Publications by authors named "Annie Falguieres"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Development and validation of an efficient ultrasound assisted extraction of phenolic compounds from flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seeds.

Ultrason Sonochem 2015 Sep 28;26:176-185. Epub 2015 Feb 28.

Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes Cultures (LBLGC), UPRES EA 1207, Université d'Orléans, Chartres, France. Electronic address:

Flaxseed accumulates in its seedcoat a macromolecular complex composed of lignan (secoisolariciresinol diglucoside, SDG), flavonol (herbacetin diglucoside, HDG) and hydroxycinnamic acids (p-couramic, caffeic and ferulic acid glucosides). Their antioxidant and/or cancer chemopreventive properties support their interest in human health and therefore, the demand for their extraction. In the present study, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of flaxseed phenolic compounds was investigated. Scanning Electron Microscopy imaging and histochemical analysis revealed the deep alteration of the seedcoat ultrastructure and the release of the mucilage following ultrasound treatment. Therefore, this method was found to be very efficient for the reduction of mucilage entrapment of flaxseed phenolics. The optimal conditions for UAE phenolic compounds extraction from flaxseeds were found to be: water as solvent supplemented with 0.2N of sodium hydroxide for alkaline hydrolysis of the SDG-HMG complex, an extraction time of 60 min at a temperature of 25°C and an ultrasound frequency of 30 kHz. Under these optimized and validated conditions, highest yields of SDG, HDG and hydroxycinnamic acid glucosides were detected in comparison to other published methods. Therefore, the procedure presented herein is a valuable method for efficient extraction and quantification of the main flaxseed phenolics. Moreover, this UAE is of particular interest within the context of green chemistry in terms of reducing energy consumption and valuation of flaxseed cakes as by-products resulting from the production of flax oil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultsonch.2015.02.008DOI Listing
September 2015

Microwave-assisted extraction of herbacetin diglucoside from flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seed cakes and its quantification using an RP-HPLC-UV system.

Molecules 2014 Mar 10;19(3):3025-37. Epub 2014 Mar 10.

Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes Cultures UPRES EA 1207, Equipe Lignanes des Linacées, Université d'Orléans - Antenne Scientifique Universitaire de Chartres, 21 rue de Loigny la Bataille, 28000 Chartres, France.

Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seeds are widely used for oil extraction and the cold-pressed flaxseed (or linseed) cakes obtained during this process constitute a valuable by-product. The flavonol herbacetin diglucoside (HDG) has been previously reported as a constituent of the flaxseed lignan macromolecule linked through ester bonds to the linker molecule hydroxymethylglutaric acid. In this context, the development and validation of a new approach using microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of HDG from flaxseed cakes followed by quantification with a reverse-phase HPLC system with UV detection was purposed. The experimental parameters affecting the HDG extraction yield, such as microwave power, extraction time and sodium hydroxide concentration, from the lignan macromolecule were optimized. A maximum HDG concentration of 5.76 mg/g DW in flaxseed cakes was measured following an irradiation time of 6 min, for a microwave power of 150 W using a direct extraction in 0.1 M NaOH in 70% (v/v) aqueous methanol. The optimized method was proven to be rapid and reliable in terms of precision, repeatability, stability and accuracy for the extraction of HDG. Comparison with a conventional extraction method demonstrated that MAE is more effective and less time-consuming.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules19033025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6270660PMC
March 2014

Podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin in Juniperus bermudiana and 12 other Juniperus species: optimization of extraction, method validation, and quantification.

J Agric Food Chem 2011 Aug 15;59(15):8101-7. Epub 2011 Jul 15.

Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes Cultures (LBLGC), UPRES EA 1207, Antenne Scientifique Universitaire de Chartres (ASUC), Université d'Orléans, Chartres, France.

The lignans podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin are secondary metabolites with potent pharmaceutical applications in cancer therapy. However, the supply of podophyllotoxin from its current natural source, Podophyllum hexandrum, is becoming increasingly problematic, and alternative sources are therefore urgently needed. So far, podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin have been found in some Juniperus species, although at low levels in most cases. Moreover, extraction protocols deserve optimization. This study aimed at developing and validating an efficient extraction protocol of podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin from Juniperus species and applying it to 13 Juniperus species, among which some had never been previously analyzed. Juniperus bermudiana was used for the development and validation of an extraction protocol for podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin allowing extraction yields of up to 22.6 mg/g DW of podophyllotoxin and 4.4 mg/g DW deoxypodophyllotoxin, the highest values found in leaf extract of Juniperus. The optimized extraction protocol and HPLC separation from DAD or MS detections were established and validated to investigate podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin contents in aerial parts of 12 other Juniperus species. This allowed either higher yields to be obtained in some species reported to contain these two compounds or the occurrence of these compounds in some other species to be reported for the first time. This efficient protocol allows effective extraction of podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin from aerial parts of Juniperus species, which could therefore constitute interesting alternative sources of these valuable metabolites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf201410pDOI Listing
August 2011

Separation and identification by gel filtration and high-performance liquid chromatography with UV or electrochemical detection of the disulphides produced from cysteine and glutathione oxidation.

J Chromatogr A 2004 Mar;1031(1-2):125-33

Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, Unité Mixte de Recherche Scale (ENSIA-CNAM-INRA), 292 Rue Saint-Martin, 75141 Paris Cedex 03, France.

Methods for quantification of oxidised and reduced forms of glutathione (GSSG and GSH) and cysteine (CSSC and CSH) and the disulphide glutathione-cysteine (GSSC) resulting from the oxidation of the mixture of CSH and GSH are performed by RP-HPLC with coulometric and UV detection after separation of these compounds by size-exclusion fast protein liquid chromatography. The fractionation of the disulphides (GSSG, GSSC and CSSC) was achieved by size exclusion using a Superdex peptide column coupled with an UV detection at 254 nm. The conditions of separation of these compounds by RP-HPLC were optimised using the response surface methodology. Optimal peak resolution and retention times were obtained on a C18 YMC ODS AQ column with 20 mM of ammonium phosphate at pH 2.5 and 2% of acetonitrile in the elution phase. In these experimental conditions, CSH, CSSC, GSH and GSSG were eluted within 20 min. Coulometric detection enabled a sensitivity 100 times higher for the disulphides than the UV detection at 220 nm. These methods were applied to follow the consumption of thiols and the disulphide formation by three oxidising systems, sulphydryl oxidase, glutathione dehydroascorbate oxidoreductase and potassium bromate. This study revealed that the relative proportions of the disulphides formed were similar for the three oxidising systems when the reactions are in their state of equilibrium.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2003.10.136DOI Listing
March 2004