Publications by authors named "Anne-Laure Chetaille"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Higher concentrations of vitamin D in Canadian children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis compared to healthy controls are associated with more frequent use of vitamin D supplements and season of birth.

Nutr Res 2021 08 13;92:139-149. Epub 2021 Jun 13.

The University of Toronto and The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

A number of studies have demonstrated that patients with autoimmune disease have lower levels of vitamin D prompting speculation that vitamin D might suppress inflammation and immune responses in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).  The objective of this study was to compare vitamin D levels in children with JIA at disease onset with healthy children. We hypothesized that children and adolescents with JIA have lower vitamin D levels than healthy children and adolescents. Data from a Canadian cohort of children with new-onset JIA (n= 164, data collection 2007-2012) were compared to Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) data (n=4027, data collection 2007-2011). We compared 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations with measures of inflammation, vitamin D supplement use, milk intake, and season of birth. Mean 25(OH)D level was significantly higher in patients with JIA (79 ± 3.1 nmol/L) than in healthy controls (68 ± 1.8 nmol/L P <.05). Patients with JIA more often used vitamin D containing supplements (50% vs. 7%; P <.05). The prevalence of 25(OH)D deficiency (<30 nmol/L) was 6% for both groups. Children with JIA with 25(OH)D deficiency or insufficiency (<50 nmol/L) had higher C-reactive protein levels. Children with JIA were more often born in the fall and winter compared to healthy children. In contrast to earlier studies, we found vitamin D levels in Canadian children with JIA were higher compared to healthy children and associated with more frequent use of vitamin D supplements. Among children with JIA, low vitamin D levels were associated with indicators of greater inflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2021.05.007DOI Listing
August 2021

Clinical and psychosocial stress factors are associated with decline in physical activity over time in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Pediatr Rheumatol Online J 2021 Jun 29;19(1):97. Epub 2021 Jun 29.

IWK Health Centre and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.

Background: Physical activity (PA) patterns in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) over time are not well described. The aim of this study was to describe associations of physical activity (PA) with disease activity, function, pain, and psychosocial stress in the 2 years following diagnosis in an inception cohort of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

Methods: In 82 children with newly diagnosed JIA, PA levels, prospectively determined at enrollment, 12 and 24 months using the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Children (PAQ-C) and Adolescents (PAQ-A) raw scores, were evaluated in relation to disease activity as reflected by arthritis activity (Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS-71)), function, pain, and psychosocial stresses using a linear mixed model approach. Results in the JIA cohort were compared to normative Pediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study data derived from healthy children using z-scores.

Results: At enrollment, PA z-score levels of study participants were lower than those in the normative population (median z-score - 0.356; p = 0.005). At enrollment, PA raw scores were negatively associated with the psychosocial domain of the Juvenile Arthritis Quality of Life Questionnaire (r = - 0.251; p = 0.023). There was a significant decline in PAQ-C/A raw scores from baseline (median and IQR: 2.6, 1.4-3.1) to 24 months (median and IQR: 2.1, 1.4-2.7; p = 0.003). The linear mixed-effect model showed that PAQ-C/A raw scores in children with JIA decreased as age, disease duration, and ESR increased. The PAQ-C/A raw scores of the participants was also negatively influenced by an increase in disease activity as measured by the JADAS-71 (p <  0.001).

Conclusion: Canadian children with newly diagnosed JIA have lower PA levels than healthy children. The decline in PA levels over time was associated with disease activity and higher disease-specific psychosocial stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12969-021-00584-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8243495PMC
June 2021

Soluble Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

J Rheumatol 2021 05 15;48(5):760-766. Epub 2020 Oct 15.

R. Schneider, MD, L. Spiegel, MD, S.M. Tse, MD, R.S. Yeung, MD, PhD, Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto and the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Objectives: This study aimed to expand knowledge about soluble low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (sLRP1) in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) by determining associations of sLRP1 levels in nonsystemic JIA patients with clinical and inflammatory biomarker indicators of disease activity.

Methods: Plasma sLRP1 and 44 inflammation-related biomarkers were measured at enrollment and 6 months later in a cohort of 96 newly diagnosed Canadian patients with nonsystemic JIA. Relationships between sLRP1 levels and indicators of disease activity and biomarker levels were analyzed at both visits.

Results: At enrollment, sLRP1 levels correlated negatively with age and active joint counts. Children showed significantly higher levels of sLRP1 than adolescents (mean ranks: 55.4 and 41.9, respectively; = 0.02). Participants with 4 or fewer active joints, compared to those with 5 or more active joints, had significantly higher sLRP1 levels (mean ranks: 56.2 and 40.7, respectively; = 0.006). At enrollment, considering the entire cohort, sLRP1 correlated negatively with the number of active joints (r = -0.235, = 0.017). In the entire cohort, sLRP1 levels at enrollment and 6 months later correlated with 13 and 6 pro- and antiinflammatory biomarkers, respectively. In JIA categories, sLRP1 correlations with inflammatory markers were significant in rheumatoid factor-negative polyarticular JIA, oligoarticular JIA, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis at enrollment. Higher sLRP1 levels at enrollment increased the likelihood of absence of active joints 6 months later.

Conclusion: Plasma sLRP1 levels correlate with clinical and biomarker indicators of short-term improvement in JIA disease activity, supporting sLRP1 as an upstream biomarker of potential utility for assessing JIA disease activity and outcome prediction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.200391DOI Listing
May 2021

Associations of clinical and inflammatory biomarker clusters with juvenile idiopathic arthritis categories.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2020 05;59(5):1066-1075

Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto and the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto.

Objective: To identify discrete clusters comprising clinical features and inflammatory biomarkers in children with JIA and to determine cluster alignment with JIA categories.

Methods: A Canadian prospective inception cohort comprising 150 children with JIA was evaluated at baseline (visit 1) and after six months (visit 2). Data included clinical manifestations and inflammation-related biomarkers. Probabilistic principal component analysis identified sets of composite variables, or principal components, from 191 original variables. To discern new clinical-biomarker clusters (clusters), Gaussian mixture models were fit to the data. Newly-defined clusters and JIA categories were compared. Agreement between the two was assessed using Kruskal-Wallis analyses and contingency plots.

Results: Three principal components recovered 35% (three clusters) and 40% (five clusters) of the variance in patient profiles in visits 1 and 2, respectively. None of the clusters aligned precisely with any of the seven JIA categories but rather spanned multiple categories. Results demonstrated that the newly defined clinical-biomarker lustres are more homogeneous than JIA categories.

Conclusion: Applying unsupervised data mining to clinical and inflammatory biomarker data discerns discrete clusters that intersect multiple JIA categories. Results suggest that certain groups of patients within different JIA categories are more aligned pathobiologically than their separate clinical categorizations suggest. Applying data mining analyses to complex datasets can generate insights into JIA pathogenesis and could contribute to biologically based refinements in JIA classification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kez382DOI Listing
May 2020

Clinical and associated inflammatory biomarker features predictive of short-term outcomes in non-systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2020 09;59(9):2402-2411

Department of PediatricsUniversity of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.

Objective: To identify early predictors of disease activity at 18 months in JIA using clinical and biomarker profiling.

Methods: Clinical and biomarker data were collected at JIA diagnosis in a prospective longitudinal inception cohort of 82 children with non-systemic JIA, and their ability to predict an active joint count of 0, a physician global assessment of disease activity of ≤1 cm, and inactive disease by Wallace 2004 criteria 18 months later was assessed. Correlation-based feature selection and ReliefF were used to shortlist predictors and random forest models were trained to predict outcomes.

Results: From the original 112 features, 13 effectively predicted 18-month outcomes. They included age, number of active/effused joints, wrist, ankle and/or knee involvement, ESR, ANA positivity and plasma levels of five inflammatory biomarkers (IL-10, IL-17, IL-12p70, soluble low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and vitamin D), at enrolment. The clinical plus biomarker panel predicted active joint count = 0, physician global assessment ≤ 1, and inactive disease after 18 months with 0.79, 0.80 and 0.83 accuracy and 0.84, 0.83, 0.88 area under the curve, respectively. Using clinical features alone resulted in 0.75, 0.72 and 0.80 accuracy, and area under the curve values of 0.81, 0.78 and 0.83, respectively.

Conclusion: A panel of five plasma biomarkers combined with clinical features at the time of diagnosis more accurately predicted short-term disease activity in JIA than clinical characteristics alone. If validated in external cohorts, such a panel may guide more rationally conceived, biologically based, personalized treatment strategies in early JIA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kez615DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7449798PMC
September 2020

Growth and weight gain in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results from the ReACCh-Out cohort.

Pediatr Rheumatol Online J 2017 Aug 22;15(1):68. Epub 2017 Aug 22.

From British Columbia Children's Hospital and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Background: With modern treatments, the effect of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) on growth may be less than previously reported. Our objective was to describe height, weight and body mass index (BMI) development in a contemporary JIA inception cohort.

Methods: Canadian children newly-diagnosed with JIA 2005-2010 had weight and height measurements every 6 months for 2 years, then yearly up to 5 years. These measurements were used to calculate mean age- and sex-standardized Z-scores, and estimate prevalence and cumulative incidence of growth impairments, and the impact of disease activity and corticosteroids on growth.

Results: One thousand one hundred forty seven children were followed for median 35.5 months. Mean Z-scores, and the point prevalence of short stature (height < 2.5th percentile, 2.5% to 3.4%) and obesity (BMI > 95th percentile, 15.8% to 16.4%) remained unchanged in the whole cohort. Thirty-three children (2.9%) developed new-onset short stature, while 27 (2.4%) developed tall stature (>97.5th percentile). Children with systemic arthritis (n = 77) had an estimated 3-year cumulative incidence of 9.3% (95%CI: 4.3-19.7) for new-onset short stature and 34.4% (23-49.4) for obesity. Most children (81.7%) received no systemic corticosteroids, but 1 mg/Kg/day prednisone-equivalent maintained for 6 months corresponded to a drop of 0.64 height Z-scores (0.56-0.82) and an increase of 0.74 BMI Z-scores (0.56-0.92). An increase of 1 in the 10-cm physician global assessment of disease activity maintained for 6 months corresponded to a drop of 0.01 height Z-scores (0-0.02).

Conclusions: Most children in this modern JIA cohort grew and gained weight as children in the general population. About 1 in 10 children who had systemic arthritis, uncontrolled disease and/or prolonged corticosteroid use, had increased risk of growth impairment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12969-017-0196-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5567720PMC
August 2017

The risk and nature of flares in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results from the ReACCh-Out cohort.

Ann Rheum Dis 2016 06 18;75(6):1092-8. Epub 2015 May 18.

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke and Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.

Objective: To describe probabilities and characteristics of disease flares in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and to identify clinical features associated with an increased risk of flare.

Methods: We studied children in the Research in Arthritis in Canadian Children emphasizing Outcomes (ReACCh-Out) prospective inception cohort. A flare was defined as a recurrence of disease manifestations after attaining inactive disease and was called significant if it required intensification of treatment. Probability of first flare was calculated with Kaplan-Meier methods, and associated features were identified using Cox regression.

Results: 1146 children were followed up a median of 24 months after attaining inactive disease. We observed 627 first flares (54.7% of patients) with median active joint count of 1, physician global assessment (PGA) of 12 mm and duration of 27 weeks. Within a year after attaining inactive disease, the probability of flare was 42.5% (95% CI 39% to 46%) for any flare and 26.6% (24% to 30%) for a significant flare. Within a year after stopping treatment, it was 31.7% (28% to 36%) and 25.0% (21% to 29%), respectively. A maximum PGA >30 mm, maximum active joint count >4, rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive polyarthritis, antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and receiving disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) or biological agents before attaining inactive disease were associated with increased risk of flare. Systemic JIA was associated with the lowest risk of flare.

Conclusions: In this real-practice JIA cohort, flares were frequent, usually involved a few swollen joints for an average of 6 months and 60% led to treatment intensification. Children with a severe disease course had an increased risk of flare.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-207164DOI Listing
June 2016

The outcomes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children managed with contemporary treatments: results from the ReACCh-Out cohort.

Ann Rheum Dis 2015 Oct 19;74(10):1854-60. Epub 2014 May 19.

The Stollery Children's Hospital and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

Objective: To describe clinical outcomes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in a prospective inception cohort of children managed with contemporary treatments.

Methods: Children newly diagnosed with JIA at 16 Canadian paediatric rheumatology centres from 2005 to 2010 were included. Kaplan-Meier survival curves for each JIA category were used to estimate probability of ever attaining an active joint count of 0, inactive disease (no active joints, no extraarticular manifestations and a physician global assessment of disease activity <10 mm), disease remission (inactive disease >12 months after discontinuing treatment) and of receiving specific treatments.

Results: In a cohort of 1104 children, the probabilities of attaining an active joint count of 0 exceeded 78% within 2 years in all JIA categories. The probability of attaining inactive disease exceeded 70% within 2 years in all categories, except for RF-positive polyarthritis (48%). The probability of discontinuing treatment at least once was 67% within 5 years. The probability of attaining remission within 5 years was 46-57% across JIA categories except for polyarthritis (0% RF-positive, 14% RF-negative). Initial treatment included joint injections and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for oligoarthritis, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for polyarthritis and systemic corticosteroids for systemic JIA.

Conclusions: Most children with JIA managed with contemporary treatments attain inactive disease within 2 years of diagnosis and many are able to discontinue treatment. The probability of attaining remission within 5 years of diagnosis is about 50%, except for children with polyarthritis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-205372DOI Listing
October 2015

Access to biologic therapies in Canada for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

J Rheumatol 2012 Sep 1;39(9):1875-9. Epub 2012 Aug 1.

McGill University, and Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children's Hospital, 2300 Rue Tupper, Montreal, Quebec H3H 1P3, Canada.

Objective: To compare access to biologic therapies for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) across Canada, and to identify differences in provincial regulations and criteria for access.

Methods: Between June and August 2010, we compiled the provincial guidelines for reimbursement of biologic drugs for children with JIA and conducted a multicenter Canada-wide survey of pediatric rheumatologists to determine their experience with accessing biologic therapies for their patients.

Results: There were significant difficulties accessing biologic treatments other than etanercept and abatacept for children. There were large discrepancies in the access criteria and coverage of biologic agents across provinces, notably with age restrictions for younger children.

Conclusion: Canadian children with JIA may not receive optimal internationally recognized "standard" care because pediatric coverage for biologic drugs through provincial formularies is limited and inconsistent across the country. There is urgent need for public policy to improve access to biologic therapies for these children to ensure optimal short-term and longterm health outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.120089DOI Listing
September 2012

Early outcomes and improvement of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis enrolled in a Canadian multicenter inception cohort.

Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2010 Apr;62(4):527-36

University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Objective: To determine early outcomes and early improvements in a prospective inception cohort of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) treated with current standard therapies.

Methods: Patients selected were enrolled in an inception cohort of JIA, the Research in Arthritis in Canadian Children Emphasizing Outcomes Study. The juvenile rheumatoid arthritis core criteria set measures were completed at enrollment and 6 months later. Frequencies of normal values for each of the core set measures and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Pediatric 30, 50, and 70 (Pedi 70) criteria response rates achieved at 6 months after enrollment were calculated for each JIA-onset subtype group.

Results: Among 354 patients in the study, the median interval between diagnosis and enrollment was 0.7 months. At 6 months after enrollment, median values of active joint counts were highest in patients with rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive polyarthritis (4) and RF-negative polyarthritis (2), but were 0 or 1 for other subtypes. Fifty percent or more of patients with oligoarthritis, systemic arthritis, enthesitis-related arthritis, and undifferentiated arthritis had no active joints, and the ACR Pedi 70 criteria response rate was 48% or more in those with oligoarthritis, RF-negative polyarthritis, and systemic arthritis.

Conclusion: With current management strategies in clinical practice, improvement in disease activity was noted in considerable proportions of patients in all of the JIA subtype groups, but low levels of disease activity persisted in many. We expect that these early outcomes will prove to be significant predictors of long-term outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.20044DOI Listing
April 2010

Predictors of early inactive disease in a juvenile idiopathic arthritis cohort: results of a Canadian multicenter, prospective inception cohort study.

Arthritis Rheum 2009 Aug;61(8):1077-86

University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Objective: To determine early predictors of 6-month outcomes in a prospective cohort of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

Methods: Patients selected were those enrolled in an inception cohort study of JIA, the Research in Arthritis in Canadian Children Emphasizing Outcomes Study, within 6 months after diagnosis. The juvenile rheumatoid arthritis core criteria set and quality of life measures were collected at enrollment and 6 months later. Outcomes evaluated included inactive disease, Juvenile Arthritis Quality of Life Questionnaire (JAQQ) scores, and Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (C-HAQ) scores at 6 months.

Results: Thirty-three percent of patients had inactive disease at 6 months. Onset subtype and most baseline core criteria set measures correlated with all 3 outcomes. Relative to oligoarticular JIA, the risks of inactive disease were lower for enthesitis-related arthritis, polyarthritis rheumatoid factor (RF)-negative JIA, and polyarthritis RF-positive JIA, and were similar for psoriatic arthritis. In multiple regression analyses, the baseline JAQQ score was an independent predictor of all 3 outcomes. Other independent baseline predictors included polyarthritis RF-negative and systemic JIA for inactive disease; C-HAQ score and polyarthritis RF-positive JIA for the 6-month C-HAQ score; and active joint count, pain, and time to diagnosis for the 6-month JAQQ score.

Conclusion: Clinical measures soon after diagnosis predict short-term outcomes for patients with JIA. The JAQQ is a predictor of multiple outcomes. Time to diagnosis affects quality of life in the short term.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.24539DOI Listing
August 2009
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