Publications by authors named "Antoine Mialot"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Generation of a Transplantable Population of Human iPSC-Derived Retinal Ganglion Cells.

Front Cell Dev Biol 2020 27;8:585675. Epub 2020 Oct 27.

Institut de la Vision, Sorbonne Université, INSERM, CNRS, Paris, France.

Optic neuropathies are a major cause of visual impairment due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. Human induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a powerful tool for studying both human RGC development and RGC-related pathological mechanisms. Because RGC loss can be massive before the diagnosis of visual impairment, cell replacement is one of the most encouraging strategies. The present work describes the generation of functional RGCs from iPSCs based on innovative 3D/2D stepwise differentiation protocol. We demonstrate that targeting the cell surface marker THY1 is an effective strategy to select transplantable RGCs. By generating a fluorescent GFP reporter iPSC line to follow transplanted cells, we provide evidence that THY1-positive RGCs injected into the vitreous of mice with optic neuropathy can survive up to 1 month, intermingled with the host RGC layer. These data support the usefulness of iPSC-derived RGC exploration as a potential future therapeutic strategy for optic nerve regeneration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2020.585675DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7652757PMC
October 2020

Evidence for involvement of Wnt signalling in body polarities, cell proliferation, and the neuro-sensory system in an adult ctenophore.

PLoS One 2013 31;8(12):e84363. Epub 2013 Dec 31.

Systématique, Adaptation, Evolution, Unité Mixte de Recherche (UMR) 7138 CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), Université Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, Paris, France.

Signalling through the Wnt family of secreted proteins originated in a common metazoan ancestor and greatly influenced the evolution of animal body plans. In bilaterians, Wnt signalling plays multiple fundamental roles during embryonic development and in adult tissues, notably in axial patterning, neural development and stem cell regulation. Studies in various cnidarian species have particularly highlighted the evolutionarily conserved role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in specification and patterning of the primary embryonic axis. However in another key non-bilaterian phylum, Ctenophora, Wnts are not involved in early establishment of the body axis during embryogenesis. We analysed the expression in the adult of the ctenophore Pleurobrachia pileus of 11 orthologues of Wnt signalling genes including all ctenophore Wnt ligands and Fz receptors and several members of the intracellular β-catenin pathway machinery. All genes are strongly expressed around the mouth margin at the oral pole, evoking the Wnt oral centre of cnidarians. This observation is consistent with primary axis polarisation by the Wnts being a universal metazoan feature, secondarily lost in ctenophores during early development but retained in the adult. In addition, local expression of Wnt signalling genes was seen in various anatomical structures of the body including in the locomotory comb rows, where their complex deployment suggests control by the Wnts of local comb polarity. Other important contexts of Wnt involvement which probably evolved before the ctenophore/cnidarian/bilaterian split include proliferating stem cells and progenitors irrespective of cell types, and developing as well as differentiated neuro-sensory structures.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0084363PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3877318PMC
September 2014

HCN1 channels in cerebellar Purkinje cells promote late stages of learning and constrain synaptic inhibition.

J Physiol 2013 Nov 2;591(22):5691-709. Epub 2013 Sep 2.

M. F. Nolan: Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh, Hugh Robson Building, Edinburgh EH8 9XD, UK.

Neural computations rely on ion channels that modify neuronal responses to synaptic inputs. While single cell recordings suggest diverse and neurone type-specific computational functions for HCN1 channels, their behavioural roles in any single neurone type are not clear. Using a battery of behavioural assays, including analysis of motor learning in vestibulo-ocular reflex and rotarod tests, we find that deletion of HCN1 channels from cerebellar Purkinje cells selectively impairs late stages of motor learning. Because deletion of HCN1 modifies only a subset of behaviours involving Purkinje cells, we asked whether the channel also has functional specificity at a cellular level. We find that HCN1 channels in cerebellar Purkinje cells reduce the duration of inhibitory synaptic responses but, in the absence of membrane hyperpolarization, do not affect responses to excitatory inputs. Our results indicate that manipulation of subthreshold computation in a single neurone type causes specific modifications to behaviour.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2013.259499DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3853504PMC
November 2013

Oculomotor deficits in aryl hydrocarbon receptor null mouse.

PLoS One 2013 3;8(1):e53520. Epub 2013 Jan 3.

INSERM UMR-S 747, Toxicologie Pharmacologie et Signalisation Cellulaire, Centre universitaire des Saints-Pères, Paris, France ; Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.

The Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor or AhR, a ligand-activated transcription factor, is known to mediate the toxic and carcinogenic effects of various environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Recent studies in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster show that the orthologs of the AhR are expressed exclusively in certain types of neurons and are implicated in the development and the homeostasis of the central nervous system. While physiological roles of the AhR were demonstrated in the mammalian heart, liver and gametogenesis, its ontogenic expression and putative neural functions remain elusive. Here, we report that the constitutive absence of the AhR in adult mice (AhR-/-) leads to abnormal eye movements in the form of a spontaneous pendular horizontal nystagmus. To determine if the nystagmus is of vestibular, visual, or cerebellar origin, gaze stabilizing reflexes, namely vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflexes (VOR and OKR), were investigated. The OKR is less effective in the AhR-/- mice suggesting a deficit in the visuo-motor circuitry, while the VOR is mildly affected. Furthermore, the AhR is expressed in the retinal ganglion cells during the development, however electroretinograms revealed no impairment of retinal cell function. The structure of the cerebellum of the AhR-/- mice is normal which is compatible with the preserved VOR adaptation, a plastic process dependent on cerebellar integrity. Finally, intoxication with TCDD of control adults did not lead to any abnormality of the oculomotor control. These results demonstrate that the absence of the AhR leads to acquired central nervous system deficits in the adults. Given the many common features between both AhR mouse and human infantile nystagmus syndromes, the AhR-/- mice might give insights into the developmental mechanisms which lead to congenital eye disorders.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0053520PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3536739PMC
August 2013