVID-19 indicates a variation in prevalence and characteristics of muco-cutaneous findings among different population groups. An early descriptive Chinese study reported a prevalence of 0.2%, however, a recent Spanish study reported a prevalence of 45.7%..
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jdv.17532DOI Listing
July 2021

Recurrent COVID-19 infection in a health care worker: a case report.

J Med Case Rep 2021 Jul 12;15(1):363. Epub 2021 Jul 12.

Department of Microbiology, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, 226010, India.

Background: Recurrent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection is an emerging problem and may prove to be one of the greatest problems in controlling the pandemic in the future. Recurrent infections can be due to reactivation of dormant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or reinfection with similar or different strains of SARS-CoV-2.

Case Presentation: Here we present an interesting case of a health care worker working as a laboratory assistant at a COVID-19 laboratory who developed recurrent COVID-19 infection. He did not develop an immune response after the first episode of COVID-19; however, immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were detected after the second episode.

Conclusions: Through this case, we discuss the concept of reactivation and reinfection in the post-COVID period. We suggest that standard guidelines should be established to check for viral shedding and immune response among cured cases of COVID-19 after discharge via serial real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing and IgG antibody detection. Further, strict hygiene practices should be stressed to these patients with possibility of COVID-19 recurrence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13256-021-02881-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8273561PMC
July 2021

Transient dermatoses: Leaving a lasting memory.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 Jun 24:1-3. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Department of Dermatology, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/IJDVL_1028_20DOI Listing
June 2021

The unprecedented epidemic-like scenario of dermatophytosis in India: III. Antifungal resistance and treatment options.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 [SEASON];87(4):468-482

Department of Dermatology, Bhojani Clinic, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

One of the canonical features of the current outbreak of dermatophytosis in India is its unresponsiveness to treatment in majority of cases. Though there appears to be discordance between in vivo and in vitro resistance, demonstration of in vitro resistance of dermatophytes to antifungals by antifungal susceptibility testing is essential as it may help in appropriate management. The practical problem in the interpretation of antifungal susceptibility testing is the absence of clinical breakpoints and epidemiologic cutoff values. In their absence, evaluation of the upper limit of a minimal inhibitory concentration of wild type isolates may be beneficial for managing dermatophytosis and monitoring the emergence of isolates with reduced susceptibility. In the current scenario, most of the cases are unresponsive to standard dosages and duration of treatment recommended until now. This has resulted in many ex-cathedra modalities of treatment that are being pursued without any evidence. There is an urgent need to carry out methodical research to develop an evidence base to formulate a rational management approach in the current scenario.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/IJDVL_303_20DOI Listing
March 2020

Unilateral Linear Capillaritis.

Indian Dermatol Online J 2021 May-Jun;12(3):486-487. Epub 2020 Sep 28.

Department of Dermatology, KPC Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_649_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8202481PMC
September 2020

An Observational Survey to Appraise the Influence of COVID-19 Pandemic on Dermatology Training Programs in India: Residents' Standpoint.

Indian Dermatol Online J 2021 May-Jun;12(3):423-428. Epub 2021 May 12.

Department of Dermatology, KPC Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Background: Given the all-encompassing foothold of COVID-19, it is plausible that the pandemic would have a long-lasting impact on medical training programs, including dermatology. We conducted a survey amongst the residents of dermatology (across India) to assess the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on their teaching and education programs.

Materials And Methods: An online semi-structured English questionnaire was prepared on the Google-forms platform and the link was circulated among the residents. The questionnaire comprised of five sections (demographic details, impact on clinical training, procedural training, academic curriculum, and research activities). Appropriate statistical tests were carried out to analyze the data obtained.

Results: Three-hundred and seventy-eight responses were taken into consideration. A majority of the respondents (63.5%) were engaged in both COVID-19-related duties and departmental work (out-patient and in-patient duty). Around two-thirds of the trainees (65.1%) claimed a reduction in patient footfall (greater than 50% compared to pre-COVID times). Sixty-nine percent reported a decline of more than 50% in in-patient admission; 47.6% felt that the discontinuity in patient care had severely affected their residency training; 50.8% highlighted that no procedures were being performed in their department; 54.5% opined that academic activities were relatively unhampered as regular seminars were being conducted through online web-based applications; and 65.1% of the trainees were not able to devote any time to their thesis-related work.

Conclusion: Since the after-effects of this pandemic will last long, it is advisable that residents and faculties adapt themselves to web-based learning programs in the academic curriculum so that the training of the future consultants does not get jeopardized. Our survey, being the first of its kind in dermatology, will throw some light on the perspective of residents and the way forward to combat the untoward consequences on their training programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_657_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8202489PMC
May 2021

An Upsurge of Hand Dermatitis Cases Amidst COVID-19 Pandemic.

Indian J Dermatol 2021 Mar-Apr;66(2):218-220

Department of Dermatology, RG Kar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India E-mail:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijd.IJD_631_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8208260PMC
June 2021

Skin Damage Induced by Enhanced Protective Measures in Frontline Doctors During Covid-19 Pandemic: A Web-Based Descriptive Study.

Indian J Dermatol 2021 Mar-Apr;66(2):145-150

Department of Dermatology, KPC Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Background: Frontline doctors engaged in COVID-19 duties have to adopt enhanced protective measures to minimize their risk of exposure. However, these measures may lead to several skin problems, thereby affecting their performance.

Objectives: To analyze skin changes induced by enhanced protective measures and explore possible risk factors.

Materials And Methods: A web-based descriptive study was conducted among 212 frontline COVID-19 doctors. Data were collected regarding their demography, duty, use of enhanced protective measures including prophylactic hydroxychloroquine, recent skin changes with affected sites, and possible risk factors.

Results: Skin changes were reported by 41.5% of respondents (mean age 34.8 ± 5.6 years) across 210 sites. Hands were involved most commonly in 77.3% of doctors, followed by nasal bridge, cheeks, and retroauricular area. Dryness (84.1%) and skin peeling (79.5%) were the commonest clinical features. Regression model showed prolonged PPE wear (>6 h) adjusted odd's ratio (AOR) 2.9, = 0.005], heavy sweating [AOR 12.8, = 0.001] and frequent hand hygiene (>10 times/day) [AOR 3.1, = 0.0006] to be significant risk factors. Hydroxychloroquine prophylaxis was deemed safe as treatment-emergent adverse events were uncommon (17.4%).

Conclusion: Frontline doctors have an increased risk of developing skin damage due to enhanced protective measures. Appropriate steps should be taken to address the risk factors and minimize skin damage. Persistent cases mandate dermatology referral for optimum management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijd.IJD_687_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8208271PMC
June 2021

Comparative Evaluation of the Role of Nonbronchoscopic and Bronchoscopic Techniques of Distal Airway Sampling for the Diagnosis of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia.

Anesth Essays Res 2020 Jul-Sep;14(3):434-440. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Background: The diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) remains a challenge, with clinicians mainly relying on clinical, radiological, and bacteriologic strategies to manage patients with VAP.

Aims: To compare the results of non-bronchoscopic and bronchoscopic techniques of distal airway sampling for the diagnosis of VAP.

Settings And Design: This was a single-center prospective diagnostic accuracy study done in the 14-bedded intensive care unit of a tertiary care referral hospital.

Materials And Methods: Patients aged ≥18 years, on mechanical ventilation for ≥48 h, and with clinical suspicion of VAP (fever, leukocytosis, and increased tracheal secretions) either on admission or during their stay were included. Every patient underwent both procedures for sample collection, first non-bronchoscopic protected bronchoalveolar lavage (NP-BAL) and then bronchoscopic BAL (B-BAL). Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score (CPIS) was calculated for each patient and the collected samples were evaluated in laboratory using standard microbiological techniques.

Statistical Analysis Used: The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of NP-BAL and B-BAL for the diagnosis of VAP were calculated taking CPIS score of >6 as index test for the diagnosis of VAP.

Results: Sixty patients were included in the study. Both NP-BAL and B-BAL had concordance with the CPIS at 69.1%. The concordance between NP-BAL and B-BAL was better at 67.6% with a kappa coefficient of 0.064 ( = -0.593). The yield and sensitivity of NP-BAL were comparable to that of B-BAL.

Conclusions: The blind NP-BAL is an equally effective method of airway sampling and could be a better alternative to replace more invasive B-BAL for microbiologic diagnosis of VAP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/aer.AER_5_21DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8159038PMC
March 2021

Comparative metagenomic analysis of rice soil samples revealed the diverse microbial population and biocontrol organisms against plant pathogenic fungus .

3 Biotech 2021 May 29;11(5):245. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Molsys Scientific Pvt. Ltd, Bangalore, 560064 India.

Intensive cropping degrades soil quality and disrupts the soil microbiome. To understand the effect of rice monocropping on soil-microbiome, we used a comparative 16S rRNA metagenome sequencing method to analyze the diversity of soil microflora at the genomic level. Soil samples were obtained from five locations viz., Chamarajnagara, Davangere, Gangavathi, Mandya, and Hassan of Karnataka, India. Chemical analysis of soil samples from these locations revealed significant variations in pH (6.00-8.38), electrical conductivity (0.17-0.69 dS m), organic carbon (0.51-1.29%), available nitrogen (279-551 kg ha), phosphorous (57-715 kg ha) and available potassium (121-564 kg ha). The 16S metagenome analysis revealed that the microbial diversity in Gangavathi soil samples was lower than in other locations. The soil sample of Gangavathi showed a higher abundance of Proteobacteria (85.78%) than Mandya (27.18%). The Firmicutes were more abundant in Chamarajnagar samples (36.01%). Furthermore, the KEGG pathway study revealed enriched nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium metabolism pathways in all soil samples. In terms of the distribution of beneficial microflora, the decomposers were more predominant than the nutrient recyclers such as nitrogen fixers, phosphorous mineralizers, and nitrifiers. Furthermore, we isolated culturable soil microbes and tested their antagonistic activity in vitro against a fungal pathogen of rice, strain MG01. Six sp. and two strains of showed higher antagonistic activity against MG01. Our findings indicate that metagenome sequencing can be used to investigate the diversity, distribution, and abundance of soil microflora in rice-growing areas. The knowledge gathered can be used to develop strategies for maintaining soil quality and crop conservation to increase crop productivity.

Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s13205-021-02783-y.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13205-021-02783-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8085183PMC
May 2021

An Unusual Case of Linear Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus.

Indian Dermatol Online J 2021 Mar-Apr;12(2):357-358. Epub 2021 Feb 22.

Department of Dermatology, University of Sydney, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_465_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8088164PMC
February 2021

Azithromycin-Induced Linear Fixed Drug Eruption: A Rare Instance.

Indian Dermatol Online J 2021 Mar-Apr;12(2):353-354. Epub 2021 Feb 22.

Department of Dermatology, Katihar Medical College and Hospital, Katihar, Bihar, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_422_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8088178PMC
February 2021

Newer Signs in Dermatology [2016-2020].

Indian Dermatol Online J 2021 Mar-Apr;12(2):342-345. Epub 2020 Sep 28.

Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Jawahar Lal Medical College and Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences, Sawangi, Wardha, Maharashtra, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_214_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8088181PMC
September 2020

Dermatoses in the Elderly: Clinico-Demographic Profile of Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Centre.

Indian J Dermatol 2021 Jan-Feb;66(1):74-80

Department of Dermatology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India.

Background: Elderly population is vulnerable to develop a multitude of dermatological diseases, owing to comorbidities and polypharmacies.

Objective: To know the prevalence of dermatological conditions in elderly patients attending outpatient department, determine the pattern and relative frequency of skin diseases, and find the relation with associated comorbidities.

Materials And Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study on 250 patients, aged ≥60 years. Clinical diagnosis was done, followed by appropriate investigations when required. Descriptive data was analyzed on the parameters of range, mean ± S.D., frequencies, etc., Continuous variables were analyzed using unpaired -test/Mann-Whitney U test and categorical data by Fisher's exact test/Chi-square test. Statistical software Medcalc version 10.2.0.0 for Windows vista was used. value =0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: 250 patients were evaluated, 164 males (65.5%) and 86 females (34.4%). Mean age was 67.87 ± 7.29 years. Commonest disease category was infection (30%), followed by dermatitis (29.6%), papulo-squamous (18.4%), and immunobullous (6.4%). Difference in acute and chronic disease was significant ( = 0.0001). 30% had infections; fungal (50.66%), bacterial (32%), and viral (17.33%). 74 patients had dermatitis (29.6% of study population). Commonest systemic disease was hypertension (23.2%), followed by diabetes mellitus (19.6%). Association of diabetes mellitus was significant ( = 0.0014), more in infective dermatoses ( = 0.0007). All had signs of aging; idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis (51.2%), xerosis (45.2%), seborrheic keratosis (42.6%), cherry angioma (33.2%), senile acne (6.6%). Photoaging was noted as wrinkling (98.8%), freckles (35.6%), purpura (10.8%), telangiectasia (5.6%). People involved in outdoor activity had higher Glogau scale (3.01 ± 0.69) compared to those indoors (2.44 ± 0.74), statistically significant difference ( = 0.001).

Conclusion: Our study is the first of its kind, in Eastern India, where we evaluated and explored the disease pattern and extent of geriatric dermatoses among patients attending dermatology OPD of a tertiary care hospital.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijd.IJD_245_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8061490PMC
April 2021

Therapeutic Modalities in Post Kala-azar Dermal Leishmaniasis: A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness and Safety of the Treatment Options.

Indian J Dermatol 2021 Jan-Feb;66(1):34-43

Department of Dermatology, Bankura Sammilani Medical College, Bankura, West Bengal, India.

Post-kala-azar dermal Leishmaniasis (PKDL) is one of the important neglected tropical diseases, which has a tremendous epidemiological significance, being the reservoir of kala-azar. Relapse and resistance to treatment along with the lack of a drug of choice and consensus treatment guideline pose a significant problem in the management of PKDL. The aim of this article was to review the available therapeutic options for PKDL, with special emphasis on their pharmaco-dynamics, pharmaco-kinetics, effectiveness, safety, tolerability, and cost factor. A comprehensive English language literature search was done for therapeutic options in PKDL across multiple databases (PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Cochrane) for keywords (alone and in combination). MeSH as well as non-MeSH terms such as "Kala-azar," "Leishmaniasis" AND "Treatment," "Management," "Antimony Sodium Gluconate," "Meglumine Antimoniate," "Amphotericin B," "Paromomycin," "Miltefosine" were taken into consideration. Among 576 relevant articles, 15 were deemed relevant to this review. These articles were evaluated using "Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM)" AND "strength of recommendation taxonomy" (SORT) with respect to the level of evidence and grade of recommendation. The review includes 15 studies. The use of sodium stibogluconate is being discouraged because of multiple documented reports of treatment failure. Liposomal amphotericin B is emerging as a favorable option, owing to its superiority in terms of effectiveness and safety profile. Miltesfosine is the drug of choice in India because of the ease of oral administration and minimal risk of toxicity. Isolated Paromomycin alone is not effective in PKDL; however, combination therapy with sodium stibogluconate is found to be safe and effective. Combination of amphotericin B and miltefosine is one of the excellent options. Immunotherapy with combination of alum-precipitated autoclaved Leishmania major (Alum/ALM) vaccine + Bacille Calmette-Gu´erin (BCG) has shown promising results. Kala-azar continues to haunt the tropical countries and PKDL being its reservoir is threatening its elimination. With the availability of drugs such as liposomal amphotericin B and miltefosine, apart from the advent of immunotherapy, the future of treatment of this condition looks promising.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijd.IJD_264_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8061474PMC
April 2021

Cutaneous Manifestations of Chronic Kidney Disease, Dialysis and Post-Renal Transplant: A Review.

Indian J Dermatol 2021 Jan-Feb;66(1):3-11

Department of Dermatology, KPC Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Skin serves as the mirror of underlying systemic problems. The early diagnosis of subtle cutaneous clinical pointers often helps in identifying renal disorders, obviating the delay in diagnosis and treatment. Cutaneous changes can be observed from the beginning of renal impairment until the evolution to terminal stage, in uremia, hemodialysis, and after kidney transplantation. In the review, we have discussed the cutaneous changes, its implicated etiopathogenesis, and their treatment options, as encountered in chronic kidney disease, hemodialysis and post-renal transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijd.IJD_502_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8061480PMC
April 2021

Phialemonium obovatum Infection of the Renal Allograft: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Exp Clin Transplant 2021 Apr 16. Epub 2021 Apr 16.

From the Department of Nephrology, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India.

In this case report, we describe the first case of Phialemonium obovatum infection involving the renal allograft in a recipient beyond 1 year after living renal transplant. The patient presented with a locally invasive mycetoma caused by this melanized fungus in the anterior abdominal wall, which extended during the hospital stay to involve the allograft. The fungus was identified by its characteristic micromorphological features present on potato dextrose agar and Sabourad dextrose agar and on subsequent slide cultures. The patient did not survive despite repeated surgical procedures, including partial allograft nephrectomy and broad-spectrum antifungal medications. Other cases of Phialemonium infections involving renal and stem cell transplant recipients are reviewed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6002/ect.2020.0313DOI Listing
April 2021

Unconventional uses of common conventional drugs: A review.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 Jul-Aug;87(4):592-598

Belle Vue Clinic, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/IJDVL_389_20DOI Listing
April 2020

The unprecedented epidemic-like scenario of dermatophytosis in India: II. Diagnostic methods and taxonomical aspects.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 May-Jun;87(3):326-332

Department of Dermatology, Bhojani Clinic, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

Trichophyton (T.) mentagrophytes now accounts for an overwhelming majority of clinical cases in India, a new "Indian genotype" (T. mentagrophytes ITS genotype VIII) having been isolated from skin samples obtained from cases across a wide geographical distribution in this country. The conventional diagnostic methods, like fungal culture, are, however, inadequate for diagnosing this agent. Thus, molecular methods of diagnosis are necessary for proper characterization of the causative agent. The shift in the predominant agent of dermatophytosis from T. rubrum to T. mentagrophytes, within a relatively short span of time, is without historic parallel. The apparent ease of transmission of a zoophilic fungus among human hosts can also be explained by means of mycological phenomena, like anthropization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/IJDVL_302_20DOI Listing
March 2020

Moniliform blepharosis: A characteristic sign of lipoid proteinosis.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 Apr 12:1-2. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Department of Dermatology, KPC Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/IJDVL_715_20DOI Listing
April 2021

The unprecedented epidemic-like scenario of dermatophytosis in India: I. Epidemiology, risk factors and clinical features.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 Mar-Apr;87(2):154-175

Bhojani Clinic, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

Dermatophytosis has attained unprecedented dimensions in recent years in India. Its clinical presentation is now multifarious, often with atypical morphology, severe forms and unusually extensive disease in all age groups. We hesitate to call it an epidemic owing to the lack of population-based prevalence surveys. In this part of the review, we discuss the epidemiology and clinical features of this contemporary problem. While the epidemiology is marked by a stark increase in the number of chronic, relapsing and recurrent cases, the clinical distribution is marked by a disproportionate rise in the number of cases with tinea corporis and cruris, cases presenting with the involvement of extensive areas, and tinea faciei.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/IJDVL_301_20DOI Listing
March 2020

Hand sanitizers: Science and rationale.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 Mar-Apr;87(2):309-314

Department of Dermatology, KPC Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/IJDVL_598_20DOI Listing
May 2020

Lead phytoremediation potentials of four aquatic macrophytes under hydroponic cultivation.

Int J Phytoremediation 2021 Mar 8:1-10. Epub 2021 Mar 8.

Aquatic toxicology and Remediation Laboratory, Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Assam University, Silchar, India.

Lead (Pb) is a major toxicological concern of the present day that demands immediate attention. The use of aquatic macrophytes with high Pb tolerance and accumulation may be a very convenient and economically viable solution for remediating Pb. We examined the ability of , and to remove 0.12 mM, 0.24 mM, 0.36 mM, and 0.48 mM Pb for 96-h under hydroponic cultivation system. The plants accumulated variable amounts of Pb: with low mobility of Pb from root to shoot. Lead uptake kinetics were monitored up to 96-h. After 96-h, the uptake efficiency for (98-99%), (79-96%), (45-79%), and (40-76%) was noted. For and an extremely high uptake rate was seen within the initial 24-h of trials, followed by slower uptake till 96-h. and worked best at 0.12 mM Pb. Pb-Phytotoxicity became prominent at 0.48 mM exposure with biomass loss and morphological changes. The plants had a quick growth rate, extensive root system, high biomass yield, and the ability to tolerate and accumulate Pb that made them suitable for phytoremediation purposes. : Lead phytoremediation potential of four aquatic macrophytes found in Indian waters was evaluated. These macrophytes, often considered as weeds, could be used for phytoremediation purposes that would turn out to be a sustainable means of the utilization of natural resources in developing countries like India. In this study, not only metal accumulation by plants but also the lead uptake kinetics at several time intervals and valuable growth attributes were estimated to establish the suitability of these plants as probable lead phytoremediators. Two of the plant species, , and , showed excellent Pb accumulation capacities that had not been reported earlier, to the best of our knowledge. The work is all the more significant as there have been needs for identifying Pb-phytoremediators well suited to native climate and growth conditions that could take up large amounts of metal from the substratum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15226514.2021.1895714DOI Listing
March 2021

Eponymous dermatological contributions linked to Josef Jadassohn.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 Feb 24:1-2. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

Department of Dermatology, KPC Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/IJDVL_757_20DOI Listing
February 2021

"Ring Within a Ring".

J Cutan Med Surg 2021 Mar 3:1203475421998629. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

189786 Department of Dermatology, KPC Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1203475421998629DOI Listing
March 2021

What is new in dermatotherapy?

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 Jan-Feb;87(1):135-143

Department of Dermatology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College and AVBR Hospital, Wardha, Maharashtra, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/IJDVL_342_20DOI Listing
March 2020

Glycolysis is integral to histamine-induced endothelial hyperpermeability.

FASEB J 2021 03;35(3):e21425

Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and University Clinic Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany.

Histamine-induced vascular leakage is a core process of allergic pathologies, including anaphylaxis. Here, we show that glycolysis is integral to histamine-induced endothelial barrier disruption and hyperpermeability. Histamine rapidly enhanced glycolysis in endothelial cells via a pathway that involved histamine receptor 1 and phospholipase C beta signaling. Consistently, partial inhibition of glycolysis with 3-(3-pyridinyl)-1-(4-pyridinyl)-2-propen-1-one (3PO) prevented histamine-induced hyperpermeability in human microvascular endothelial cells, by abolishing the histamine-induced actomyosin contraction, focal adherens junction formation, and endothelial barrier disruption. Pharmacologic blockade of glycolysis with 3PO in mice reduced histamine-induced vascular hyperpermeability, prevented vascular leakage in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and protected from systemic anaphylaxis. In conclusion, we elucidated the role of glycolysis in histamine-induced disruption of endothelial barrier integrity. Our data thereby point to endothelial glycolysis as a novel therapeutic target for human pathologies related to excessive vascular leakage, such as systemic anaphylaxis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1096/fj.202001634RDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7909462PMC
March 2021

Identical Alopecia Areata in Identical Twin Sisters.

Int J Trichology 2020 Sep-Oct;12(5):247-248. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

Department of Dermatology, KPC Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijt.ijt_120_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7832170PMC
November 2020
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