Publications by authors named "Antonia Scaramuzzi"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Calcium homeostasis is altered in skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats: cytofluorimetric and gene expression analysis.

Am J Pathol 2014 Oct 30;184(10):2803-15. Epub 2014 Jul 30.

Section of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy-Drug Sciences, University of Bari, Bari, Italy.

Hypertension is often associated with skeletal muscle pathological conditions related to function and metabolism. The mechanisms underlying the development of these pathological conditions remain undefined. Because calcium homeostasis is a biomarker of muscle function, we assessed whether it is altered in hypertensive muscles. We measured resting intracellular calcium and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) by cytofluorimetric technique and determined the expression of SOCE gene machinery by real-time PCR. Hypertension caused a phenotype-dependent dysregulation of calcium homeostasis; the resting intracellular calcium of extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of SHRs were differently altered with respect to the related muscle of normotensive animals. In addition, soleus muscles of SHR showed reduced activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and decreased sarcolemmal calcium permeability at rest and after SOCE activation. Accordingly, we found an alteration of the expression levels of some SOCE components, such as stromal interaction molecule 1, calcium release-activated calcium modulator 1, and transient receptor potential canonical 1. The hypertension-induced alterations of calcium homeostasis in the soleus muscle of SHRs occurred with changes of some functional outcomes as excitability and resting chloride conductance. We provide suitable targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at counterbalancing muscle performance decline in hypertension, and propose the reported calcium-dependent parameters as indexes to predict how the antihypertensive drugs could influence muscle function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajpath.2014.06.020DOI Listing
October 2014

Angiotensin II modulates mouse skeletal muscle resting conductance to chloride and potassium ions and calcium homeostasis via the AT1 receptor and NADPH oxidase.

Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 2014 Oct 30;307(7):C634-47. Epub 2014 Jul 30.

Unit of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy and Drug Sciences, University of Bari "A. Moro," Bari, Italy; and

Angiotensin II (ANG II) plays a role in muscle wasting and remodeling; however, little evidence shows its direct effects on specific muscle functions. We presently investigated the acute in vitro effects of ANG II on resting ionic conductance and calcium homeostasis of mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibers, based on previous findings that in vivo inhibition of ANG II counteracts the impairment of macroscopic ClC-1 chloride channel conductance (gCl) in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. By means of intracellular microelectrode recordings we found that ANG II reduced gCl in the nanomolar range and in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 0.06 μM) meanwhile increasing potassium conductance (gK). Both effects were inhibited by the ANG II receptors type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonist losartan and the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine; no antagonism was observed with the AT2 antagonist PD123,319. The scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) N-acetyl cysteine and the NADPH-oxidase (NOX) inhibitor apocynin also antagonized ANG II effects on resting ionic conductances; the ANG II-dependent gK increase was blocked by iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of calcium-activated potassium channels. ANG II also lowered the threshold for myofiber and muscle contraction. Both ANG II and the AT1 agonist L162,313 increased the intracellular calcium transients, measured by fura-2, with a two-step pattern. These latter effects were not observed in the presence of losartan and of the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 and the in absence of extracellular calcium, disclosing a Gq-mediated calcium entry mechanism. The data show for the first time that the AT1-mediated ANG II pathway, also involving NOX and ROS, directly modulates ion channels and calcium homeostasis in adult myofibers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpcell.00372.2013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4187056PMC
October 2014

In-vivo administration of CLC-K kidney chloride channels inhibitors increases water diuresis in rats: a new drug target for hypertension?

J Hypertens 2012 Jan;30(1):153-67

Section of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacobiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Bari, Bari, Italy.

Objective: The human kidney-specific chloride channels ClC-Ka (rodent ClC-K1) and ClC-Kb (rodent ClC-K2) are important determinants of renal function, participating to urine concentration and blood pressure regulation mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that these chloride channels could represent new drug targets for inducing diuretic and antihypertensive effects.

Methods: To this purpose, the CLC-K blockers benzofuran derivatives MT-189 and RT-93 (10, 50, 100 mg/kg), were acutely administered by gavage in Wistar rats, and pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters determined by functional, bioanalytical, biochemical and molecular biology assays.

Results: Plasma concentration values for MT-189 and RT-93 were indicative of good bioavailability. Both MT-189 and RT-93 dose-dependently increased urine volume without affecting electrolyte balance. A comparable reduction of SBP was observed in rats after MT-189, RT-93 or furosemide administration. Benzofuran derivatives treatment did not affect kidney CLC-K mRNA level or inner medulla osmolality, whereas a significant vasopressin-independent down-regulation of aquaporin water channel type 2 was observed at protein and transcriptional levels. In rats treated with benzofuran derivatives, the observed polyuria was mainly water diuresis; this finding indirectly supports a cross-talk between chloride and water transport in nephron. Moreover, preliminary in-vitro evaluation of the drugs capability to cross the blood-inner ear barrier suggests that these compounds have a limited ability to induce potential auditory side effects.

Conclusion: CLC-K blockers may represent a new class of drugs for the treatment of conditions associated with expanded extracellular volume, with a hopeful high therapeutic potential for hypertensive patients carrying ClC-K gain-of-function polymorphisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0b013e32834d9eb9DOI Listing
January 2012

Potential benefits of taurine in the prevention of skeletal muscle impairment induced by disuse in the hindlimb-unloaded rat.

Amino Acids 2012 Jul 11;43(1):431-45. Epub 2011 Oct 11.

Section of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacobiology, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Via Orabona 4, 70124, Bari, Italy.

Hindlimb unloading (HU) in rats induces severe atrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotype transition in postural slow-twitch muscles, as occurs in human disuse conditions, such as spaceflight or bed rest. In rats, a reduction of soleus muscle weight and a decrease of cross-sectional area (CSA) were observed as signs of atrophy. An increased expression of the fast-isoform of myosin heavy chain (MHC) showed the phenotype transition. In parallel the resting cytosolic calcium concentration (restCa) was decreased and the resting chloride conductance (gCl), which regulates muscle excitability, was increased toward the values of the fast-twitch muscles. Here, we investigated the possible role of taurine, which is known to modulate calcium homeostasis and gCl, in the restoration of muscle impairment due to 14-days-HU. We found elevated taurine content and higher expression of the taurine transporter TauT in the soleus muscle as compared to the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of control rats. Taurine level was reduced in the HU soleus muscle, although, TauT expression was not modified. Taurine oral supplementation (5 g/kg) fully prevented this loss, and preserved resting gCl and restCa together with the slow MHC phenotype. Taurine supplementation did not prevent the HU-induced drop of muscle weight or fiber CSA, but it restored the expression of MURF-1, an atrophy-related gene, suggesting a possible early protective effect of taurine. In conclusion, taurine prevented the HU-induced phenotypic transition of soleus muscle and might attenuate the atrophic process. These findings argue for the beneficial use of taurine in the treatment of disuse-induced muscle dysfunction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00726-011-1099-4DOI Listing
July 2012