Publications by authors named "Antonella D"

3 Publications

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New Nutritional and Therapeutical Strategies of NEC.

Curr Pediatr Rev 2019 ;15(2):92-105

Pediatric Department for the Treatment and Study of abdominal Disease and Abdominal Transplants, ISMETT-UPMC, Palermo, Italy.

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is an acquired severe disease of the digestive system affecting mostly premature babies, possibly fatal and frequently associated to systemic complications. Because of the severity of this condition and the possible long-term consequences on the child's development, many studies have aimed at preventing the occurrence of the primary events at the level of the bowel wall (ischemia and necrosis followed by sepsis) by modifying or manipulating the diet (breast milk versus formula) and/or the feeding pattern (time for initiation after birth, continuous versus bolus feeding, modulation of intake according clinical events). Feeding have been investigated so far in order to prevent NEC. However, currently well-established and shared clinical nutritional practices are not available in preventing NEC. Nutritional and surgical treatments of NEC are instead well defined. In selected cases surgery is a therapeutic option of NEC, requiring sometimes partial intestinal resection responsible for short bowel syndrome. In this paper we will investigate the available options for treating NEC according to the Walsh and Kliegman classification, focusing on feeding practices in managing short bowel syndrome that can complicate NEC. We will also analyze the proposed ways of preventing NEC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573396315666190313164753DOI Listing
March 2020

Antimutagenic and antioxidant activities of some bioflavours from wine.

Food Chem Toxicol 2013 Oct 24;60:141-6. Epub 2013 Jul 24.

Department of Physiology and Pharmacology "V. Erspamer", Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy. Electronic address:

Monoterpenes limonene and its metabolic derivatives, α-terpineol and 1,8-cineol, commonly found as aroma wine components, were studied for their antimutagenicity by the bacterial reverse mutation assay on different strains. Substances were also tested for their antioxidant activity, i.e. radical scavenger, chelation, reduction, and lipid peroxidation inhibition. Limonene and its metabolites, α-terpineol and 1,8-cineol, resulted able to inhibit the chemically-induced mutagenesis, although with a different specificity. The antimutagenicity of limonene has been generally retained by its metabolites and sometimes increased. In particular, α-terpineol exhibited the strongest inhibition, moreover it showed to be a remarkable ferrous ions chelating agent. Limonene and 1,8-cineol were devoid of antioxidant activity. Present results are a starting point in evaluating the potential of α-terpineol as a chemopreventive agent and suggest potential functional dietary benefits of wine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2013.07.042DOI Listing
October 2013

A lipophilic nitric oxide donor and a lipophilic antioxidant compound protect rat heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury if given as hybrid molecule but not as a mixture.

J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 2012 Mar;59(3):241-8

Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, Orbassano, Italy.

Low concentrations of a hydrophilic nitric oxide donor (NOD) are reported to reduce myocardial reperfusion injury only when combined with a lipophilic antioxidant (AOX) to form a hybrid molecule (HYB). Here we tested whether liposoluble NOD requires to be combined with AOX to be protective. Isolated rat hearts underwent 30 minutes of ischemia and 120 minutes of reperfusion. To induce postconditioning, 1 μM solutions of the following liposoluble compounds were given during the first 20 minutes of reperfusion: NOD with weak (w-NOD) or strong NO-releasing potency (s-NOD); weak HYB built up with w-NOD and a per se ineffective AOX lead; strong HYB built up with s-NOD and the same AOX; mixtures of w-NOD plus AOX or s-NOD plus AOX. A significant reduction of infarct size with improved recovery of cardiac function was obtained only with weak HYB. We suggest that w-NOD requires the synergy with a per se ineffective AOX to protect. The synergy is possible only if the 2 moieties enter the cell simultaneously as a hybrid, but not as a mixture. It seems that strong HYB was ineffective because an excessive intracellular NO release produces a large amount of reactive species, as shown from the increased nitrotyrosine production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/FJC.0b013e31823d2dcaDOI Listing
March 2012