Publications by authors named "Anthony Guzman"

35 Publications

Controllability and state feedback control of a cardiac ionic cell model.

Comput Biol Med 2021 Dec 30;139:104909. Epub 2021 Sep 30.

School of Mathematical Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, 14623, USA. Electronic address:

A phenomenon called alternans, which is a beat-to-beat alternation in action potential (AP) duration, sometimes precedes fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Alternans-suppressing electrical stimulus protocols are often represented as perturbations to the dynamics of membrane potential or AP duration variables in nonlinear models of cardiac tissue. Controllability analysis has occasionally been applied to cardiac AP models to determine whether different control or perturbation strategies are capable of suppressing alternans or other unwanted behavior. Since almost all previous cardiac controllability studies have focused on low-dimensional models, we conducted the present study to assess controllability of a higher-dimensional model, specifically the Luo Rudy dynamic (LRd) model of a cardiac ventricular myocyte. Higher-dimensional models are of interest because they provide information on the influence of a wider range of measurable quantities, including ionic concentrations, on controllability. After computing modal controllability measures, we found that larger eigenvalues of a linearized LRd model were on average more strongly controllable through perturbations to calcium-ion concentrations compared with perturbations to other variables. When only membrane potential was adjusted, the best time to apply perturbations (in the sense of maximizing controllability of the largest alternans eigenvalue) was near the AP peak time for shorter cycle lengths. Controllability results were found to be similar for both the default model parameters and for an alternans-promoting parameter set. Additionally, we developed several alternans-suppressing state feedback controllers that were tested in simulations. For the scenarios examined, our controllability measures correctly predicted which strategies and perturbation timings would lead to better feedback controller performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compbiomed.2021.104909DOI Listing
December 2021

Comparison of Survival Outcomes With/Without Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Desmoplastic Melanoma.

Dermatol Surg 2021 Oct;47(10):1333-1336

Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas.

Background: Desmoplastic melanoma (DM) is a rare variant of cutaneous melanoma with a high rate of local recurrence. Recent studies have indicated a potential benefit in local control with the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT).

Objective: This study sought to evaluate the outcomes of adjuvant RT for patients with DM.

Materials And Methods: The National Cancer Database was queried (2004-2015) for patients with newly diagnosed, nonmetastatic DM. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the adjuvant therapy they received: RT or observation. Statistics included multivariable logistic regression to determine factors predictive of receiving adjuvant RT, Kaplan-Meier analysis to evaluate overall survival (OS), and Cox proportional hazards modeling to determine variables associated with OS.

Results: There was no difference in median OS between patients treated with RT when compared with patients observed (111.4 months vs 133.9 months, p = .1312). On multivariable analysis, older age, T stage ≥2, N stage ≥1, and no receipt of immunotherapy were associated with worse OS.

Conclusion: In this large study evaluating efficacy of adjuvant RT in DM, no overall survival benefit was observed among patients receiving adjuvant RT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DSS.0000000000003177DOI Listing
October 2021

Immunohistochemistry Utilization in Medicare Beneficiaries by Mohs Surgeons From 2012-2017.

J Drugs Dermatol 2021 Aug;20(8):905-906

Based on surveys by Robinson1 in 2001 and Trimble and Cherpeli2 in 2013, Immunohistochemistry (IHC) utilization in Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) has been rising. Although these surveys provided important subjective data regarding IHC use in MMS, there is a paucity of objective data describing its current utilization patterns. The objective of this study is to characterize IHC utilization during MMS by Mohs surgeons in the treatment of Medicare beneficiaries from 2012-2017.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.36849/JDD.5909DOI Listing
August 2021

Spectrum of PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitor cutaneous adverse events in skin of color: a retrospective, single-institutional study in an urban community.

Acta Oncol 2021 Apr 1;60(4):559-563. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Dermatology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0284186X.2021.1878387DOI Listing
April 2021

Geographic Analysis of Search Engine Utilization Trends Related to Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer and Mohs Micrographic Surgery, 2015 to 2020: Implications for Public Interest and Awareness in the United States.

Dermatol Surg 2021 07;47(7):1002-1004

All authors are affiliated with the Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DSS.0000000000002936DOI Listing
July 2021

Unilateral perniosis (chilblains) following hip arthroplasty.

JAAD Case Rep 2021 Jan 1;7:141-142. Epub 2020 Dec 1.

Division of Dermatopathology, Department of Pathology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2020.11.027DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7779860PMC
January 2021

Drug-induced cutaneous vasculitis and anticoagulant-related cutaneous adverse reactions: insights in pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and treatment.

Clin Dermatol 2020 Nov - Dec;38(6):613-628. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.

Drug-induced vasculitis and anticoagulant-related skin reactions are commonly encountered in the inpatient and outpatient settings. The spectrum of clinical presentation is broad and ranges from focal, skin-limited disease, to more extensive cutaneous and soft tissue necrosis, to potentially fatal systemic involvement. The prompt recognition of these adverse events can have a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality. We highlight the key features of the clinical presentation with an emphasis on primary lesion morphology, distribution, and epidemiology of purpuric drug reactions. The proposed pathophysiology, histologic findings, and therapeutic interventions of these potentially life-threatening diseases are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2020.06.015DOI Listing
January 2021

Telogen effluvium: a sequela of COVID-19.

Int J Dermatol 2021 Jan 23;60(1):122-124. Epub 2020 Nov 23.

Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.15313DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7753411PMC
January 2021

Benzodiazepine Utilization in Medicare Beneficiaries by Mohs Surgeons and Dermatologists From 2013 to 2017.

Dermatol Surg 2021 06;47(6):832-834

Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DSS.0000000000002839DOI Listing
June 2021

Observability analysis and state observer design for a cardiac ionic cell model.

Comput Biol Med 2020 10 8;125:103910. Epub 2020 Jul 8.

School of Mathematical Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, 14623, USA. Electronic address:

To gain insights into cardiac arrhythmias, researchers have developed and employed various measurement techniques, such as electrocardiography, optical mapping, and patch clamping. However, there are no measurement methods that allow simultaneous recording of all cellular quantities, including intracellular ionic concentrations and gating states, that may play an important role in arrhythmia formation. To help address this shortcoming, we applied observability analysis, a method from control theory, to the Luo-Rudy dynamic (LRd) model of a cardiac ventricular myocyte. After linearizing the time-integrated LRd model about selected periodic orbits, we computed the observability properties of the model to determine whether past system states could be reconstructed from different hypothetical sets of measurements. Under the simplifying assumption that only one dynamical variable could be measured periodically, we found that intracellular potassium concentration generally yielded the largest observability values and thus contained the most information about the dominant modes of the system. The impacts on observability of measurement timings, inter-stimulus interval length, and an alternans-promoting parameter shift were also studied. Pole-placement state observer algorithms were designed and tested in simulations for several scenarios, and we found that it is possible to infer unmeasured variables from potassium-concentration measurements, and to an extent from membrane-potential measurements, both for longer periods that represent normal rhythms and shorter periods associated with tachyarrhythmias. Our results could lead to improved data assimilation algorithms that combine model predictions with measurements to estimate quantities that are difficult or impossible to measure during in vitro experiments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compbiomed.2020.103910DOI Listing
October 2020

The volume, scope, and geographic distribution of primary care clinicians performing dermatologic procedures.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2021 Nov 3;85(5):1302-1304. Epub 2020 Sep 3.

Department of Dermatology, Penn State Hershey Medical Cancer, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.08.110DOI Listing
November 2021

Relationship Between Scholarly Activity and Postgraduate Career Choice: A Bibliometric Analysis of the 2017 Diplomates of the American Board of Dermatology.

J Grad Med Educ 2020 Aug;12(4):455-460

Background: Scholarly productivity is an assessment metric for dermatology residents and faculty. How the bibliometric h-index, a publicly available metric that incorporates the quantity and quality of publications, relates to early career choices of dermatologists has not been investigated.

Objective: We determined the h-indices of the 2017 diplomates of the American Board of Dermatology to ascertain its association with career choice.

Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed using the published list of the 2017 diplomates. Gender and PhD status were compiled. The Scopus database was queried for publications and h-indices. The primary outcome was the pursuit of an academic position, nonacademic position, or fellowship after board certification.

Results: Among 475 (96%) diplomates, the median (range) h-index was 2 (0-14). Those with MD and PhD degrees had greater h-indices (6.4 ± 3.1 vs. 2.3 ± 2.3, < .05). There was a difference ( < .05) in h-index between diplomates pursuing an academic position (3.6 ± 3.1), non-procedural fellowship (3.3 ± 3.1), procedural fellowship (2.5 ± 2.0), and non-academic position (2.1 ± 2.1).

Conclusions: The h-index quantifies academic productivity and may predict early career choices in dermatology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4300/JGME-D-19-00651.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7450752PMC
August 2020

Acute inflammatory Demodex-induced pustulosis in an immunocompetent patient related to topical steroid use.

Pediatr Dermatol 2020 Sep 29;37(5):985-986. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

Demodex spp. mites are a common colonizer of sebaceous adult skin. Though usually clinically insignificant, demodicosis may be associated with a wide spectrum of skin diseases in immunocompetent hosts, such as erythematotelangiectatic and papulopustular rosacea, Demodex folliculorum, and blepharitis. We present a case of a healthy 9-year-old boy with an exuberant, inflammatory, Demodex-associated pustular eruption of the face, induced by the use of a high-potency topical steroid and successfully treated with oral ivermectin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pde.14315DOI Listing
September 2020

Optimizing education for dermatology residents during the COVID-19 pandemic.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 10 16;83(4):e319-e320. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.07.029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7363594PMC
October 2020

Comparative analysis of prescribing patterns of tetracycline class antibiotics and spironolactone between advanced practice providers and physicians in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2021 Apr 17;84(4):1119-1121. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.06.044DOI Listing
April 2021

Analysis of dermatology-related search engine trends during the COVID-19 pandemic: Implications for patient demand for outpatient services and telehealth.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 09 4;83(3):963-965. Epub 2020 Jun 4.

Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.05.147DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7271842PMC
September 2020

Persistent eyelid ulceration in an immunocompromised host: A cutaneous sign with the potential for early diagnosis and intervention in disseminated cryptococcosis.

JAAD Case Rep 2020 May 29;6(5):388-389. Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2020.03.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7200202PMC
May 2020

Comment on "Dermatologists in social media: A study on top influencers, posts, and user engagement".

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 Apr 20. Epub 2020 Apr 20.

Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.03.118DOI Listing
April 2020

Evaluation of YouTube as an educational resource for treatment options of common dermatologic conditions.

Int J Dermatol 2020 Mar 20;59(3):e65-e67. Epub 2019 Oct 20.

Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.14693DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7007825PMC
March 2020

Intrasubunit V-Y Muscle Sling Myocutaneous Island Advancement Flap for Small Defects Isolated to the Nasal Ala.

Dermatol Surg 2020 04;46(4):546-553

Department of Dermatology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Background: The V-Y island advancement flap is a useful reconstruction technique for nasal alar defects, but flap mobility is limited by the insertion of the muscles of facial expression into the dermis of the alae.

Objective: To describe a V-Y muscle sling myocutaneous island advancement flap (SMIAF) for improved mobility and intrasubunit reconstruction of alar defects.

Materials And Methods: A retrospective review of patient records and preoperative and postoperative photographs was performed on all patients with alar defects repaired with the SMIAF between April 2008 and October 2017. Patients and physicians rated aesthetic outcomes with the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS).

Results: A total of 18 nasal alar defects were repaired with the SMIAF after Mohs micrographic surgery. All defects were located on the anterior two-thirds of the alar lobule and had a mean surface area of 0.42 ± 0.19 cm. No patients experienced flap necrosis. Patients and 3 independent dermatologic surgeons rated favorable aesthetic outcomes.

Conclusion: The SMIAF is a reliable reconstruction option with good aesthetic outcomes for small defects on the anterior two-thirds of the nasal ala.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DSS.0000000000002087DOI Listing
April 2020

Predictors of 30-day readmission in Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: A cross-sectional database study.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 Feb 19;82(2):303-310. Epub 2019 Sep 19.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio.

Background: The predictors of readmission in Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) have not been characterized.

Objective: To determine the variables predictive of 30-day readmission after SJS/TEN hospitalization.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of the 2010-2014 Nationwide Readmissions Database. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate associations of patient demographics, comorbidities, and hospital characteristics with readmission. Aggregate and per-readmission costs were calculated.

Results: There were 8837 index admissions with SJS/TEN reported; of these, 910 (10.3%) were readmitted, with diagnoses including systemic infection (22.0%), SJS/TEN (20.6%), and cutaneous infection (9.1%). Associated characteristics included age 45 to 64 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-2.49), Medicaid insurance (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.48-2.27), and nonmetropolitan hospital admission (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.31-2.13). Associated comorbidities included HIV/AIDS (OR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.63-3.75), collagen vascular disease (OR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.88-3.00), and metastatic cancer (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.35-3.46). The median per-readmission cost was $10,019 (interquartile range, $4,788-$16,485).

Limitations: The Nationwide Readmissions Database lacks the ability to track the same patient across calendar years. The diagnostic code lacks specificity for hospitalizations <3 days.

Conclusions: Thirty-day readmissions after SJS/TEN hospitalizations are common. Dedicated efforts to identify at-risk patients may improve peridischarge continuity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2019.09.017DOI Listing
February 2020

Imaging Corrosion at the Metal-Paint Interface Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

J Vis Exp 2019 05 6(147). Epub 2019 May 6.

Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory;

Corrosion developed at the paint and aluminum (Al) metal-paint interface of an aluminum alloy is analyzed using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), illustrating that SIMS is a suitable technique to study the chemical distribution at a metal-paint interface. The painted Al alloy coupons are immersed in a salt solution or exposed to air only. SIMS provides chemical mapping and 2D molecular imaging of the interface, allowing direct visualization of the morphology of the corrosion products formed at the metal-paint interface and mapping of the chemical after corrosion occurs. The experimental procedure of this method is presented to provide technical details to facilitate similar research and highlight pitfalls that may be encountered during such experiments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/59523DOI Listing
May 2019

African American Patients With Hidradenitis Suppurativa Have Significant Health Care Disparities: A Retrospective Study.

J Cutan Med Surg 2019 May/Jun;23(3):334-336

1 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Dermatology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1203475418803077DOI Listing
December 2019

Office-based dermatologic diagnostic procedure utilization in the United States Medicare population from 2000-2016.

Int J Dermatol 2019 Nov 21;58(11):1317-1322. Epub 2019 Apr 21.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Dermatology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA.

Background: Potassium hydroxide preparations (KOH) and tissue examinations for ova and parasites (O&P) are cost-effective office-based tests. No studies have quantified their utilization and economic impact.

Methods: The objective is to determine the billing patterns and costs of office-based diagnostic procedures in the Medicare population. We conducted a cross sectional study using the Part B National Summary Data File (2000-2016) and the Physician and Other Supplier Public Use File (2012-2015) released by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

Results: In 2016, the total number of claims among all providers was 28,432 (KOH) and 52,182 (O&P), representing a decrease since 2000 (KOH, -41.8%; O&P, -43.4%). The total claims for in-office procedures by dermatologists per 10,000 beneficiaries decreased between 2012 and 2015 (KOH, -18.8%; O&P, -26.6%). Fewer dermatologists submitted claims for the tests (KOH, -11.3%; O&P, -16.6%). The total single (SB) and multiple (MB) biopsy claims by dermatologists per 10,000 beneficiaries decreased between 2012 and 2015 (SB, -1.8%; MB, -2.7%). The 2016 aggregate payments (% change since 2000) for KOH and O&P were $163,127.75 (-60.4%) and $299,074.18 (-61.6%), respectively; for SB and MB, they were $240,047,487.98 (+142.3%) and $38,214,117.22 (+79.2%), respectively.

Conclusion: Fewer dermatologists submit claims for KOH and O&P each year. Future studies should evaluate whether this is due to a loss of cost-efficacy, and secondly, if it is related to decreased reimbursement, burdensome in-office laboratory regulations, or changing provider preferences.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.14448DOI Listing
November 2019

Ultra-High-Frequency Reprogramming of Individual Long-Term Hematopoietic Stem Cells Yields Low Somatic Variant Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

Cell Rep 2019 03;26(10):2580-2592.e7

Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. Electronic address:

Efficiency of reprogramming of human cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has remained low. We report that individual adult human CD49f long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) can be reprogrammed into iPSCs at close to 50% efficiency using Sendai virus transduction. This exquisite sensitivity to reprogramming is specific to LT-HSCs, since it progressively decreases in committed progenitors. LT-HSC reprogramming can follow multiple paths and is most efficient when transduction is performed after the cells have exited G. Sequencing of 75 paired skin fibroblasts/LT-HSC samples collected from nine individuals revealed that LT-HSCs contain a lower load of somatic single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and indels than skin fibroblasts and accumulate about 12 SNVs/year. Mutation analysis revealed that LT-HSCs and fibroblasts have very different somatic mutation signatures and that somatic mutations in iPSCs generally exist prior to reprogramming. LT-HSCs may become the preferred cell source for the production of clinical-grade iPSCs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2019.02.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6754097PMC
March 2019

Percutaneous liver biopsy in Fontan patients.

Pediatr Radiol 2019 03 30;49(3):342-350. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 3401 Civic Center Blvd., Radiology 3NW47, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.

Background: Patients who have undergone the Fontan operation for palliation of congenital heart disease with single-ventricle pathophysiology are at high risk for developing progressive liver fibrosis. Pathological assessment from percutaneous liver biopsy is central to the management of Fontan-associated liver disease, but liver biopsy in this vulnerable population poses unique challenges and potential risks.

Objective: This retrospective study describes our experience with percutaneous liver biopsy performed to assess changes of Fontan-associated liver disease, with particular regard to procedural outcomes.

Materials And Methods: Data from liver biopsy procedure reports, pathology reports, cardiac angiography pressure measurements and laboratory values of patients with single ventricle heart disease after the Fontan operation who underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy performed in interventional radiology at a pediatric tertiary care center during a 3-year period were retrospectively analyzed.

Results: Sixty-eight liver biopsies were performed in 67 patients (mean age: 20.2 years, range: 7.2-39 years). The technical success rate was 100%, and tissue was adequate for assessing liver disease in 100% of the procedures, including biopsies performed with a single pass. Anticoagulation was routinely suspended before biopsy, and no cardiac complications were encountered due to this suspension. A coaxial biopsy system using an 18-gauge (G) full-core instrument through a 17-G introducer trocar was most commonly used, in 41/68 cases (60%). The most common trough length was 2.3 cm, used in 37 cases (54%). One pass was made in 27 procedures (40%) and two passes in 30 (44%); tract embolization with gelatin sponge was performed in 52 (76%). The only complication was hemorrhage, which occurred in 5/68 (7.4%) of the biopsies, minor in four (5.9%) and major in one (1.5%) -- similar to rates reported for liver biopsy in non-Fontan patients. Hemorrhage had a delayed presentation in three of these five cases. Immediate post-biopsy hemoglobin decrease of ≥2 mg/dL showed a low sensitivity for hemorrhage. The mean Fontan pressure measured during cardiac angiography was 13.8 mmHg, and shunt pressures were not associated with an increased risk of hemorrhage.

Conclusion: Percutaneous liver biopsy in Fontan patients can be performed safely with high technical success rates and without increased complication rates. Meticulous technique and close observation are recommended to reduce post-biopsy complications. The degree of right heart pressure elevation was not associated with hemorrhage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-018-4311-9DOI Listing
March 2019

Safety and efficacy of topical cantharidin for the treatment of pediatric molluscum contagiosum: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial.

Int J Dermatol 2018 Aug 15;57(8):1001-1006. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Dermatology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

Topical cantharidin is a commonly used treatment for molluscum contagiosum (MC). However, studies validating its safety and efficacy are limited. We conducted a 6-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with subsequent open-label extension to assess the safety and effectiveness of cantharidin in treating pediatric MC. Ninety-four participants with MC were randomized to receive cantharidin or placebo, with or without occlusion. The primary outcome was complete lesion clearance. Secondary outcomes included post-treatment lesion count, adverse events, and side effects. No significant differences between the study arms, including baseline lesion count, were observed. The overall mean (SD) baseline lesion count was 22.2 (12.9). The number of participants achieving total clearance is as follows: 7/23 (30.4%) in the cantharidin only arm, 10/24 (41.7%) in the cantharidin with occlusion arm, 2/25 (8.0%) in the placebo with occlusion arm, and 3/22 (13.6%) in the placebo only arm. Post hoc analysis demonstrated that 17/47 (36.2%) participants in the combined cantharidin arms achieved clearance compared to 5/47 (10.6%) in the placebo arms (P = 0.0065). The mean (SD) lesion count change from baseline was -5.1 (12.2) in the placebo only arm; the mean change (SD) was -17.4 (12.8) in the cantharidin only arm (P = 0.0033) and -15.9 (11.6) in the cantharidin with occlusion arm (P = 0.0101). No serious adverse events or side effects were observed. Topical cantharidin was well-tolerated and associated with the resolution of MC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.14079DOI Listing
August 2018

Helen Ollendorff Curth: A dermatologist's lasting legacy.

Int J Womens Dermatol 2017 Mar 16;3(1 Suppl):S70-S74. Epub 2017 Feb 16.

Department of Dermatology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijwd.2017.02.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5419040PMC
March 2017

Helen Ollendorff-Curth: A dermatologist's lasting legacy.

Int J Womens Dermatol 2016 Sep 18;2(3):108-112. Epub 2016 Jul 18.

Department of Dermatology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijwd.2016.06.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5418872PMC
September 2016
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