Publications by authors named "Anthea Van Parys"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Assessment of Dietary Choline Intake, Contributing Food Items and Associations with One-carbon and Lipid Metabolites in Middle-aged and Elderly Adults: The Hordaland Health Study.

J Nutr 2021 Oct 13. Epub 2021 Oct 13.

Centre for Nutrition, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Background: Choline is an essential nutrient for humans and is involved in various physiological functions. Through its metabolite betaine, it is closely connected to the one-carbon metabolism and the fat-soluble choline form phosphatidylcholine is essential for very-low-density-lipoprotein synthesis and secretion in the liver connecting choline to the lipid metabolism. Dietary recommendations for choline are not available in the Nordic countries primarily due to data scarcity.

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the dietary intake of total choline and individual choline forms, dietary sources, and the association of total choline intake with circulating one-carbon metabolites and lipids.

Methods: We included 5746 participants in the Hordaland Health Study (HUSK), a survey including community-dwelling adults born in 1925-1927 (mean age 72 years, 55% women) and 1950-1951 (mean age 48 years, 57% women). Dietary data was obtained using a 169-item food frequency questionnaire and choline content was calculated using the USDA Database for Choline Content of Common Foods, release 2. Metabolites of the one-carbon and lipid metabolism were measured in a non-fasting blood sample obtained at baseline and association with total choline intake were assessed using polynomial splines.

Results: The geometric mean (95% prediction interval) energy-adjusted total choline intake was 260 (170, 389) mg/d with phosphatidylcholine being the main form (44%). The major food items providing dietary choline were eggs, low-fat milk, potatoes, and leafy vegetables. Dietary total choline was inversely associated with circulating concentrations of total homocysteine, glycine and serine and positively associated with choline, methionine, cystathionine, cysteine, trimethyllysine, trimethylamine-N-oxide and dimethylglycine. A weak association was observed between choline intake and serum lipids.

Conclusion: Phosphatidylcholine was the most consumed choline form in community-dwelling adults in Norway. Our findings suggest that choline intake is associated with the concentration of most metabolites involved in the one-carbon and lipid metabolism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxab367DOI Listing
October 2021

Food Sources Contributing to Intake of Choline and Individual Choline Forms in a Norwegian Cohort of Patients With Stable Angina Pectoris.

Front Nutr 2021 14;8:676026. Epub 2021 May 14.

Centre for Nutrition, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Choline is an essential nutrient involved in a wide range of physiological functions. It occurs in water- and lipid-soluble forms in the body and diet. Foods with a known high choline content are eggs, beef, chicken, milk, fish, and selected plant foods. An adequate intake has been set in the US and Europe, however, not yet in the Nordic countries. A higher intake of lipid-soluble choline forms has been associated with increased risk of acute myocardial infarction, highlighting the need for knowledge about food sources of the individual choline forms. In general, little is known about the habitual intake and food sources of choline, and individual choline forms. Investigate foods contributing to the intake of total choline and individual choline forms. The study population consisted of 1,929 patients with stable angina pectoris from the Western Norway B Vitamin Intervention Trial. Dietary intake data was obtained through a 169-item food frequency questionnaire. Intake of total choline and individual choline forms was quantified using the USDA database, release 2. The geometric mean (95% prediction interval) total choline intake was 287 (182, 437) mg/d. Phosphatidylcholine accounted for 42.5% of total choline intake, followed by free choline (25.8%) and glycerophosphocholine (21.2%). Phosphocholine and sphingomyelin contributed 4.2 and 4.5%, respectively. The main dietary choline sources were eggs, milk, fresh vegetables, lean fish, and bread. In general, animal food sources were the most important contributors to choline intake. This study is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to assess the intake of all choline forms and their dietary sources in a European population. Most choline was consumed in the form of phosphatidylcholine and animal food sources contributed most to choline intake. There is a need for accurate estimates of the dietary intake of this essential nutrient to issue appropriate dietary recommendations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2021.676026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8160433PMC
May 2021

The Association of Meat Intake With All-Cause Mortality and Acute Myocardial Infarction Is Age-Dependent in Patients With Stable Angina Pectoris.

Front Nutr 2021 4;8:642612. Epub 2021 Mar 4.

Department of Clinical Science, Centre for Nutrition, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Red and processed meat intake have been associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and a restricted intake is encouraged in patients with cardiovascular disease. However, evidence on the association between total meat intake and clinical outcomes in this patient group is lacking. To investigate the association between total meat intake and risk of all-cause mortality, acute myocardial infarction, cancer, and gastrointestinal cancer in patients with stable angina pectoris. We also investigated whether age modified these associations. This prospective cohort study consisted of 1,929 patients (80% male, mean age 62 years) with stable angina pectoris from the Western Norway B-Vitamin Intervention Trial. Dietary assessment was performed by the administration of a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate the association between a relative increase in total meat intake and the outcomes of interest. The association per 50 g/1,000 kcal higher intake of total meat with morbidity and mortality were generally inconclusive but indicated an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction [HR: 1.26 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.61)] and gastrointestinal cancer [1.23 (0.70, 2.16)]. However, we observed a clear effect modification by age, where total meat intake was associated with an increased risk of mortality and acute myocardial infarction among younger individuals, but an attenuation, and even reversal of the risk association with increasing age. Our findings support the current dietary guidelines emphasizing a restricted meat intake in cardiovascular disease patients but highlights the need for further research on the association between meat intake and health outcomes in elderly populations. Future studies should investigate different types of meat separately in other CVD-cohorts, in different age-groups, as well as in the general population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2021.642612DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7969515PMC
March 2021

Dietary choline is related to increased risk of acute myocardial infarction in patients with stable angina pectoris.

Biochimie 2020 Jun 7;173:68-75. Epub 2019 Nov 7.

Centre for Nutrition, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.

High plasma choline has been associated with the metabolic syndrome and risk of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease. However, dietary choline is not correlated with choline plasma concentrations, and there are few studies and contradictory evidence regarding dietary choline and cardiovascular events. In addition, a recommended dietary allowance for choline has not been established and remains a point of contention. This study assessed the association between dietary choline, including choline forms, and risk of incident acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with suspected stable angina pectoris (SAP). In total 1981 patients (80% men, median age 62) from the Western Norway B Vitamin Intervention Trial were included in this analysis. Information on dietary choline was obtained using a 169-item food frequency questionnaire. The Cardiovascular Disease in Norway project provided data on AMI. Risk associations were estimated using Cox-regression analysis using energy-adjusted choline intake. Median (25th, 75th percentile) total energy-adjusted choline intake was 288 (255, 326) mg/d. During a median (25th, 75th percentile) follow-up of 7.5 (6.3, 8.8) years, 312 (15.7%) patients experienced at least one AMI. Increased intakes of energy-adjusted choline (HR [95% CI] per 50 mg increase 1.11 [1.03, 1.20]), phosphatidylcholine (HR per 50 mg increase 1.24 [1.08, 1.42]) and sphingomyelin (HR per 5 mg increase 1.16 [1.02, 1.31]) were associated with higher AMI risk. In conclusion, higher dietary intakes of total choline, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin were associated with increased risk of AMI in patients with SAP. Future studies are necessary to explore underlying mechanisms for this observation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biochi.2019.11.001DOI Listing
June 2020
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