Prof. Antonio Sousa-Uva, PhD - National School of Public Health/new University of Lisbon - Full professor

Prof. Antonio Sousa-Uva

PhD

National School of Public Health/new University of Lisbon

Full professor

Lisbon | Portugal

Main Specialties: Allergy & Immunology, Other, Public Health

Additional Specialties: Occupational Medicine

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-7751-5430

Prof. Antonio Sousa-Uva, PhD - National School of Public Health/new University of Lisbon - Full professor

Prof. Antonio Sousa-Uva

PhD

Introduction

Occupational Physician, Allergy Specialist and Full Professor of NOVA University of Lisbon.

Primary Affiliation: National School of Public Health/new University of Lisbon - Lisbon , Portugal

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Jan 1998
NOVA University of Lisbon
PhD
Jan 1971 - Jan 1977
NOVA Medical School, Lisbon
MD

Experience

Jul 2014
Head of Occupational Medicine Education Programe
Head
Jan 2000
Head of Department
Full Prof.
Occ. Environm. Health

Publications

31Publications

2378Reads

201Profile Views

16PubMed Central Citations

Functional effects of differentially expressed microRNAs in A549 cells exposed to MWCNT-7 or crocidolite.

Toxicol Lett 2020 Aug 18;328:7-18. Epub 2020 Apr 18.

Department of Human Genetics, National Institute of Health Doutor Ricardo Jorge (INSA), Av. Padre Cruz, 1649-016 Lisbon, Portugal; Center for Toxicogenomics and Human Health (ToxOmics), NOVA Medical School-FCM, UNL, Rua Câmara Pestana, 6 Ed, CEDOC II 1150-082 Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2020.04.002DOI Listing
August 2020
3.262 Impact Factor

Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of MWCNT-7 and crocidolite: assessment in alveolar epithelial cells their coculture with monocyte-derived macrophages.

Nanotoxicology 2020 05 12;14(4):479-503. Epub 2020 Feb 12.

Department of Human Genetics, National Institute of Health Doutor Ricardo Jorge, Lisbon, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17435390.2019.1695975DOI Listing
May 2020
6.411 Impact Factor

Workplace Violence in Healthcare: A Single-Center Study on Causes, Consequences and Prevention Strategies.

Acta Med Port 2020 Jan 3;33(1):31-37. Epub 2020 Jan 3.

CISP - Centro de Investigação em Saúde Pública. CHRC - Comprehensive Health Research Center. Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública. Universidade NOVA de Lisboa. Lisboa. Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.20344/amp.11465DOI Listing
January 2020

Working conditions and high emotional exhaustion among hospital nurses.

Rev Bras Med Trab 2019 9;17(1):69-75. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Instituto Universitário de Lisboa - Lisboa, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5327/Z1679443520190339DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7138497PMC
January 2020

Low-Back Pain (LBP), Work and Absenteeism: a follow-up study

SHO2019: INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE

Low back pain (LBP) is a big concern in Occupational Health (OH). LBP prevention and work-absenteeism decline is a common objective for workers and employers. Ooccupational LBP Work-related Absenteeism is a problem for OH namely related with the probability of chronicity and the inefficacy of prevention measures. In this study, workers filled out two questionnaires, the first gathering data on socio-demographic and work-related features, general health, LBP episodes in the last 12 months, and the second, 18 months after, for LBP episodes and related absenteeism. 745 workers answered the first questionnaire and 649 the second. Among the 745 workers from different companies (A, B, C, D), 507 (69%) reported LBP in the last year (A 78,4%; B 60%; C 67%; D 77%) and 37.1% need medical care for the LBP. Absenteeism was present for 4.7%. Among the 649 workers that answer the 2nd questionnaire 38.4% have a LBP event in the previously 18 months and from those 65.8% refer more than 3 episodes. 5.6% reported LBP related absenteeism and 207 workers that reported LBP at the first questionnaire still have it. These findings suggest that having LBP may become chronic for many workers. LBP prevention is needed for workers with LBP, maybe with programs as return-to-work policy and controlled and gradated activity after injury.

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2019
48 Reads

Working conditions and high emotional exhaustion among hospital nurses

Revista Brasileira de Medicina do Trabalho

Background: Healthcare workers are exposed to many different occupational stressors, some of which are related to their working conditions. While the experience of stress seems to depend on individual perceptions, some characteristics of inpatient units might influence the occurrence of emotional exhaustion among nurses. Objective: The aim of the present study was to identify characteristics of inpatient units which might be associated with high levels of emotional exhaustion among healthcare workers, nurses in this case. Methods: We conducted the present cross-sectional, exploratory and descriptive study with 108 nurses (83.8% female; average age 33 years old) allocated to inpatients units (wards and intensive care) at a university hospital in Portugal. We administered the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) emotional exhaustion subscale and collected the following data relative to the units to which the participants were allocated: 1) mortality rate; 2) number of deceased patients; 3) shortage of nurses compared to national standards; 4) occupancy rate; 5) proportion of elderly patients (>65 years old). Results: We found a positive relationship between high levels of emotional exhaustion among nurses and very high number of deceased patients (p=0.012), high fatality rate (p=0.036) and high proportion of elderly patients (p=0.025). Conclusion: Very high number of deceased patients, high proportion of elderly patients and high fatality rate in inpatients units were associated with high levels of emotional exhaustion among nurses. These findings suggest that characterizing the objective conditions of inpatient units seems to be an important aspect to be considered in psychosocial risk management programs.

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July 2019
50 Reads

Evaluating the genotoxicity of cellulose nanofibrils in a co-culture of human lung epithelial cells and monocyte-derived macrophages.

Toxicol Lett 2018 Jul 18;291:173-183. Epub 2018 Apr 18.

Department of Human Genetics, National Institute of Health Doutor Ricardo Jorge (INSA), Lisbon, Portugal; Center for Toxicogenomics and Human Health (ToxOmics), NOVA Medical School-FCM, UNL, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address:

Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) are manufactured nanofibres that hold impressive expectations in forest, food, pharmaceutical, and biomedical industries. CNF production and applications are leading to an increased human exposure and thereby it is of utmost importance to assess its safety to health. In this study, we screened the cytotoxic, immunotoxic and genotoxic effects of a CNF produced by TEMPO-mediated oxidation of an industrial bleached Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulp on a co-culture of lung epithelial alveolar (A549) cells and monocyte-derived macrophages (THP-1 cells). The results indicated that low CNF concentrations can stimulate A549 cells proliferation, whereas higher concentrations are moderately toxic. Moreover, no proinflammatory cytokine IL-1? was detected in the co-culture medium suggesting no immunotoxicity. Although CNF treatment did not induce sizable levels of DNA damage in A549 cells, it leaded to micronuclei formation at 1.5 and 3??g/cm. These findings suggest that this type of CNF is genotoxic through aneugenic or clastogenic mechanisms. Noteworthy, cell overgrowth and genotoxicity, which are events relevant for cell malignant transformation, were observed at low CNF concentration levels, which are more realistic and relevant for human exposure, e.g., in occupational settings.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2018.04.013DOI Listing
July 2018
261 Reads
3.262 Impact Factor

Conventional and novel "omics"-based approaches to the study of carbon nanotubes pulmonary toxicity.

Environ Mol Mutagen 2018 05 26;59(4):334-362. Epub 2018 Feb 26.

Departamento de Genética Humana, Instituto Nacional de Saúde Doutor Ricardo Jorge (INSA), Lisboa, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/em.22177DOI Listing
May 2018
259 Reads
2.630 Impact Factor

Patient and hospital characteristics that influence incidence of adverse events in acute public hospitals in Portugal: a retrospective cohort study.

Int J Qual Health Care 2018 Mar;30(2):132-137

National School of Public Health, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida Padre Cruz, 1600-540 Lisboa, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzx190DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5890867PMC
March 2018
232 Reads
1.584 Impact Factor

Risk factors for health care-associated infections: From better knowledge to better prevention.

Am J Infect Control 2017 Oct 23;45(10):e103-e107. Epub 2017 May 23.

CISP, National School of Public Health/Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2017.03.036DOI Listing
October 2017
101 Reads
2.206 Impact Factor

Hospital nurses tasks and work-related musculoskeletal disorders symptoms: A detailed analysis.

Work 2015 ;51(3):401-9

Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/WOR-141939DOI Listing
December 2016
239 Reads
5 Citations

Healthcare workers' health: Old, new and emerging occupational hazards

SHO2015: INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE

There is a general feeling in hospitals that a healthcare worker is "immune" to occupational risks in their work. In fact, healthcare workers are trained to deal with some severe diseases and the treatment and relief of suffering of patients are their top priority. Nevertheless, that kind of feeling is different among professional groups: usually, nurses are more worried about their health and safety than doctors and it is understandable that different perception of occupational risks can influence the adoption of safety practices and protection measures. Regardless of their perception, during their activities, healthcare workers can be exposed to many different occupational hazards. They include physical, chemical, biological and psychological ones. Sometimes, some of them can potentiate the others, growing the risk of negative health effects. A good example for that is the exposure to psychological stressors that can affect immunity, influencing the risk of suffering from an infection related with the exposure to some biological hazards, in a complex way (Sacadura-Leite & Sousa-Uva, 2010; 2011). The main risks for healthcare workers in hospitals are being undertaken, sharing our own experience in an Occupational Health Department of central and university hospital.

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2015
5 Reads

Endemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Nurses' risk perceptions and attitudes.

Am J Infect Control 2014 Oct;42(10):1118-20

Programa de Prevenção e Controlo de Infecção e Resistência aos Antimicrobianos, Direcção Geral de Saúde, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2014.07.013DOI Listing
October 2014
323 Reads
2.210 Impact Factor

Estimating the incidence of adverse events in Portuguese hospitals: a contribution to improving quality and patient safety.

BMC Health Serv Res 2014 Jul 18;14:311. Epub 2014 Jul 18.

National School of Public Health, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida Padre Cruz, 1600-540 Lisboa, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6963-14-311DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4114085PMC
July 2014
144 Reads
7 Citations
1.660 Impact Factor

Nurses' working tasks and MSDs back symptoms: results from a national survey.

Work 2012 ;41 Suppl 1:2449-51

National Public Health School, New University of Lisbon, Avenida Padre Cruz, 1600-560 Lisbon, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/WOR-2012-0479-2449DOI Listing
February 2014
287 Reads
2 Citations

Antibody response to the influenza vaccine in healthcare workers.

Vaccine 2012 Jan 4;30(2):436-41. Epub 2011 Nov 4.

Occupational Health Department, Hospital de Santa Maria/CHLN, Av. Prof Egas Moniz, 1649-035 Lisbon, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.10.061DOI Listing
January 2012
345 Reads
1 Citation
3.624 Impact Factor

Stressors and workplaces-perception of stressors by hospital nurses

HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS ERGONOMICS AND PATIENT SAFETY 2011: AN ALLIANCE BETWEEN PROFESSIONALS AND CITIZENS FOR PATIENT SAFETY AND QUALITY OF LIFE

Healthcare workers are as a rule exposed to stressors, some of them very specific of healthcare settings and others that are also common to other workplaces. The aims of the present study were to identify the main stressors for nurses, working in different workplaces, like wards, operating rooms, emergency departments and intensive care units and to characterize how intense stressors are perceived by the same professionals. The study was carried out on 136 healthy nurses, from 1.154 nurses of the selected areas of work in the studied university hospital. We did individual interviews to identify stressors and we applied a Likert scale to classify the intensity of perceived stressors. As in other studies, we identify work overload as the most referred stressor by our sample, working in the different workplaces. Conflicts between professionals are very common, too. By the way, there are some differences in the perception of some stressors probably related with the specific workplace. Therefore, nurses working in wards referred witnessing the suffering and death of patients as an intensive stressor and nurses working in emergency departments referred conflicts between them and patients and their families as an intensive stressor.

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2011
5 Reads

Constructing risk adjustment models for percutaneous coronary intervention: implications for quality assessment.

Rev Port Cardiol 2010 Dec;29(12):1807-28

Registo Nacional de Cardiologia de Intervenção da Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia, Lisboa, Portugal.

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December 2010
28 Reads
1 Citation
0.525 Impact Factor

Risk-adjustment model in health outcomes evaluation: a contribution to strengthen assessment towards quality improvement in interventional cardiology.

Int J Qual Health Care 2008 Oct 11;20(5):324-30. Epub 2008 Jul 11.

School of Health Technologies of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzn029DOI Listing
October 2008
158 Reads
1.584 Impact Factor

[Aircraft cabin air quality: exposure to ozone].

Acta Med Port 2002 Mar-Apr;15(2):143-51

Departamento de Saúde Ocupacional, Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisboa.

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July 2005
1 Read

Top co-authors

Florentino Serranheira
Florentino Serranheira

Universidade NOVA de Lisboa

5
Maria Joao Silva
Maria Joao Silva

Research Institute for Medicines (iMed.ULisboa)

4
Carla Nunes
Carla Nunes

University of Coimbra

3
Elaine Pina
Elaine Pina

Centro de Saúde Penha de França

2
Ana Luisa Pedro
Ana Luisa Pedro

Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central

1
Etelvina Ferreira
Etelvina Ferreira

Nuffield Health-The Manor Hospital

1
Ema S Leite
Ema S Leite

Instituto Universitário de Lisboa

1

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