Publications by authors named "Antonio Mastrostefano"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Reduced systolic myocardial function in children with chronic renal insufficiency.

J Am Soc Nephrol 2007 Feb 10;18(2):593-8. Epub 2007 Jan 10.

Echocardiography Laboratory, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, "Federico II" University Hospital School of Medicine, Ed.1, Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131, Napoli, Italy.

Increased left ventricular (LV) mass in children with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) might be adaptive to sustain myocardial performance in the presence of increased loading conditions. It was hypothesized that in children with CRI, LV systolic function is impaired despite increased LV mass (LVM). Standard echocardiograms were obtained in 130 predialysis children who were aged 3 to 18 yr (59% boys) and had stages II through IV chronic kidney disease and in 130 healthy children of similar age, gender distribution, and body build. Systolic function was assessed by measurement of fractional shortening at the endocardial (eS) and midwall (mS) levels and computation of end-systolic stress (myocardial afterload). The patients with CRI exhibited a 6% lower eS (33.1 +/- 5.5 versus 35.3 +/- 6.1%; P < 0.05) and 10% lower mS (17.8 +/- 3.1 versus 19.7 +/- 2.7%; P < 0.001) than control subjects in the presence of significantly elevated BP, increased LVM, and more concentric LV geometry. Whereas the decreased eS was explained entirely by augmented end-systolic stress, mS remained reduced after correction for myocardial afterload. The prevalence of subclinical systolic dysfunction as defined by impaired mS was more than five-fold higher in patients with CRI compared with control subjects (24.6 versus 4.5%; P < 0.001). Systolic dysfunction was most common (48%) in patients with concentric hypertrophy and associated with lower hemoglobin levels. CRI in children is associated with impaired intrinsic LV contractility, which parallels increased LVM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2006070691DOI Listing
February 2007

Left ventricular geometry in children with mild to moderate chronic renal insufficiency.

J Am Soc Nephrol 2006 Jan 9;17(1):218-26. Epub 2005 Nov 9.

Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Bambino Gesú, Hospital, Rome, Italy.

Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is the most important independent marker of cardiovascular risk in adults with chronic kidney disease. Cardiovascular morbidity seems increased even in children with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI), but the age and stage of CRI when cardiac alterations become manifest are unknown. For assessing the prevalence and factors associated with abnormal LV geometry in children with CRI, echocardiograms, ambulatory BP monitoring, and biochemical profiles were obtained in 156 children aged 3 to 18 yr with stages 2 through 4 chronic kidney disease (GFR 49 +/- 19 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and compared with echocardiograms obtained in 133 healthy children of comparable age and gender. LV mass was indexed to height2.7. Concentric LV remodeling was observed in 10.2%, concentric LVH in 12.1%, and eccentric LVH in 21% of patients. LVH was more common in boys (43.3 versus 19.4%; P < 0.005). Probability of LVH independently increased with male gender (odds ratio [OR] 2.62; P < 0.05) and standardized body mass index (OR 1.56; P = 0.01). Low hemoglobin, low GFR, young age, and high body mass index were independent correlates of LV mass index (0.005 < P < 0.05). LV concentricity (relative wall thickness) was positively associated with serum albumin (P < 0.05). Probability of abnormal LV geometry increased with C-reactive protein >10 mg/dl (OR 26; P < 0.001). In conclusion, substantial cardiac remodeling of both concentric and eccentric type is present at young age and early stages of CRI in children. Prevalence of LVH is related to male gender, anemia, and ponderosity but not to BP. Additional effects of volume status and inflammation on cardiac geometry are also evident.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2005030276DOI Listing
January 2006