Publications by authors named "Anouar Idali"

2 Publications

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Cancer stemness in Wnt-driven mammary tumorigenesis.

Carcinogenesis 2014 Jan 16;35(1):2-13. Epub 2013 Aug 16.

Department of Pathology, Josephine Nefkens Institute, Erasmus MC 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands and.

Wnt signaling plays a central role in mammary stem cell (MaSC) homeostasis and in breast cancer. In particular, epigenetic alterations at different members of the Wnt pathway have been identified among triple-negative, basal-like breast cancers. Previously, we developed a mouse model for metaplastic breast adenocarcinoma, a subtype of triple-negative breast cancer, by targeting a hypomorphic mutations in the endogenous Apc gene (Apc (1572T/+)). Here, by employing the CD24 and CD29 cell surface antigens, we have identified a subpopulation of mammary cancer stem cells (MaCSCs) from Apc (1572T/+) capable of self-renewal and differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of micro- and macrolung metastases and preliminary intravenous transplantation assays suggest that the MaCSCs underlie metastasis at distant organ sites. Expression profiling of the normal and tumor cell subpopulations encompassing MaSCs and CSCs revealed that the normal stem cell compartment is more similar to tumor cells than to their own differentiated progenies. Accordingly, Wnt signaling appears to be active in both the normal and cancer stem cell compartments, although at different levels. By comparing normal with cancer mouse mammary compartments, we identified a MaCSC gene signature able to predict outcome in breast cancer in man. Overall, our data indicate that constitutive Wnt signaling activation affects self-renewal and differentiation of MaSCs leading to metaplasia and basal-like adenocarcinomas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgt279DOI Listing
January 2014

NAPP: the Nucleic Acid Phylogenetic Profile Database.

Nucleic Acids Res 2012 Jan 8;40(Database issue):D205-9. Epub 2011 Oct 8.

Institut de Génétique et Microbiologie, UMR 8621, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, bâtiment 400, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France.

Nucleic acid phylogenetic profiling (NAPP) classifies coding and non-coding sequences in a genome according to their pattern of conservation across other genomes. This procedure efficiently distinguishes clusters of functional non-coding elements in bacteria, particularly small RNAs and cis-regulatory RNAs, from other conserved sequences. In contrast to other non-coding RNA detection pipelines, NAPP does not require the presence of conserved RNA secondary structure and therefore is likely to identify previously undetected RNA genes or elements. Furthermore, as NAPP clusters contain both coding and non-coding sequences with similar occurrence profiles, they can be analyzed under a functional perspective. We recently improved the NAPP pipeline and applied it to a collection of 949 bacterial and 68 archaeal species. The database and web interface available at http://napp.u-psud.fr/ enable detailed analysis of NAPP clusters enriched in non-coding RNAs, graphical display of phylogenetic profiles, visualization of predicted RNAs in their genome context and extraction of predicted RNAs for use with genome browsers or other software.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkr807DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3245103PMC
January 2012