Publications by authors named "Anubha Mahajan"

164 Publications

The genomics of heart failure: design and rationale of the HERMES consortium.

ESC Heart Fail 2021 Sep 3. Epub 2021 Sep 3.

Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Aims: The HERMES (HEart failure Molecular Epidemiology for Therapeutic targetS) consortium aims to identify the genomic and molecular basis of heart failure.

Methods And Results: The consortium currently includes 51 studies from 11 countries, including 68 157 heart failure cases and 949 888 controls, with data on heart failure events and prognosis. All studies collected biological samples and performed genome-wide genotyping of common genetic variants. The enrolment of subjects into participating studies ranged from 1948 to the present day, and the median follow-up following heart failure diagnosis ranged from 2 to 116 months. Forty-nine of 51 individual studies enrolled participants of both sexes; in these studies, participants with heart failure were predominantly male (34-90%). The mean age at diagnosis or ascertainment across all studies ranged from 54 to 84 years. Based on the aggregate sample, we estimated 80% power to genetic variant associations with risk of heart failure with an odds ratio of ≥1.10 for common variants (allele frequency ≥ 0.05) and ≥1.20 for low-frequency variants (allele frequency 0.01-0.05) at P < 5 × 10 under an additive genetic model.

Conclusions: HERMES is a global collaboration aiming to (i) identify the genetic determinants of heart failure; (ii) generate insights into the causal pathways leading to heart failure and enable genetic approaches to target prioritization; and (iii) develop genomic tools for disease stratification and risk prediction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ehf2.13517DOI Listing
September 2021

Profiles of Glucose Metabolism in Different Prediabetes Phenotypes, Classified by Fasting Glycemia, 2-Hour OGTT, Glycated Hemoglobin, and 1-Hour OGTT: An IMI DIRECT Study.

Diabetes 2021 Sep 7;70(9):2092-2106. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

Department of Epidemiology and Data Science, Amsterdam Medical Centre, location VUMC, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Differences in glucose metabolism among categories of prediabetes have not been systematically investigated. In this longitudinal study, participants ( = 2,111) underwent a 2-h 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at baseline and 48 months. HbA was also measured. We classified participants as having isolated prediabetes defect (impaired fasting glucose [IFG], impaired glucose tolerance [IGT], or HbA indicative of prediabetes [IA1c]), two defects (IFG+IGT, IFG+IA1c, or IGT+IA1c), or all defects (IFG+IGT+IA1c). β-Cell function (BCF) and insulin sensitivity were assessed from OGTT. At baseline, in pooling of participants with isolated defects, they showed impairment in both BCF and insulin sensitivity compared with healthy control subjects. Pooled groups with two or three defects showed progressive further deterioration. Among groups with isolated defect, those with IGT showed lower insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion at reference glucose (ISR), and insulin secretion potentiation ( < 0.002). Conversely, those with IA1c showed higher insulin sensitivity and ISR ( < 0.0001). Among groups with two defects, we similarly found differences in both BCF and insulin sensitivity. At 48 months, we found higher type 2 diabetes incidence for progressively increasing number of prediabetes defects (odds ratio >2, < 0.008). In conclusion, the prediabetes groups showed differences in type/degree of glucometabolic impairment. Compared with the pooled group with isolated defects, those with double or triple defect showed progressive differences in diabetes incidence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db21-0227DOI Listing
September 2021

The trans-ancestral genomic architecture of glycemic traits.

Nat Genet 2021 06 31;53(6):840-860. Epub 2021 May 31.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Glycemic traits are used to diagnose and monitor type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic health. To date, most genetic studies of glycemic traits have focused on individuals of European ancestry. Here we aggregated genome-wide association studies comprising up to 281,416 individuals without diabetes (30% non-European ancestry) for whom fasting glucose, 2-h glucose after an oral glucose challenge, glycated hemoglobin and fasting insulin data were available. Trans-ancestry and single-ancestry meta-analyses identified 242 loci (99 novel; P < 5 × 10), 80% of which had no significant evidence of between-ancestry heterogeneity. Analyses restricted to individuals of European ancestry with equivalent sample size would have led to 24 fewer new loci. Compared with single-ancestry analyses, equivalent-sized trans-ancestry fine-mapping reduced the number of estimated variants in 99% credible sets by a median of 37.5%. Genomic-feature, gene-expression and gene-set analyses revealed distinct biological signatures for each trait, highlighting different underlying biological pathways. Our results increase our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology by using trans-ancestry studies for improved power and resolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-021-00852-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7610958PMC
June 2021

Analysis of overlapping genetic association in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Diabetologia 2021 Jun 8;64(6):1342-1347. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

JDRF/Wellcome Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory, Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Aims/hypothesis: Given the potential shared aetiology between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, we aimed to identify any genetic regions associated with both diseases. For associations where there is a shared signal and the allele that increases risk to one disease also increases risk to the other, inference about shared aetiology could be made, with the potential to develop therapeutic strategies to treat or prevent both diseases simultaneously. Alternatively, if a genetic signal co-localises with divergent effect directions, it could provide valuable biological insight into how the association affects the two diseases differently.

Methods: Using publicly available type 2 diabetes summary statistics from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of European ancestry individuals (74,124 cases and 824,006 controls) and type 1 diabetes GWAS summary statistics from a meta-analysis of studies on individuals from the UK and Sardinia (7467 cases and 10,218 controls), we identified all regions of 0.5 Mb that contained variants associated with both diseases (false discovery rate <0.01). In each region, we performed forward stepwise logistic regression to identify independent association signals, then examined co-localisation of each type 1 diabetes signal with each type 2 diabetes signal using coloc. Any association with a co-localisation posterior probability of ≥0.9 was considered a genuine shared association with both diseases.

Results: Of the 81 association signals from 42 genetic regions that showed association with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, four association signals co-localised between both diseases (posterior probability ≥0.9): (1) chromosome 16q23.1, near CTRB1/BCAR1, which has been previously identified; (2) chromosome 11p15.5, near the INS gene; (3) chromosome 4p16.3, near TMEM129 and (4) chromosome 1p31.3, near PGM1. In each of these regions, the effect of genetic variants on type 1 diabetes was in the opposite direction to the effect on type 2 diabetes. Use of additional datasets also supported the previously identified co-localisation on chromosome 9p24.2, near the GLIS3 gene, in this case with a concordant direction of effect.

Conclusions/interpretation: Four of five association signals that co-localise between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are in opposite directions, suggesting a complex genetic relationship between the two diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-021-05428-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8099827PMC
June 2021

Variation in the SERPINA6/SERPINA1 locus alters morning plasma cortisol, hepatic corticosteroid binding globulin expression, gene expression in peripheral tissues, and risk of cardiovascular disease.

J Hum Genet 2021 Jun 20;66(6):625-636. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute, University of Edinburgh, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG, Scotland.

The stress hormone cortisol modulates fuel metabolism, cardiovascular homoeostasis, mood, inflammation and cognition. The CORtisol NETwork (CORNET) consortium previously identified a single locus associated with morning plasma cortisol. Identifying additional genetic variants that explain more of the variance in cortisol could provide new insights into cortisol biology and provide statistical power to test the causative role of cortisol in common diseases. The CORNET consortium extended its genome-wide association meta-analysis for morning plasma cortisol from 12,597 to 25,314 subjects and from ~2.2 M to ~7 M SNPs, in 17 population-based cohorts of European ancestries. We confirmed the genetic association with SERPINA6/SERPINA1. This locus contains genes encoding corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) and α1-antitrypsin. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses undertaken in the STARNET cohort of 600 individuals showed that specific genetic variants within the SERPINA6/SERPINA1 locus influence expression of SERPINA6 rather than SERPINA1 in the liver. Moreover, trans-eQTL analysis demonstrated effects on adipose tissue gene expression, suggesting that variations in CBG levels have an effect on delivery of cortisol to peripheral tissues. Two-sample Mendelian randomisation analyses provided evidence that each genetically-determined standard deviation (SD) increase in morning plasma cortisol was associated with increased odds of chronic ischaemic heart disease (0.32, 95% CI 0.06-0.59) and myocardial infarction (0.21, 95% CI 0.00-0.43) in UK Biobank and similarly in CARDIoGRAMplusC4D. These findings reveal a causative pathway for CBG in determining cortisol action in peripheral tissues and thereby contributing to the aetiology of cardiovascular disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s10038-020-00895-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8144017PMC
June 2021

Sex-dimorphic genetic effects and novel loci for fasting glucose and insulin variability.

Nat Commun 2021 01 5;12(1):24. Epub 2021 Jan 5.

Department of Biostatistics and Data Science, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

Differences between sexes contribute to variation in the levels of fasting glucose and insulin. Epidemiological studies established a higher prevalence of impaired fasting glucose in men and impaired glucose tolerance in women, however, the genetic component underlying this phenomenon is not established. We assess sex-dimorphic (73,089/50,404 women and 67,506/47,806 men) and sex-combined (151,188/105,056 individuals) fasting glucose/fasting insulin genetic effects via genome-wide association study meta-analyses in individuals of European descent without diabetes. Here we report sex dimorphism in allelic effects on fasting insulin at IRS1 and ZNF12 loci, the latter showing higher RNA expression in whole blood in women compared to men. We also observe sex-homogeneous effects on fasting glucose at seven novel loci. Fasting insulin in women shows stronger genetic correlations than in men with waist-to-hip ratio and anorexia nervosa. Furthermore, waist-to-hip ratio is causally related to insulin resistance in women, but not in men. These results position dissection of metabolic and glycemic health sex dimorphism as a steppingstone for understanding differences in genetic effects between women and men in related phenotypes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19366-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7785747PMC
January 2021

Processes Underlying Glycemic Deterioration in Type 2 Diabetes: An IMI DIRECT Study.

Diabetes Care 2021 02 15;44(2):511-518. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Objective: We investigated the processes underlying glycemic deterioration in type 2 diabetes (T2D).

Research Design And Methods: A total of 732 recently diagnosed patients with T2D from the Innovative Medicines Initiative Diabetes Research on Patient Stratification (IMI DIRECT) study were extensively phenotyped over 3 years, including measures of insulin sensitivity (OGIS), β-cell glucose sensitivity (GS), and insulin clearance (CLIm) from mixed meal tests, liver enzymes, lipid profiles, and baseline regional fat from MRI. The associations between the longitudinal metabolic patterns and HbA deterioration, adjusted for changes in BMI and in diabetes medications, were assessed via stepwise multivariable linear and logistic regression.

Results: Faster HbA progression was independently associated with faster deterioration of OGIS and GS and increasing CLIm; visceral or liver fat, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides had further independent, though weaker, roles ( = 0.38). A subgroup of patients with a markedly higher progression rate (fast progressors) was clearly distinguishable considering these variables only (discrimination capacity from area under the receiver operating characteristic = 0.94). The proportion of fast progressors was reduced from 56% to 8-10% in subgroups in which only one trait among OGIS, GS, and CLIm was relatively stable (odds ratios 0.07-0.09). T2D polygenic risk score and baseline pancreatic fat, glucagon-like peptide 1, glucagon, diet, and physical activity did not show an independent role.

Conclusions: Deteriorating insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, increasing insulin clearance, high visceral or liver fat, and worsening of the lipid profile are the crucial factors mediating glycemic deterioration of patients with T2D in the initial phase of the disease. Stabilization of a single trait among insulin sensitivity, β-cell function, and insulin clearance may be relevant to prevent progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc20-1567DOI Listing
February 2021

Genetic Predisposition to Coronary Artery Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Circ Genom Precis Med 2020 12 13;13(6):e002769. Epub 2020 Aug 13.

The Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences & Informatics (A.D.M.), University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, U.K.

Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is accelerated in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D).

Methods: To test whether this reflects differential genetic influences on CAD risk in subjects with T2D, we performed a systematic assessment of genetic overlap between CAD and T2D in 66 643 subjects (27 708 with CAD and 24 259 with T2D). Variants showing apparent association with CAD in stratified analyses or evidence of interaction were evaluated in a further 117 787 subjects (16 694 with CAD and 11 537 with T2D).

Results: None of the previously characterized CAD loci was found to have specific effects on CAD in T2D individuals, and a genome-wide interaction analysis found no new variants for CAD that could be considered T2D specific. When we considered the overall genetic correlations between CAD and its risk factors, we found no substantial differences in these relationships by T2D background.

Conclusions: This study found no evidence that the genetic architecture of CAD differs in those with T2D compared with those without T2D.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCGEN.119.002769DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7748049PMC
December 2020

Sex Differences in the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease Associated With Type 2 Diabetes: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis.

Diabetes Care 2021 02 4;44(2):556-562. Epub 2020 Dec 4.

George Institute for Global Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K.

Objective: Observational studies have demonstrated that type 2 diabetes is a stronger risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) in women compared with men. However, it is not clear whether this reflects a sex differential in the causal effect of diabetes on CHD risk or results from sex-specific residual confounding.

Research Design And Methods: Using 270 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for type 2 diabetes identified in a type 2 diabetes genome-wide association study, we performed a sex-stratified Mendelian randomization (MR) study of type 2 diabetes and CHD using individual participant data in UK Biobank (251,420 women and 212,049 men). Weighted median, MR-Egger, MR-pleiotropy residual sum and outlier, and radial MR from summary-level analyses were used for pleiotropy assessment.

Results: MR analyses showed that genetic risk of type 2 diabetes increased the odds of CHD for women (odds ratio 1.13 [95% CI 1.08-1.18] per 1-log unit increase in odds of type 2 diabetes) and men (1.21 [1.17-1.26] per 1-log unit increase in odds of type 2 diabetes). Sensitivity analyses showed some evidence of directional pleiotropy; however, results were similar after correction for outlier SNPs.

Conclusions: This MR analysis supports a causal effect of genetic liability to type 2 diabetes on risk of CHD that is not stronger for women than men. Assuming a lack of bias, these findings suggest that the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes for CHD risk reduction is of equal priority in both sexes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc20-1137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7818328PMC
February 2021

Whole blood co-expression modules associate with metabolic traits and type 2 diabetes: an IMI-DIRECT study.

Genome Med 2020 12 1;12(1):109. Epub 2020 Dec 1.

NIHR Exeter Clinical Research Facility, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK.

Background: The rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) poses a major global challenge. It remains unresolved to what extent transcriptomic signatures of metabolic dysregulation and T2D can be observed in easily accessible tissues such as blood. Additionally, large-scale human studies are required to further our understanding of the putative inflammatory component of insulin resistance and T2D. Here we used transcriptomics data from individuals with (n = 789) and without (n = 2127) T2D from the IMI-DIRECT cohorts to describe the co-expression structure of whole blood that mainly reflects processes and cell types of the immune system, and how it relates to metabolically relevant clinical traits and T2D.

Methods: Clusters of co-expressed genes were identified in the non-diabetic IMI-DIRECT cohort and evaluated with regard to stability, as well as preservation and rewiring in the cohort of individuals with T2D. We performed functional and immune cell signature enrichment analyses, and a genome-wide association study to describe the genetic regulation of the modules. Phenotypic and trans-omics associations of the transcriptomic modules were investigated across both IMI-DIRECT cohorts.

Results: We identified 55 whole blood co-expression modules, some of which clustered in larger super-modules. We identified a large number of associations between these transcriptomic modules and measures of insulin action and glucose tolerance. Some of the metabolically linked modules reflect neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in blood while others are independent of white blood cell estimates, including a module of genes encoding neutrophil granule proteins with antibacterial properties for which the strongest associations with clinical traits and T2D status were observed. Through the integration of genetic and multi-omics data, we provide a holistic view of the regulation and molecular context of whole blood transcriptomic modules. We furthermore identified an overlap between genetic signals for T2D and co-expression modules involved in type II interferon signaling.

Conclusions: Our results offer a large-scale map of whole blood transcriptomic modules in the context of metabolic disease and point to novel biological candidates for future studies related to T2D.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13073-020-00806-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7708171PMC
December 2020

Post-load glucose subgroups and associated metabolic traits in individuals with type 2 diabetes: An IMI-DIRECT study.

PLoS One 2020 30;15(11):e0242360. Epub 2020 Nov 30.

Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva Medical School, Geneva, Switzerland.

Aim: Subclasses of different glycaemic disturbances could explain the variation in characteristics of individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). We aimed to examine the association between subgroups based on their glucose curves during a five-point mixed-meal tolerance test (MMT) and metabolic traits at baseline and glycaemic deterioration in individuals with T2D.

Methods: The study included 787 individuals with newly diagnosed T2D from the Diabetes Research on Patient Stratification (IMI-DIRECT) Study. Latent class trajectory analysis (LCTA) was used to identify distinct glucose curve subgroups during a five-point MMT. Using general linear models, these subgroups were associated with metabolic traits at baseline and after 18 months of follow up, adjusted for potential confounders.

Results: At baseline, we identified three glucose curve subgroups, labelled in order of increasing glucose peak levels as subgroup 1-3. Individuals in subgroup 2 and 3 were more likely to have higher levels of HbA1c, triglycerides and BMI at baseline, compared to those in subgroup 1. At 18 months (n = 651), the beta coefficients (95% CI) for change in HbA1c (mmol/mol) increased across subgroups with 0.37 (-0.18-1.92) for subgroup 2 and 1.88 (-0.08-3.85) for subgroup 3, relative to subgroup 1. The same trend was observed for change in levels of triglycerides and fasting glucose.

Conclusions: Different glycaemic profiles with different metabolic traits and different degrees of subsequent glycaemic deterioration can be identified using data from a frequently sampled mixed-meal tolerance test in individuals with T2D. Subgroups with the highest peaks had greater metabolic risk.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0242360PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7703960PMC
January 2021

Discovery of rare variants associated with blood pressure regulation through meta-analysis of 1.3 million individuals.

Nat Genet 2020 12 23;52(12):1314-1332. Epub 2020 Nov 23.

Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.

Genetic studies of blood pressure (BP) to date have mainly analyzed common variants (minor allele frequency > 0.05). In a meta-analysis of up to ~1.3 million participants, we discovered 106 new BP-associated genomic regions and 87 rare (minor allele frequency ≤ 0.01) variant BP associations (P < 5 × 10), of which 32 were in new BP-associated loci and 55 were independent BP-associated single-nucleotide variants within known BP-associated regions. Average effects of rare variants (44% coding) were ~8 times larger than common variant effects and indicate potential candidate causal genes at new and known loci (for example, GATA5 and PLCB3). BP-associated variants (including rare and common) were enriched in regions of active chromatin in fetal tissues, potentially linking fetal development with BP regulation in later life. Multivariable Mendelian randomization suggested possible inverse effects of elevated systolic and diastolic BP on large artery stroke. Our study demonstrates the utility of rare-variant analyses for identifying candidate genes and the results highlight potential therapeutic targets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-020-00713-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7610439PMC
December 2020

A Multi-omic Integrative Scheme Characterizes Tissues of Action at Loci Associated with Type 2 Diabetes.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 12 12;107(6):1011-1028. Epub 2020 Nov 12.

The Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7BN, UK; Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7LE, UK. Electronic address:

Resolving the molecular processes that mediate genetic risk remains a challenge because most disease-associated variants are non-coding and functional characterization of these signals requires knowledge of the specific tissues and cell-types in which they operate. To address this challenge, we developed a framework for integrating tissue-specific gene expression and epigenomic maps to obtain "tissue-of-action" (TOA) scores for each association signal by systematically partitioning posterior probabilities from Bayesian fine-mapping. We applied this scheme to credible set variants for 380 association signals from a recent GWAS meta-analysis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Europeans. The resulting tissue profiles underscored a predominant role for pancreatic islets and, to a lesser extent, adipose and liver, particularly among signals with greater fine-mapping resolution. We incorporated resulting TOA scores into a rule-based classifier and validated the tissue assignments through comparison with data from cis-eQTL enrichment, functional fine-mapping, RNA co-expression, and patterns of physiological association. In addition to implicating signals with a single TOA, we found evidence for signals with shared effects in multiple tissues as well as distinct tissue profiles between independent signals within heterogeneous loci. Lastly, we demonstrated that TOA scores can be directly coupled with eQTL colocalization to further resolve effector transcripts at T2D signals. This framework guides mechanistic inference by directing functional validation studies to the most relevant tissues and can gain power as fine-mapping resolution and cell-specific annotations become richer. This method is generalizable to all complex traits with relevant annotation data and is made available as an R package.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.10.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7820628PMC
December 2020

Genetic variant effects on gene expression in human pancreatic islets and their implications for T2D.

Nat Commun 2020 09 30;11(1):4912. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.

Most signals detected by genome-wide association studies map to non-coding sequence and their tissue-specific effects influence transcriptional regulation. However, key tissues and cell-types required for functional inference are absent from large-scale resources. Here we explore the relationship between genetic variants influencing predisposition to type 2 diabetes (T2D) and related glycemic traits, and human pancreatic islet transcription using data from 420 donors. We find: (a) 7741 cis-eQTLs in islets with a replication rate across 44 GTEx tissues between 40% and 73%; (b) marked overlap between islet cis-eQTL signals and active regulatory sequences in islets, with reduced eQTL effect size observed in the stretch enhancers most strongly implicated in GWAS signal location; (c) enrichment of islet cis-eQTL signals with T2D risk variants identified in genome-wide association studies; and (d) colocalization between 47 islet cis-eQTLs and variants influencing T2D or glycemic traits, including DGKB and TCF7L2. Our findings illustrate the advantages of performing functional and regulatory studies in disease relevant tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-18581-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7528108PMC
September 2020

Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Glucose Sensitivity.

J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2021 01;106(1):80-90

Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Context: Pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensitivity is the slope of the plasma glucose-insulin secretion relationship and is a key predictor of deteriorating glucose tolerance and development of type 2 diabetes. However, there are no large-scale studies looking at the genetic determinants of beta-cell glucose sensitivity.

Objective: To understand the genetic determinants of pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensitivity using genome-wide meta-analysis and candidate gene studies.

Design: We performed a genome-wide meta-analysis for beta-cell glucose sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes and nondiabetic subjects from 6 independent cohorts (n = 5706). Beta-cell glucose sensitivity was calculated from mixed meal and oral glucose tolerance tests, and its associations between known glycemia-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide association study (GWAS) SNPs were estimated using linear regression models.

Results: Beta-cell glucose sensitivity was moderately heritable (h2 ranged from 34% to 55%) using SNP and family-based analyses. GWAS meta-analysis identified multiple correlated SNPs in the CDKAL1 gene and GIPR-QPCTL gene loci that reached genome-wide significance, with SNP rs2238691 in GIPR-QPCTL (P value = 2.64 × 10-9) and rs9368219 in the CDKAL1 (P value = 3.15 × 10-9) showing the strongest association with beta-cell glucose sensitivity. These loci surpassed genome-wide significance when the GWAS meta-analysis was repeated after exclusion of the diabetic subjects. After correction for multiple testing, glycemia-associated SNPs in or near the HHEX and IGF2B2 loci were also associated with beta-cell glucose sensitivity.

Conclusion: We show that, variation at the GIPR-QPCTL and CDKAL1 loci are key determinants of pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensitivity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/clinem/dgaa653DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7765651PMC
January 2021

Genetic Studies of Leptin Concentrations Implicate Leptin in the Regulation of Early Adiposity.

Diabetes 2020 12 11;69(12):2806-2818. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Leptin influences food intake by informing the brain about the status of body fat stores. Rare mutations associated with congenital leptin deficiency cause severe early-onset obesity that can be mitigated by administering leptin. However, the role of genetic regulation of leptin in polygenic obesity remains poorly understood. We performed an exome-based analysis in up to 57,232 individuals of diverse ancestries to identify genetic variants that influence adiposity-adjusted leptin concentrations. We identify five novel variants, including four missense variants, in , , , and , and one intergenic variant near The missense variant Val94Met (rs17151919) in was common in individuals of African ancestry only, and its association with lower leptin concentrations was specific to this ancestry ( = 2 × 10, = 3,901). Using in vitro analyses, we show that the Met94 allele decreases leptin secretion. We also show that the Met94 allele is associated with higher BMI in young African-ancestry children but not in adults, suggesting that leptin regulates early adiposity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db20-0070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7679778PMC
December 2020

Unsupervised Clustering of Missense Variants in HNF1A Using Multidimensional Functional Data Aids Clinical Interpretation.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 10 9;107(4):670-682. Epub 2020 Sep 9.

Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LE, UK; Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN, UK; Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Churchill Hospital, Oxford OX3 7LE, UK; Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5101, USA.

Exome sequencing in diabetes presents a diagnostic challenge because depending on frequency, functional impact, and genomic and environmental contexts, HNF1A variants can cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), increase type 2 diabetes risk, or be benign. A correct diagnosis matters as it informs on treatment, progression, and family risk. We describe a multi-dimensional functional dataset of 73 HNF1A missense variants identified in exomes of 12,940 individuals. Our aim was to develop an analytical framework for stratifying variants along the HNF1A phenotypic continuum to facilitate diagnostic interpretation. HNF1A variant function was determined by four different molecular assays. Structure of the multi-dimensional dataset was explored using principal component analysis, k-means, and hierarchical clustering. Weights for tissue-specific isoform expression and functional domain were integrated. Functionally annotated variant subgroups were used to re-evaluate genetic diagnoses in national MODY diagnostic registries. HNF1A variants demonstrated a range of behaviors across the assays. The structure of the multi-parametric data was shaped primarily by transactivation. Using unsupervised learning methods, we obtained high-resolution functional clusters of the variants that separated known causal MODY variants from benign and type 2 diabetes risk variants and led to reclassification of 4% and 9% of HNF1A variants identified in the UK and Norway MODY diagnostic registries, respectively. Our proof-of-principle analyses facilitated informative stratification of HNF1A variants along the continuum, allowing improved evaluation of clinical significance, management, and precision medicine in diabetes clinics. Transcriptional activity appears a superior readout supporting pursuit of transactivation-centric experimental designs for high-throughput functional screens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.08.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7536579PMC
October 2020

Large-Scale Analyses Provide No Evidence for Gene-Gene Interactions Influencing Type 2 Diabetes Risk.

Diabetes 2020 11 21;69(11):2518-2522. Epub 2020 Aug 21.

Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K.

A growing number of genetic loci have been shown to influence individual predisposition to type 2 diabetes (T2D). Despite longstanding interest in understanding whether nonlinear interactions between these risk variants additionally influence T2D risk, the ability to detect significant gene-gene interaction (GGI) effects has been limited to date. To increase power to detect GGI effects, we combined recent advances in the fine-mapping of causal T2D risk variants with the increased sample size available within UK Biobank (375,736 unrelated European participants, including 16,430 with T2D). In addition to conventional single variant-based analysis, we used a complementary polygenic score-based approach, which included partitioned T2D risk scores that capture biological processes relevant to T2D pathophysiology. Nevertheless, we found no evidence in support of GGI effects influencing T2D risk. The current study was powered to detect interactions between common variants with odds ratios >1.2, so these findings place limits on the contribution of GGIs to the overall heritability of T2D.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db20-0224DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7576558PMC
November 2020

Dietary metabolite profiling brings new insight into the relationship between nutrition and metabolic risk: An IMI DIRECT study.

EBioMedicine 2020 Aug 4;58:102932. Epub 2020 Aug 4.

The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: Dietary advice remains the cornerstone of prevention and management of type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, understanding the efficacy of dietary interventions is confounded by the challenges inherent in assessing free living diet. Here we profiled dietary metabolites to investigate glycaemic deterioration and cardiometabolic risk in people at risk of or living with T2D.

Methods: We analysed data from plasma collected at baseline and 18-month follow-up in individuals from the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) Diabetes Research on Patient Stratification (DIRECT) cohort 1 n = 403 individuals with normal or impaired glucose regulation (prediabetic) and cohort 2 n = 458 individuals with new onset of T2D. A dietary metabolite profile model (T) was constructed using multivariable regression of 113 plasma metabolites obtained from targeted metabolomics assays. The continuous T score was used to explore the relationships between diet, glycaemic deterioration and cardio-metabolic risk via multiple linear regression models.

Findings: A higher T score was associated with healthier diets high in wholegrain (β=3.36 g, 95% CI 0.31, 6.40 and β=2.82 g, 95% CI 0.06, 5.57) and lower energy intake (β=-75.53 kcal, 95% CI -144.71, -2.35 and β=-122.51 kcal, 95% CI -186.56, -38.46), and saturated fat (β=-0.92 g, 95% CI -1.56, -0.28 and β=-0.98 g, 95% CI -1.53, -0.42 g), respectively for cohort 1 and 2. In both cohorts a higher T score was also associated with lower total body adiposity and favourable lipid profiles HDL-cholesterol (β=0.07 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.03, 0.1), (β=0.08 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.04, 0.1), and triglycerides (β=-0.1 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.2, -0.03), (β=-0.2 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.3, -0.09), respectively for cohort 1 and 2. In cohort 2, the T score was negatively associated with liver fat (β=-0.74%, 95% CI -0.67, -0.81), and lower fasting concentrations of HbA1c (β=-0.9 mmol/mol, 95% CI -1.5, -0.1), glucose (β=-0.2 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.4, -0.05) and insulin (β=-11.0 pmol/mol, 95% CI -19.5, -2.6). Longitudinal analysis showed at 18-month follow up a higher T score was also associated lower total body adiposity in both cohorts and lower fasting glucose (β=-0.2 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.3, -0.01) and insulin (β=-9.2 pmol/mol, 95% CI -17.9, -0.4) concentrations in cohort 2.

Interpretation: Plasma dietary metabolite profiling provides objective measures of diet intake, showing a relationship to glycaemic deterioration and cardiometabolic health.

Funding: This work was supported by the Innovative Medicines Initiative Joint Undertaking under grant agreement no. 115,317 (DIRECT), resources of which are composed of financial contribution from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) and EFPIA companies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2020.102932DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7406914PMC
August 2020

Fine-scale population structure in the UK Biobank: implications for genome-wide association studies.

Hum Mol Genet 2020 09;29(16):2803-2811

Department of Biostatistics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GA, UK.

The UK Biobank is a prospective study of more than 500 000 participants, which has aggregated data from questionnaires, physical measures, biomarkers, imaging and follow-up for a wide range of health-related outcomes, together with genome-wide genotyping supplemented with high-density imputation. Previous studies have highlighted fine-scale population structure in the UK on a North-West to South-East cline, but the impact of unmeasured geographical confounding on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of complex human traits in the UK Biobank has not been investigated. We considered 368 325 white British individuals from the UK Biobank and performed GWAS of their birth location. We demonstrate that widely used approaches to adjust for population structure, including principal component analysis and mixed modelling with a random effect for a genetic relationship matrix, cannot fully account for the fine-scale geographical confounding in the UK Biobank. We observe significant genetic correlation of birth location with a range of lifestyle-related traits, including body-mass index and fat mass, hypertension and lung function, even after adjustment for population structure. Variants driving associations with birth location are also strongly associated with many of these lifestyle-related traits after correction for population structure, indicating that there could be environmental factors that are confounded with geography that have not been adequately accounted for. Our findings highlight the need for caution in the interpretation of lifestyle-related trait GWAS in UK Biobank, particularly in loci demonstrating strong residual association with birth location.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddaa157DOI Listing
September 2020

Predicting and elucidating the etiology of fatty liver disease: A machine learning modeling and validation study in the IMI DIRECT cohorts.

PLoS Med 2020 06 19;17(6):e1003149. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Internal Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.

Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is highly prevalent and causes serious health complications in individuals with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D). Early diagnosis of NAFLD is important, as this can help prevent irreversible damage to the liver and, ultimately, hepatocellular carcinomas. We sought to expand etiological understanding and develop a diagnostic tool for NAFLD using machine learning.

Methods And Findings: We utilized the baseline data from IMI DIRECT, a multicenter prospective cohort study of 3,029 European-ancestry adults recently diagnosed with T2D (n = 795) or at high risk of developing the disease (n = 2,234). Multi-omics (genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) and clinical (liver enzymes and other serological biomarkers, anthropometry, measures of beta-cell function, insulin sensitivity, and lifestyle) data comprised the key input variables. The models were trained on MRI-image-derived liver fat content (<5% or ≥5%) available for 1,514 participants. We applied LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) to select features from the different layers of omics data and random forest analysis to develop the models. The prediction models included clinical and omics variables separately or in combination. A model including all omics and clinical variables yielded a cross-validated receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (ROCAUC) of 0.84 (95% CI 0.82, 0.86; p < 0.001), which compared with a ROCAUC of 0.82 (95% CI 0.81, 0.83; p < 0.001) for a model including 9 clinically accessible variables. The IMI DIRECT prediction models outperformed existing noninvasive NAFLD prediction tools. One limitation is that these analyses were performed in adults of European ancestry residing in northern Europe, and it is unknown how well these findings will translate to people of other ancestries and exposed to environmental risk factors that differ from those of the present cohort. Another key limitation of this study is that the prediction was done on a binary outcome of liver fat quantity (<5% or ≥5%) rather than a continuous one.

Conclusions: In this study, we developed several models with different combinations of clinical and omics data and identified biological features that appear to be associated with liver fat accumulation. In general, the clinical variables showed better prediction ability than the complex omics variables. However, the combination of omics and clinical variables yielded the highest accuracy. We have incorporated the developed clinical models into a web interface (see: https://www.predictliverfat.org/) and made it available to the community.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03814915.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1003149DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7304567PMC
June 2020

Identification of type 2 diabetes loci in 433,540 East Asian individuals.

Nature 2020 06 6;582(7811):240-245. Epub 2020 May 6.

Vanderbilt Genetics Institute, Division of Genetic Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.

Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 240 loci that are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, most of these loci have been identified in analyses of individuals with European ancestry. Here, to examine T2D risk in East Asian individuals, we carried out a meta-analysis of GWAS data from 77,418 individuals with T2D and 356,122 healthy control individuals. In the main analysis, we identified 301 distinct association signals at 183 loci, and across T2D association models with and without consideration of body mass index and sex, we identified 61 loci that are newly implicated in predisposition to T2D. Common variants associated with T2D in both East Asian and European populations exhibited strongly correlated effect sizes. Previously undescribed associations include signals in or near GDAP1, PTF1A, SIX3, ALDH2, a microRNA cluster, and genes that affect the differentiation of muscle and adipose cells. At another locus, expression quantitative trait loci at two overlapping T2D signals affect two genes-NKX6-3 and ANK1-in different tissues. Association studies in diverse populations identify additional loci and elucidate disease-associated genes, biology, and pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2263-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7292783PMC
June 2020

RSPO3 impacts body fat distribution and regulates adipose cell biology in vitro.

Nat Commun 2020 06 3;11(1):2797. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7LE, UK.

Fat distribution is an independent cardiometabolic risk factor. However, its molecular and cellular underpinnings remain obscure. Here we demonstrate that two independent GWAS signals at RSPO3, which are associated with increased body mass index-adjusted waist-to-hip ratio, act to specifically increase RSPO3 expression in subcutaneous adipocytes. These variants are also associated with reduced lower-body fat, enlarged gluteal adipocytes and insulin resistance. Based on human cellular studies RSPO3 may limit gluteofemoral adipose tissue (AT) expansion by suppressing adipogenesis and increasing gluteal adipocyte susceptibility to apoptosis. RSPO3 may also promote upper-body fat distribution by stimulating abdominal adipose progenitor (AP) proliferation. The distinct biological responses elicited by RSPO3 in abdominal versus gluteal APs in vitro are associated with differential changes in WNT signalling. Zebrafish carrying a nonsense rspo3 mutation display altered fat distribution. Our study identifies RSPO3 as an important determinant of peripheral AT storage capacity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-16592-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7271210PMC
June 2020

Multi-ancestry GWAS of the electrocardiographic PR interval identifies 202 loci underlying cardiac conduction.

Nat Commun 2020 05 21;11(1):2542. Epub 2020 May 21.

Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

The electrocardiographic PR interval reflects atrioventricular conduction, and is associated with conduction abnormalities, pacemaker implantation, atrial fibrillation (AF), and cardiovascular mortality. Here we report a multi-ancestry (N = 293,051) genome-wide association meta-analysis for the PR interval, discovering 202 loci of which 141 have not previously been reported. Variants at identified loci increase the percentage of heritability explained, from 33.5% to 62.6%. We observe enrichment for cardiac muscle developmental/contractile and cytoskeletal genes, highlighting key regulation processes for atrioventricular conduction. Additionally, 8 loci not previously reported harbor genes underlying inherited arrhythmic syndromes and/or cardiomyopathies suggesting a role for these genes in cardiovascular pathology in the general population. We show that polygenic predisposition to PR interval duration is an endophenotype for cardiovascular disease, including distal conduction disease, AF, and atrioventricular pre-excitation. These findings advance our understanding of the polygenic basis of cardiac conduction, and the genetic relationship between PR interval duration and cardiovascular disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-15706-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7242331PMC
May 2020

Multifaceted genome-wide study identifies novel regulatory loci in SLC22A11 and ZNF45 for body mass index in Indians.

Mol Genet Genomics 2020 Jul 4;295(4):1013-1026. Epub 2020 May 4.

Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology Campus, New Delhi, India.

Obesity, a risk factor for multiple diseases (e.g. diabetes, hypertension, cancers) originates through complex interactions between genes and prevailing environment (food habit and lifestyle) that varies across populations. Indians exhibit a unique obesity phenotype with high abdominal adiposity for a given body weight compared to matched white populations suggesting presence of population-specific genetic and environmental factors influencing obesity. However, Indian population-specific genetic contributors for obesity have not been explored yet. Therefore, to identify potential genetic contributors, we performed a two-staged genome-wide association study (GWAS) for body mass index (BMI), a common measure to evaluate obesity in 5973 Indian adults and the lead findings were further replicated in 1286 Indian adolescents. Our study revealed novel association of variants-rs6913677 in BAI3 gene (p = 1.08 × 10) and rs2078267 in SLC22A11 gene (p = 4.62 × 10) at GWAS significance, and of rs8100011 in ZNF45 gene (p = 1.04 × 10) with near GWAS significance. As genetic loci may dictate the phenotype through modulation of epigenetic processes, we overlapped genetic data of identified signals with their DNA methylation patterns in 236 Indian individuals and performed methylation quantitative trait loci (meth-QTL) analysis. Further, functional roles of discovered variants and underlying genes were speculated using publicly available gene regulatory databases (ENCODE, JASPAR, GeneHancer, GTEx). The identified variants in BAI3 and SLC22A11 genes were found to dictate methylation patterns at unique CpGs harboring critical cis-regulatory elements. Further, BAI3, SLC22A11 and ZNF45 variants were located in repressive chromatin, active enhancer, and active chromatin regions, respectively, in human subcutaneous adipose tissue in ENCODE database. Additionally, these genomic regions represented potential binding sites for key transcription factors implicated in obesity and/or metabolic disorders. Interestingly, GTEx portal identify rs8100011 as a robust cis-expression quantitative trait locus (cis-eQTL) in subcutaneous adipose tissue (p = 1.6 × 10), and ZNF45 gene expression in skeletal muscle of Indian subjects showed an inverse correlation with BMI indicating its possible role in obesity. In conclusion, our study discovered 3 novel population-specific functional genetic variants (rs6913677, rs2078267, rs8100011) in 2 novel (SLC22A11 and ZNF45) and 1 earlier reported gene (BAI3) for BMI in Indians. Our study decodes key genomic loci underlying obesity phenotype in Indians that may serve as prospective drug targets in future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00438-020-01678-6DOI Listing
July 2020

Early Metabolic Features of Genetic Liability to Type 2 Diabetes: Cohort Study With Repeated Metabolomics Across Early Life.

Diabetes Care 2020 07 28;43(7):1537-1545. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, U.K.

Objective: Type 2 diabetes develops for many years before diagnosis. We aimed to reveal early metabolic features characterizing liability to adult disease by examining genetic liability to adult type 2 diabetes in relation to metabolomic traits across early life.

Research Design And Methods: Up to 4,761 offspring from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children were studied. Linear models were used to examine effects of a genetic risk score (162 variants) for adult type 2 diabetes on 229 metabolomic traits (lipoprotein subclass-specific cholesterol and triglycerides, amino acids, glycoprotein acetyls, and others) measured at age 8 years, 16 years, 18 years, and 25 years. Two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) was also conducted using genome-wide association study data on metabolomic traits in an independent sample of 24,925 adults.

Results: At age 8 years, associations were most evident for type 2 diabetes liability (per SD higher) with lower lipids in HDL subtypes (e.g., -0.03 SD [95% CI -0.06, -0.003] for total lipids in very large HDL). At 16 years, associations were stronger with preglycemic traits, including citrate and with glycoprotein acetyls (0.05 SD; 95% CI 0.01, 0.08), and at 18 years, associations were stronger with branched-chain amino acids. At 25 years, associations had strengthened with VLDL lipids and remained consistent with previously altered traits, including HDL lipids. Two-sample MR estimates among adults indicated persistent patterns of effect of disease liability.

Conclusions: Our results support perturbed HDL lipid metabolism as one of the earliest features of type 2 diabetes liability, alongside higher branched-chain amino acid and inflammatory levels. Several features are apparent in childhood as early as age 8 years, decades before the clinical onset of disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc19-2348DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7305012PMC
July 2020

Using human genetics to understand the disease impacts of testosterone in men and women.

Nat Med 2020 02 10;26(2):252-258. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Medical Research Council (MRC) Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Testosterone supplementation is commonly used for its effects on sexual function, bone health and body composition, yet its effects on disease outcomes are unknown. To better understand this, we identified genetic determinants of testosterone levels and related sex hormone traits in 425,097 UK Biobank study participants. Using 2,571 genome-wide significant associations, we demonstrate that the genetic determinants of testosterone levels are substantially different between sexes and that genetically higher testosterone is harmful for metabolic diseases in women but beneficial in men. For example, a genetically determined 1 s.d. higher testosterone increases the risks of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio (OR) = 1.37 (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.22-1.53)) and polycystic ovary syndrome (OR = 1.51 (95% CI: 1.33-1.72)) in women, but reduces type 2 diabetes risk in men (OR = 0.86 (95% CI: 0.76-0.98)). We also show adverse effects of higher testosterone on breast and endometrial cancers in women and prostate cancer in men. Our findings provide insights into the disease impacts of testosterone and highlight the importance of sex-specific genetic analyses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-0751-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7025895PMC
February 2020
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