Publications by authors named "Anthony S Dick"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Individual Differences in Germ Spreading Behaviors Among Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: The Role of Executive Functioning.

J Pediatr Psychol 2022 Jun 30. Epub 2022 Jun 30.

Department of Psychology, Center for Children and Families, Florida International University, USA.

Objective: Infectious diseases, such as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), are commonly transmitted by respiratory droplets and contact with contaminated surfaces. Individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to be infected with COVID-19 and experience more hospitalizations than individuals without ADHD. The current study investigated the role of ADHD symptomatology and executive functioning (EF) in germ spreading behavior frequency among young children with and without ADHD and parenting responses to these behaviors.

Methods: Participants included 53 children diagnosed with ADHD and 47 typically developing (TD) children between the ages of 4-5 years (76% male; Mage = 4.62; 86% Hispanic/Latinx). Parents and teachers reported on children's ADHD symptomatology and children completed three EF tasks. Germ spreading behavior frequency (direct contact of hand to face and toy in mouth) and parenting responses (verbal and nonverbal behaviors) were observed during a 5-min parent-child play situation.

Results: Negative binomial regression analyses indicated that both ADHD diagnostic status and poor metacognition predicted both higher rates of toy to mouth (β = 1.94, p < .001; β = 0.03, p = .004) and face touching frequency (β = 0.60, p = .03; β = 0.03, p = .004), respectively. Additionally, poor attention and worse cognitive flexibility only predicted higher rates of toy to mouth frequency (β = 0.09, p < .001; β = -0.04, p = .001), respectively.

Conclusions: Young children with ADHD are at high risk for spreading germs via putting toys in their mouth and touching their face. Particularly, high levels of inattention and poor EF appear to be associated with higher rates of germ spreading behaviors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsac056DOI Listing
June 2022

Risky decision-making strategies mediate the relationship between amygdala activity and real-world financial savings among individuals from lower income households: A pilot study.

Behav Brain Res 2022 06 3;428:113867. Epub 2022 Apr 3.

Department of Psychology, Florida International University, Miami, FL, United States. Electronic address:

Lower financial savings among individuals experiencing adverse social determinants of health (SDoH) increases vulnerabilities during times of crisis. SDoH including low socioeconomic status (low-SES) influence cognitive abilities as well as health and life outcomes that may perpetuate poverty and disparities. Despite evidence suggesting a role for financial growth in minimizing SDoH-related disparities and vulnerabilities, neurobiological mechanisms linked with financial behavior remain to be elucidated. As such, we examined the relationships between brain activity during decision-making (DM), laboratory-based task performance, and money savings behavior. Participants (N = 24, 14 females) from low-SES households (income<$20,000/year) underwent fMRI scanning while performing the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), a DM paradigm probing risky- and strategic-DM processes. Participants also completed self-report instruments characterizing relevant personality characteristics and then engaged in a community outreach financial program where amount of money saved was tracked over a 6-month period. Regarding BART-related brain activity, we observed expected activity in regions implicated in reward and emotional processing including the amygdala. Regarding brain-behavior relationships, we found that laboratory-based BART performance mediated the impact of amygdala activity on real-world behavior. That is, elevated amygdala activity was linked with BART strategic-DM which, in turn, was linked with more money saved after 6 months. In exploratory analyses, this mediation was moderated by emotion-related personality characteristics such that, only individuals reporting lower alexithymia demonstrated a relationship between amygdala activity and savings. These outcomes suggest that DM-related amygdala activity and/or emotion-related personality characteristics may provide utility as an endophenotypic marker of individual's financial savings behavior.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2022.113867DOI Listing
June 2022

How much and what: Using a buffet to determine self-regulation of food intake among young school-age children.

Physiol Behav 2022 05 16;249:113745. Epub 2022 Feb 16.

Florida International University, Department of Psychology, Miami, FL United States.

Energy compensation indices are commonly used to examine self-regulation of food intake in children. However, previous studies failed to consider children's ability to self-regulate under complete autonomy. This study examined self-regulation of food intake among young children and the effect of calorie manipulation on food/nutrient intake using an unlimited lunch buffet paradigm. Participants were 66 children (M = 6.14, SD = 1.15 years; 68.2% male; 89.4% Latinx; 59.1% overweight/obese [OV/OB]). Children participated in a crossover research trial, one week apart. Participants consumed 2 different types of preloads followed by an ad-libitum lunch during each trial. A compensation index (COMPX) was calculated to identify the level of self-regulation in food intake. Food/nutrient intake was compared between both sessions. Results indicated OV/OB children showed poorer self-regulation compared to healthy weight children (t = 2.19, p = 0.032; Hedges' g = 0.55). There were significant differences in food intake/selection between OV/OB and healthy weight groups. OV/OB children consumed a higher amount of calorie, fat, and cholesterol after the high energy preload compared to healthy weight children (d's range: 0.31-0.48). Our findings support differences between the amount of self-regulation between normal and OV/OB children as well as the items they select in order to compensate.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2022.113745DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9042651PMC
May 2022

The Pandemic's Toll on Young Adolescents: Prevention and Intervention Targets to Preserve Their Mental Health.

J Adolesc Health 2022 Mar 26;70(3):387-395. Epub 2022 Jan 26.

Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, California. Electronic address:

Purpose: Adolescence is characterized by dramatic physical, social, and emotional changes, making teens particularly vulnerable to the mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. This longitudinal study identifies young adolescents who are most vulnerable to the psychological toll of the pandemic and provides insights to inform strategies to help adolescents cope better in times of crisis.

Methods: A data-driven approach was applied to a longitudinal, demographically diverse cohort of more than 3,000 young adolescents (11-14 years) participating in the ongoing Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study in the United States, including multiple prepandemic visits and three assessments during the COVID-19 pandemic (May-August 2020). We fitted machine learning models and provided a comprehensive list of predictors of psychological distress in individuals.

Results: Positive affect, stress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were accurately detected with our classifiers. Female sex and prepandemic internalizing symptoms and sleep problems were strong predictors of psychological distress. Parent- and youth-reported pandemic-related psychosocial factors, including poorer quality and functioning of family relationships, more screen time, and witnessing discrimination in relation to the pandemic further predicted youth distress. However, better social support, regular physical activities, coping strategies, and healthy behaviors predicted better emotional well-being.

Discussion: Findings highlight the importance of social connectedness and healthy behaviors, such as sleep and physical activity, as buffering factors against the deleterious effects of the pandemic on adolescents' mental health. They also point to the need for greater attention toward coping strategies that help the most vulnerable adolescents, particularly girls and those with prepandemic psychological problems.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2021.11.023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8789404PMC
March 2022

Longitudinal Impact of Childhood Adversity on Early Adolescent Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the ABCD Study Cohort: Does Race or Ethnicity Moderate Findings?

Biol Psychiatry Glob Open Sci 2021 Dec 29;1(4):324-335. Epub 2021 Sep 29.

Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, mental health among youth has been negatively affected. Youth with a history of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), as well as youth from minoritized racial-ethnic backgrounds, may be especially vulnerable to experiencing COVID-19-related distress. The aims of this study are to examine whether exposure to pre-pandemic ACEs predicts mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic in youth and whether racial-ethnic background moderates these effects.

Methods: From May to August 2020, 7983 youths (mean age, 12.5 years; range, 10.6-14.6 years) in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study completed at least one of three online surveys measuring the impact of the pandemic on their mental health. Data were evaluated in relation to youths' pre-pandemic mental health and ACEs.

Results: Pre-pandemic ACE history significantly predicted poorer mental health across all outcomes and greater COVID-19-related stress and impact of fears on well-being. Youths reported improved mental health during the pandemic (from May to August 2020). While reporting similar levels of mental health, youths from minoritized racial-ethnic backgrounds had elevated COVID-19-related worry, stress, and impact on well-being. Race and ethnicity generally did not moderate ACE effects. Older youths, girls, and those with greater pre-pandemic internalizing symptoms also reported greater mental health symptoms.

Conclusions: Youths who experienced greater childhood adversity reported greater negative affect and COVID-19-related distress during the pandemic. Although they reported generally better mood, Asian American, Black, and multiracial youths reported greater COVID-19-related distress and experienced COVID-19-related discrimination compared with non-Hispanic White youths, highlighting potential health disparities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpsgos.2021.08.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8479935PMC
December 2021

Neural response to monetary loss among youth with disruptive behavior disorders and callous-unemotional traits in the ABCD study.

Neuroimage Clin 2021 1;32:102810. Epub 2021 Sep 1.

Department of Psychology, Center for Children and Families, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA.

Etiological models highlight reduced punishment sensitivity as a core risk factor for disruptive behavior disorders (DBD) and callous-unemotional (CU) traits. The current study examined neural sensitivity to the anticipation and receipt of loss, one key aspect of punishment sensitivity, among youth with DBD, comparing those with and without CU traits. Data were obtained from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study (N = 11,874; Mage = 9.51; 48% female). Loss-related fMRI activity during the monetary incentive delay task was examined across 16 empirically-derived a priori brain regions (e.g., striatum, amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex) and compared across the following groups: (1) typically developing (n = 693); (2) DBD (n = 995), subdivided into those (3) with CU traits (DBD + CU, n = 198), and (4) without CU traits (DBD-only, n = 276). Latent variable modeling was also employed to examine network-level activity. There were no significant between-group differences in brain activity to loss anticipation or receipt. Null findings were confirmed with and without covariates, using alternative grouping approaches, and in dimensional models. Network-level analyses also demonstrated comparable activity across groups during loss anticipation and receipt. Findings suggest that differences in punishment sensitivity among youth with DBD are unrelated to loss anticipation or receipt. More precise characterizations of other aspects punishment sensitivity are needed to understand risk for DBD and CU traits.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2021.102810DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8445885PMC
January 2022

Is there any incremental benefit to conducting neuroimaging and neurocognitive assessments in the diagnosis of ADHD in young children? A machine learning investigation.

Dev Cogn Neurosci 2021 06 21;49:100966. Epub 2021 May 21.

Florida International University, United States.

Given the negative trajectories of early behavior problems associated with ADHD, early diagnosis is considered critical to enable intervention and treatment. To this end, the current investigation employed machine learning to evaluate the relative predictive value of parent/teacher ratings, behavioral and neural measures of executive function (EF) in predicting ADHD in a sample consisting of 162 young children (ages 4-7, mean age 5.55, 82.6 % Hispanic/Latino). Among the target measures, teacher ratings of EF were the most predictive of ADHD. While a more extensive evaluation of neural measures, such as diffusion-weighted imaging, may provide more information as they relate to the underlying cognitive deficits associated with ADHD, the current study indicates that measures of cortical anatomy obtained in research studies, as well cognitive measures of EF often obtained in routine assessments, have little incremental value in differentiating typically developing children from those diagnosed with ADHD. It is important to note that the overlap between some of the EF questions in the BRIEF, and the ADHD symptoms could be enhancing this effect. Thus, future research evaluating the importance of such measures in predicting children's functional impairment in academic and social areas would provide additional insight into their contributing role in ADHD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2021.100966DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8167232PMC
June 2021

Correspondence Between Perceived Pubertal Development and Hormone Levels in 9-10 Year-Olds From the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study.

Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) 2020 18;11:549928. Epub 2021 Feb 18.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States.

Aim: To examine individual variability between perceived physical features and hormones of pubertal maturation in 9-10-year-old children as a function of sociodemographic characteristics.

Methods: Cross-sectional metrics of puberty were utilized from the baseline assessment of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study-a multi-site sample of 9-10 year-olds (n = 11,875)-and included perceived physical features the pubertal development scale (PDS) and child salivary hormone levels (dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone in all, and estradiol in females). Multi-level models examined the relationships among sociodemographic measures, physical features, and hormone levels. A group factor analysis (GFA) was implemented to extract latent variables of pubertal maturation that integrated both measures of perceived physical features and hormone levels.

Results: PDS summary scores indicated more males (70%) than females (31%) were prepubertal. Perceived physical features and hormone levels were significantly associated with child's weight status and income, such that more mature scores were observed among children that were overweight/obese or from households with low-income. Results from the GFA identified two latent factors that described individual differences in pubertal maturation among both females and males, with factor 1 driven by higher hormone levels, and factor 2 driven by perceived physical maturation. The correspondence between latent factor 1 scores (hormones) and latent factor 2 scores (perceived physical maturation) revealed synchronous and asynchronous relationships between hormones and concomitant physical features in this large young adolescent sample.

Conclusions: Sociodemographic measures were associated with both objective hormone and self-report physical measures of pubertal maturation in a large, diverse sample of 9-10 year-olds. The latent variables of pubertal maturation described a complex interplay between perceived physical changes and hormone levels that hallmark sexual maturation, which future studies can examine in relation to trajectories of brain maturation, risk/resilience to substance use, and other mental health outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2020.549928DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7930488PMC
May 2021

Reward Processing in Children With Disruptive Behavior Disorders and Callous-Unemotional Traits in the ABCD Study.

Am J Psychiatry 2021 04 31;178(4):333-342. Epub 2020 Jul 31.

Department of Psychology, Center for Children and Families (Hawes, Dick, Sutherland, Gonzalez) and Department of Physics (Riedel, Tobia, Laird), Florida International University, Miami; Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (Waller); Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh (Byrd); and Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (Bjork, Thomson).

Objective: Disrupted reward processing is implicated in the etiology of disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) and callous-unemotional traits. However, neuroimaging investigations of reward processing underlying these phenotypes remain sparse. The authors examined neural sensitivity in response to reward anticipation and receipt among youths with DBDs, with and without callous-unemotional traits.

Methods: Data were obtained from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development Study (mean age=9.51 years [SD=0.50]; 49% female). Reward-related activation during the monetary incentive delay task was examined across 16 brain regions, including the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), nucleus accumbens (NAcc), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Latent variable modeling was used to examine network-level coactivation. The following diagnostic groups were compared: typically developing youths (N=693) and youths with DBDs (N=995), subdivided into those with callous-unemotional traits (DBD+CU, N=198) and without callous-unemotional traits (DBD only, N=276).

Results: During reward anticipation, youths in the overall DBD group (with and without callous-unemotional traits) showed decreased dorsal ACC activation compared with typically developing youths. The DBD-only group exhibited reduced ventral and dorsal striatal activity compared with the DBD+CU and typically developing groups. During reward receipt, youths with DBDs showed increased cortical (e.g., OFC) and subcortical (e.g., NAcc) regional activation compared with typically developing youths. The DBD+CU group demonstrated greater activation in several regions compared with those in the typically developing (e.g., amygdala) and DBD-only (e.g., dorsal ACC) groups. At the network level, the DBD-only group showed reduced anticipatory reward activation compared with the typically developing and DBD+CU groups, whereas youths in the DBD+CU group showed increased activation during reward receipt compared with those in the typically developing group.

Conclusions: These findings advance our understanding of unique neuroetiologic pathways to DBDs and callous-unemotional traits.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2020.19101092DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7855017PMC
April 2021

Disruptive Behavior Problems, Callous-Unemotional Traits, and Regional Gray Matter Volume in the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development Study.

Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging 2020 05 22;5(5):481-489. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

Department of Psychology, Florida International University, Miami, Florida.

Background: Neurobiological differences linked to socioemotional and cognitive processing are well documented in youths with disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs), especially youths with callous-unemotional (CU) traits. The current study expanded this literature by examining gray matter volume (GMV) differences among youths with DBD with CU traits (DBDCU+), youths with DBD without CU traits (DBD-only), and youths that were typically developing (TD).

Methods: Data were from the first full sample release of the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development Study (mean age = 9.49 years; 49% female). We tested whether the GMVs of 11 regions of interest selected a priori differentiated between our 3 groups: DBDCU+ (n = 288), DBD-only (n = 362), and TD (n = 915). Models accounted for demographic confounders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and intracranial volume. We examined two potential moderators of the relationship between GMVs and group membership: sex and clinically significant anxiety (i.e., primary vs. secondary CU traits subtype).

Results: Youths in the DBDCU+ group had lower right amygdala GMV, and youths in the DBD-only group had lower bilateral amygdala GMV relative to TD youths. Youths in the DBDCU+ group had lower bilateral hippocampal GMV, and youths in the DBD-only group had lower left hippocampal GMV relative to TD youths. Youths in the DBDCU+ group evidenced lower left insula GMV relative to TD youths. Finally, youths in the DBD-only group had lower left superior frontal gyrus and lower right caudal anterior cingulate cortex GMVs relative to TD youths. There was no moderation of associations between GMV and group membership by sex.

Conclusions: Our findings implicate structural aberrations in both the amygdala and hippocampus in the etiology of DBDs, with minimal evidence for differences based on the presence or absence of CU traits.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpsc.2020.01.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7214118PMC
May 2020

Strategy selection versus flexibility: Using eye-trackers to investigate strategy use during mental rotation.

J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 2019 Feb 28;45(2):232-245. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Department of Psychology.

Spatial researchers have been arguing over the optimum cognitive strategy for spatial problem-solving for several decades. The current article aims to shift this debate from strategy dichotomies to strategy flexibility-a cognitive process, which although alluded to in spatial research, presents practical methodological challenges to empirical testing. In the current study, participants' eye movements were tracked during a mental rotation task (MRT) using the Tobii ×60 eye-tracker. Results of a latent profile analysis, combining different eye movement parameters, indicated two distinct eye-patterns-fixating and switching patterns. The switching eye-pattern was associated with high mental rotation performance. There were no sex differences in eye-patterns. To investigate strategy flexibility, we used a novel application of the changepoint detection algorithm on eye movement data. Strategy flexibility significantly predicted mental rotation performance. Male participants demonstrated higher strategy flexibility than did female participants. Our findings highlight the importance of strategy flexibility in spatial thinking and have implications for designing spatial training techniques. The novel approaches to analyzing eye movement data in the current paper can be extended to research beyond the spatial domain. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xlm0000574DOI Listing
February 2019

The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study: Imaging acquisition across 21 sites.

Dev Cogn Neurosci 2018 08 14;32:43-54. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

Departments of Psychiatry and Radiology, University of Vermont, United States.

The ABCD study is recruiting and following the brain development and health of over 10,000 9-10 year olds through adolescence. The imaging component of the study was developed by the ABCD Data Analysis and Informatics Center (DAIC) and the ABCD Imaging Acquisition Workgroup. Imaging methods and assessments were selected, optimized and harmonized across all 21 sites to measure brain structure and function relevant to adolescent development and addiction. This article provides an overview of the imaging procedures of the ABCD study, the basis for their selection and preliminary quality assurance and results that provide evidence for the feasibility and age-appropriateness of procedures and generalizability of findings to the existent literature.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2018.03.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5999559PMC
August 2018

Meta-analytic connectivity and behavioral parcellation of the human cerebellum.

Neuroimage 2015 Aug 19;117:327-42. Epub 2015 May 19.

Department of Physics, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA. Electronic address:

The cerebellum historically has been thought to mediate motor and sensory signals between the body and cerebral cortex, yet cerebellar lesions are also associated with altered cognitive behavioral performance. Neuroimaging evidence indicates that the cerebellum contributes to a wide range of cognitive, perceptual, and motor functions. Here, we used the BrainMap database to investigate whole-brainco-activation patterns between cerebellar structures and regions of the cerebral cortex, as well as associations with behavioral tasks. Hierarchical clustering was performed to meta-analytically identify cerebellar structures with similar cortical co-activation, and independently, with similar correlations to specific behavioral tasks. Strong correspondences were observed in these separate but parallel analyses of meta-analytic connectivity and behavioral metadata. We recovered differential zones of cerebellar co-activation that are reflected across the literature. Furthermore, the behaviors and tasks associated with the different cerebellar zones provide insight into the specialized function of the cerebellum, relating to high-order cognition, emotion, perception, interoception, and action. Taken together, these task-basedmeta-analytic results implicate distinct zones of the cerebellum as critically involved in the monitoring and mediation of psychological responses to internal and external stimuli.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.05.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4512917PMC
August 2015

Functional and structural aging of the speech sensorimotor neural system: functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence.

Neurobiol Aging 2013 Aug 21;34(8):1935-51. Epub 2013 Mar 21.

Centre de Recherche de l'Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Québec, Department of Rehabilitation, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada.

The ability to perceive and produce speech undergoes important changes in late adulthood. The goal of the present study was to characterize functional and structural age-related differences in the cortical network that support speech perception and production, using magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the relationship between functional and structural age-related changes occurring in this network. We asked young and older adults to observe videos of a speaker producing single words (perception), and to observe and repeat the words produced (production). Results show a widespread bilateral network of brain activation for Perception and Production that was not correlated with age. In addition, several regions did show age-related change (auditory cortex, planum temporale, superior temporal sulcus, premotor cortices, SMA-proper). Examination of the relationship between brain signal and regional and global gray matter volume and cortical thickness revealed a complex set of relationships between structure and function, with some regions showing a relationship between structure and function and some not. The present results provide novel findings about the neurobiology of aging and verbal communication.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2013.02.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3651767PMC
August 2013
-->