Publications by authors named "Anshad Mohamed Abdulla"

7 Publications

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Recent update on potential cytotoxicity, biocompatibility and preventive measures of biomaterials used in dentistry.

Biomater Sci 2021 May;9(9):3244-3283

Faculty, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, 110062, India.

Dental treatment is provided for a wide variety of oral health problems like dental caries, periodontal diseases, periapical infections, replacement of missing teeth and orthodontic problems. Various biomaterials, like composite resins, amalgam, glass ionomer cement, acrylic resins, metal alloys, impression materials, bone grafts, membranes, local anaesthetics, etc., are used for dental applications. The physical and chemical characteristics of these materials influence the outcome of dental treatment. It also impacts on the biological, allergic and toxic potential of biomaterials. With innovations in science and their positive results, there is also a need for awareness about the biological risks of these biomaterials. The aim of dental treatment is to have effective, yet safe, and long-lasting results for the benefit of patients. For this, it is important to have a thorough understanding of biomaterials and their effects on local and systemic health. Materials used in dentistry undergo a series of analyses before their oral applications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first and original review that discusses the reasons for and studies on the toxicity of commonly used biomaterials for applications in dentistry. It will help clinicians to formulate a methodical approach for the selection of dental biomaterials, thus providing an awareness for forecasting their risk of toxic reactions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d1bm00233cDOI Listing
May 2021

Can Herbal Extracts Serve as Antibacterial Root Canal Irrigating Solutions? Antimicrobial Efficacy of , , , and Sodium Hypochlorite on Biofilms Formed on Tooth Substrate: Study.

J Pharm Bioallied Sci 2020 Aug 28;12(Suppl 1):S423-S429. Epub 2020 Aug 28.

Department of Pedodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Asian Institute of Medical Science and Technology University, Bedong, Malaysia.

Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of , , and on biofilms formed on the tooth substrate. Sodium hypochlorite was used as a positive control. DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide), the vehicle for the herbal extracts, was used as the negative control.

Materials And Methods: Extracted human teeth were biomechanically prepared, vertically sectioned, placed in the tissue culture wells exposing the root canal surface to to form a biofilm. At the end of the third week, all groups were treated for 15 min with the test solutions and the control. The results were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively.

Results: Statistical analysis was performed by using one-way analysis of variance and compared by the Mann-Whitney test using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 20.0. The qualitative assay with the 3-week biofilm on the canal portion showed complete inhibition of bacterial growth for NaOCl, whereas samples treated with herbal solutions showed significant reduction of bacterial growth compared to control group, which showed 139.9 × 10 CFU/mL among the experimental herbal solutions groups. has shown maximum bacterial count followed by and .

Conclusion: NaOCl 5% showed maximum antibacterial activity against 3-week biofilm on tooth substrate. , , and showed statistically significant antibacterial activity against 3-week biofilm. The use of herbal alternatives might prove to be advantageous considering the several undesirable characteristics of NaOCl.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jpbs.JPBS_127_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7595561PMC
August 2020

Recent advances of gold nanoparticles as biomaterial in dentistry.

Int J Pharm 2020 Aug 2;586:119596. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi 110062, India. Electronic address:

Major goal of dental treatment is to eradicate the existing diseases of the oral cavity and implement preventive measures to control the spread of the diseases. Various interventions are being used to cure the dental diseases. Due to the nanostructures, high surface volume and biocompatibility, Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been experimented in the treatment of gum diseases, dental caries, tissue engineering, dental implantology and diagnosis of cancers. GNPs possess antifungal and antibacterial activity, hence are incorporated in various biomaterials to potentiate the effect. They also enhance the mechanical properties of materials leading to improved outcomes. They are available in different sizes and concentrations to exhibits its beneficial outcomes. These properties of GNPs make these materials as choice of fillers in biomaterials. This review aims to discuss the effect of incorporation of GNPs in several biomaterials used for dental and medical applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2020.119596DOI Listing
August 2020

Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma: a case report and review of literature.

Afr Health Sci 2019 Dec;19(4):3253-3263

Department of Restorative Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Pincode- 61471.

Background: Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (CA-ex-PA) is extremely unusual in minor salivary glands of oral cavity. CAex-PA is a carcinomatous change as a primary or as a recurrence of pleomorphic adenoma.

Objective: Due to resemblance of clinical symptoms of Ca ex PA and benign pleomorphic adenoma, it is mandatory for surgeons to keep high degree of clinical alertness, considering the peculiarity of this tumor.

Case Report: 54-year-old male presented with swelling on left side in the pre-auricular region from the middle of zygomatic arch to mastoid process and from tragus of the ear up to angle of mandible. Fine needle aspiration cytology revealed a mixture of benign and malignant components. Total left parotidectomy with left radical neck dissection followed by reconstruction with cervicodeltopectoral flap was performed. Combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy were given to patient. Histologic examination and pre-operative fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed the diagnosis of Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (CA-ex-PA). Two-year follow-up of patient showed no recurrence of the lesion.

Conclusion: Due to the similarity in the clinical symptoms of CA-ex-PA and benign pleomorphic adenoma, it is vital that clinicians maintain a high degree of clinical vigilance, considering the oddity of this malignancy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v19i4.50DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7040348PMC
December 2019

Levels of Mercury in Fish-Eating Children, With and Without Amalgam Restoration.

J Pharm Bioallied Sci 2019 May;11(Suppl 2):S397-S401

Department of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Asian Institute of Medicine, Science and Technology (AIMST) University, Kedah, Malaysia.

Background: Mercury is a naturally occurring metal that exists in three forms: elemental (metallic), inorganic, and organic mercury. Amalgam, which is an alloy of inorganic mercury, is used as a restorative material in dentistry. Organic mercury gets ingested in the body mainly by the consumption of seafood. Mercury is also stated to cause various adverse health effects such as gastrointestinal disturbances, dermatitis, muscle weakness, and neurological disorders. In recent years, the use of amalgam has become a controversy stating the various adverse effects of mercury. Hence, the study was conducted to determine and compare the variation in levels of organic and inorganic mercury in fish-eating children before and after placement of amalgam restoration.

Materials And Methods: Seventy-five subjects, 42 males (56%) and 35 females (44%) of age group ranging 7-13 years, living in South Canara district of Karnataka, India, were selected as a part of the study. Hair and urine samples were collected for estimation of organic and inorganic levels of mercury, respectively. Informed consent was collected from all the participating subjects.

Results: On comparison between organic and inorganic mercury levels during the study period, the concentration of organic mercury in hair samples was greater irrespective of amalgam restorations present (1.172 and 0.085, respectively; < 0.001).

Conclusion: Thus inorganic levels of mercury do not seem to pose a threat as much as the organic levels observed in hair, which remain fairly constant for a longer period of time. Hence in a coastal region where this study was undertaken and fish being a staple food, the risk could probably be attributed to more of an organic toxicity than an inorganic one. Thus amalgam is relatively safe to be practiced and the controversy against it should be reevaluated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/JPBS.JPBS_44_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6555354PMC
May 2019

Endodontic Management of a Severely Dilacerated Mandibular Third Molar: Case Report and Clinical Considerations.

Case Rep Dent 2018 8;2018:7594147. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Department of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Asian Institute of Medicine, Science and Technology (AIMST) University, Kedah, Malaysia.

This article aims at providing an insight to the clinical modifications required for the endodontic management of severely dilacerated mandibular third molar. A 35-year-old patient was referred for the root canal treatment of the mandibular left third molar. An intraoral periapical radiograph revealed a severe curvature in both the canals. A wide trapezoidal access was prepared following the use of intermediate-sized files for apical preparation. Owing to increased flexibility, Hero Shaper NITI files were used for the biomechanical preparation and single cone obturation was carried out. Third molars owing to their most posterior location-limited access coupled with a severe curvature pose utmost clinical challenges require meticulous skill, advanced technology, and patience to achieve success.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/7594147DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6196887PMC
October 2018

Ameloblastic Fibroodontoma: Uncommon Case Presentation in a 6-Year-Old Child with Review of the Literature.

Case Rep Med 2017 13;2017:9483738. Epub 2017 Aug 13.

Department of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Asian Institute of Medicine, Science & Technology (AIMST) University, Kedah Darul Aman, Malaysia.

Ameloblastic fibroodontoma is a benign mixed odontogenic neoplasm considered in patients with asymptomatic swelling and unerupted teeth that exhibit histologic features between ameloblastic fibroma and complex odontoma. Radiographically, this lesion appears as radiolucency admixed with focal radio opaque masses of irregular shapes and sizes. This lesion is confirmed by the presence of proliferating odontogenic epithelium, ectomesenchyme, and dental hard tissue formation on pathological analysis supplementing clinical and radiographic findings. As this tumour is less commonly seen in routine clinical practice, ameloblastic fibroodontoma with detailed orofacial features and periodic approach to its diagnosis is discussed. This paper reports a case of ameloblastic fibroodontoma of the mandible in a 6-year-old male patient with an uncommon case presentation and review of the literature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/9483738DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5572577PMC
August 2017