Publications by authors named "Antônio M Cruz-Filho"

5 Publications

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Detection of the internal anatomy of lower anterior teeth using cone-beam computed tomography.

Aust Endod J 2021 Mar 2. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.

Morphology study of root canal systems is essential for a correct diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of root canal treatment. This study aimed to analyse the dental anatomy of the lower anterior teeth, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Lower anterior teeth were classified in terms of type, number and location of root canals, evaluating the bilaterality of anatomical occurrences and determining whether the gender and age influence the findings. We analysed 749 CBCT of patients attending the School of Dentistry for different reasons. Spearman's correlations and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to analyse data (α = 0.05). There was no significant correlation between gender (male and female) and anatomy of the canals 33 (P = 0.162), 32 (P = 0.815), 31 (P = 0.708), 41 (P = 0.422), 42 (P = 0.382) and 43 (P = 0.063). There was a significant correlation between age and anatomy of the canals 33 (P = 0.045), 32 (P = 0.033), 31 (P = 0.022), 41 (P = 0.000), 42 (P = 0.037) and 43 (P = 0.037). There was no significant correlation between gender and patients' age (P = 0.325). There was no anatomical difference between the bilateral pairs (right and left homologous teeth) (P > 0.05). The most common anatomical configuration was single-canal teeth (85.29%), followed by the configuration in which one canal leaves the chamber, divides into two and unite again (12.88%). Anatomy of the lateral incisors and lower canines does not change with the gender of patients. However, as age rises, single canals and the incidence of division into two canals ending in a single foramen also increases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aej.12497DOI Listing
March 2021

Morphology and microhardness of dentin at the furcation area of mandibular molars.

J Endod 2014 Jan 8;40(1):129-32. Epub 2013 Nov 8.

Department of Endodontics, Ribeirão Preto Dental School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil.

Introduction: This study evaluated dentin morphology and microhardness at the furcation area of mandibular molars.

Methods: Tooth segments of mandibular molars were embedded in resin blocks and bisected longitudinally (n = 20), and the furcation area was delimited by tracing 2 orthogonal lines from the most concave point of the outer surface of the furcation toward the mesial and distal canal entrances. In half of the specimens, Knoop microhardness was measured in 2 directions in the furcation area: vertically, parallel to the orthogonal lines and the bisector of the angle formed by them; and horizontally, in the outer (close to the pulp chamber floor), inner (close to the cementum), and middle dentin layers. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test (α = 0.05). The other half of the specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate dentin morphology and trajectory of the tubules.

Results: No statistically significant difference (P > .05) was found among the mesial (46.5 ± 6.4), central (47.3 ± 8.1), and distal (49.7 ± 6.5) orthogonal lines. The inner dentin layer (51.7 ± 2.5) was statistically similar to the middle (46.3 ± 2.9) (P > .05), which was similar to the outer layer (41.4 ± 2.4) (P > .05). The inner layer was significantly harder than the outer layer (P < .05). The morphologic analysis revealed a tendency of calcification of the tubules from the outer toward the inner layer.

Conclusions: Dentin microhardness at the furcation area is uniform in its 3 vertical axes, but the inner dentin layer is harder than the outer layer. The dentinal tubules follow a centripetal direction toward the inner layer, in which dentin is much more mineralized.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2013.10.004DOI Listing
January 2014

Effect of chelating solutions on the microhardness of root canal lumen dentin.

J Endod 2011 Mar;37(3):358-62

Department of Endodontics, Ribeirão Preto Dental School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil.

Introduction: The greatest reduction in microhardness of the most superficial layer of dentin of the root canal lumen is desired. The use of chelating agents during biomechanical preparation of root canals removes smear layer, increasing the access of the irrigant into the dentin tubules to allow adequate disinfection, and also reduces dentin microhardness, facilitating the action of endodontic instruments. This study evaluated the effect of different chelating solutions on the microhardness of the most superficial dentin layer from the root canal lumen.

Methods: Thirty-five recently extracted single-rooted maxillary central incisors were instrumented, and the roots were longitudinally sectioned in a mesiodistal direction to expose the entire canal extension. The specimens were distributed in seven groups according to the final irrigation: 15% EDTA, 10% citric acid, 5% malic acid, 5% acetic acid, apple vinegar, 10% sodium citrate, and control (no irrigation). A standardized volume of 50 μL of each chelating solution was used for 5 minutes. Dentin microhardness was measured with a Knoop indenter under a 10-g load and a 15-second dwell time. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer multiple-comparison test at 5% significance level.

Results: EDTA and citric acid had the greatest overall effect, causing a sharp decrease in dentin microhardness without a significant difference (p > .05) from each other. However, both chelators differed significantly from the other solutions (p < .001). Sodium citrate and deionized water were similar to each other (p > .05) and did not affect dentin microhardness. Apple vinegar, acetic acid, and malic acid were similar to each other (p > .05) and presented intermediate results.

Conclusion: Except for sodium citrate, all tested chelating solutions reduced microhardness of the most superficial root canal dentin layer. EDTA and citric acid were the most efficient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2010.12.001DOI Listing
March 2011

Comparative study of physico-chemical properties of MTA-based and Portland cements.

Acta Odontol Latinoam 2010 ;23(3):175-81

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Cuiabá (UNIC), Cuiabá, MT, Brazil.

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the physicochemical properties of gray and white structural and nonstructural Portland cement, gray and white ProRoot MTA and MTA BIO. The water/powder ratio, setting time, solubility and pH (hydrogen-ion potential) changes of the materials were evaluated. Tests followed specification #57 from the American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association (2000) for endodontic sealing materials and pH was determined by a digital pH meter. The test results were statistically analyzed by variance analyses for global comparison and by the complementary Tukey's test for pairwise comparisons (5%). Considering the water/powder ratio, no significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed among the cements. MTA BIO (33.10 +/- 2.30) had the lowest setting time (p < 0.05), gray ProRoot MTA (10.10 +/- 2.70) had the highest (p < 0.05). White nonstructural Portland cement (2.55 +/- 0.08) had the highest solubility (p < 0.05), while gray ProRoot MTA (1.03 +/- 0.12) had the lowest (p < 0.05), although all materials showed solubility values in compliance to ANSI/ADA. No difference (p > 0.05) was observed among materials when considering pH evaluation. The pH levels were highly alkaline immediately after immersion in solution, remaining stable throughout the test period. The authors conclude that the cements had similar water/powder proportions. MTA BIO had the shortest setting time and gray ProRoot MTA had the lowest solubility. All cements had similar behavior in the pH analysis.
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June 2011

Evaluation of the effect of EDTA, EGTA and CDTA on dentin adhesiveness and microleakage with different root canal sealers.

Braz Dent J 2002 ;13(2):123-8

Faculty of Dentistry, University of Ribeirão Preto (UNAERP), SP, Brazil.

The effect of chelating solutions EDTA, EGTA and CDTA on human dentin adhesiveness and microleakage with 4 sealers (Sealer 26, Sealapex, N-Rickert and Endofill) was evaluated in vitro. Whether or not there was a mathematical correlation between the tests of adhesiveness and microleakage was also evaluated. A total of eighty maxillary and mandibular molars were used to test adhesiveness. After wearing of the occlusal surface to obtain a flat surface, the sealer was placed with an aluminum cylinder (10 mm x 6 mm). Adhesiveness was evaluated with a 4444 Instron universal testing machine. Microleakage was evaluated in 160 maxillary canines after root canal instrumentation, obturation and clearing. The penetration of India ink in the apical region was measured with a measurescope. The teeth were divided into 4 groups: group 1, distilled water, group 2, EDTA; group 3, EGTA; group 4, CDTA. Sealer 26 and EDTA had the best results (p<0.01) for adhesiveness and microleakage. There was no correlation between the test for adhesiveness and microleakage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0103-64402002000200009DOI Listing
January 2003