Publications by authors named "Anne Tjonneland"

1,104 Publications

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Long-term exposure to low-level ambient air pollution and incidence of stroke and coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of six European cohorts within the ELAPSE project.

Lancet Planet Health 2021 Sep;5(9):e620-e632

Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, but evidence is unclear on the health effects of exposure to pollutant concentrations lower than current EU and US standards and WHO guideline limits. Within the multicentre study Effects of Low-Level Air Pollution: A Study in Europe (ELAPSE), we investigated the associations of long-term exposures to fine particulate matter (PM), nitrogen dioxide (NO), black carbon, and warm-season ozone (O) with the incidence of stroke and acute coronary heart disease.

Methods: We did a pooled analysis of individual data from six population-based cohort studies within ELAPSE, from Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Germany (recruited 1992-2004), and harmonised individual and area-level variables between cohorts. Participants (all adults) were followed up until migration from the study area, death, or incident stroke or coronary heart disease, or end of follow-up (2011-15). Mean 2010 air pollution concentrations from centrally developed European-wide land use regression models were assigned to participants' baseline residential addresses. We used Cox proportional hazards models with increasing levels of covariate adjustment to investigate the association of air pollution exposure with incidence of stroke and coronary heart disease. We assessed the shape of the concentration-response function and did subset analyses of participants living at pollutant concentrations lower than predefined values.

Findings: From the pooled ELAPSE cohorts, data on 137 148 participants were analysed in our fully adjusted model. During a median follow-up of 17·2 years (IQR 13·8-19·5), we observed 6950 incident events of stroke and 10 071 incident events of coronary heart disease. Incidence of stroke was associated with PM (hazard ratio 1·10 [95% CI 1·01-1·21] per 5 μg/m increase), NO (1·08 [1·04-1·12] per 10 μg/m increase), and black carbon (1·06 [1·02-1·10] per 0·5 10/m increase), whereas coronary heart disease incidence was only associated with NO (1·04 [1·01-1·07]). Warm-season O was not associated with an increase in either outcome. Concentration-response curves indicated no evidence of a threshold below which air pollutant concentrations are not harmful for cardiovascular health. Effect estimates for PM and NO remained elevated even when restricting analyses to participants exposed to pollutant concentrations lower than the EU limit values of 25 μg/m for PM and 40 μg/m for NO.

Interpretation: Long-term air pollution exposure was associated with incidence of stroke and coronary heart disease, even at pollutant concentrations lower than current limit values.

Funding: Health Effects Institute.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2542-5196(21)00195-9DOI Listing
September 2021

Long term exposure to low level air pollution and mortality in eight European cohorts within the ELAPSE project: pooled analysis.

BMJ 2021 09 1;374:n1904. Epub 2021 Sep 1.

Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Objective: To investigate the associations between air pollution and mortality, focusing on associations below current European Union, United States, and World Health Organization standards and guidelines.

Design: Pooled analysis of eight cohorts.

Setting: Multicentre project Effects of Low-Level Air Pollution: A Study in Europe (ELAPSE) in six European countries.

Participants: 325 367 adults from the general population recruited mostly in the 1990s or 2000s with detailed lifestyle data. Stratified Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyse the associations between air pollution and mortality. Western Europe-wide land use regression models were used to characterise residential air pollution concentrations of ambient fine particulate matter (PM), nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and black carbon.

Main Outcome Measures: Deaths due to natural causes and cause specific mortality.

Results: Of 325 367 adults followed-up for an average of 19.5 years, 47 131 deaths were observed. Higher exposure to PM, nitrogen dioxide, and black carbon was associated with significantly increased risk of almost all outcomes. An increase of 5 µg/m in PM was associated with 13% (95% confidence interval 10.6% to 15.5%) increase in natural deaths; the corresponding figure for a 10 µg/m increase in nitrogen dioxide was 8.6% (7% to 10.2%). Associations with PM, nitrogen dioxide, and black carbon remained significant at low concentrations. For participants with exposures below the US standard of 12 µg/m an increase of 5 µg/m in PM was associated with 29.6% (14% to 47.4%) increase in natural deaths.

Conclusions: Our study contributes to the evidence that outdoor air pollution is associated with mortality even at low pollution levels below the current European and North American standards and WHO guideline values. These findings are therefore an important contribution to the debate about revision of air quality limits, guidelines, and standards, and future assessments by the Global Burden of Disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1904DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8409282PMC
September 2021

Consumption of ultra-processed foods associated with weight gain and obesity in adults: A multi-national cohort study.

Clin Nutr 2021 Sep 21;40(9):5079-5088. Epub 2021 Aug 21.

Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública (EASP), Granada, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.

Background: There is a worldwide shift towards increased consumption of ultra-processed foods (UPF) with concurrent rising prevalence of obesity. We examined the relationship between the consumption of UPF and weight gain and risk of obesity.

Methods: This prospective cohort included 348 748 men and women aged 25-70 years. Participants were recruited between 1992 and 2000 from 9 European countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Two body weight measures were available, at baseline and after a median follow-up time of 5 years. Foods and drinks were assessed at baseline by dietary questionnaires and classified according to their degree of processing using NOVA classification. Multilevel mixed linear regression was used to estimate the association between UPF consumption and body weight change (kg/5 years). To estimate the relative risk of becoming overweight or obese after 5 years we used Poisson regression stratified according to baseline body mass index (BMI).

Results: After multivariable adjustment, higher UPF consumption (per 1 SD increment) was positively associated with weight gain (0·12 kg/5 years, 95% CI 0·09 to 0·15). Comparing highest vs. lowest quintile of UPF consumption was associated with a 15% greater risk (95% CI 1·11, 1·19) of becoming overweight or obese in normal weight participants, and with a 16% greater risk (95% CI 1·09, 1·23) of becoming obese in participants who were overweight at baseline.

Conclusions: These results are supportive of public health campaigns to substitute UPF for less processed alternatives for obesity prevention and weight management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2021.08.009DOI Listing
September 2021

Polyphenol Intake and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study.

Antioxidants (Basel) 2021 Aug 4;10(8). Epub 2021 Aug 4.

Institut Gustave Roussy, 94805 Villejuif, France.

Despite some epidemiological evidence on the protective effects of polyphenol intake on epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk from case-control studies, the evidence is scarce from prospective studies and non-existent for several polyphenol classes. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the associations between the intake of total, classes and subclasses of polyphenols and EOC risk in a large prospective study. The study was conducted in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, which included 309,129 adult women recruited mostly from the general population. Polyphenol intake was assessed through validated country-specific dietary questionnaires and the Phenol-Explorer database. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 1469 first incident EOC cases (including 806 serous, 129 endometrioid, 102 mucinous, and 67 clear cell tumours) were identified. In multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models, the hazard ratio in the highest quartile of total polyphenol intake compared with the lowest quartile (HR) was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94-1.39; -trend = 0.11). Similarly, the intake of most classes and subclasses of polyphenols were not related to either overall EOC risk or any EOC subtype. A borderline statistically significant positive association was observed between phenolic acid intake (HR = 1.20, 95% CI 1.01-1.43; -trend = 0.02) and EOC risk, especially for the serous subtype and in women with obesity, although these associations did not exceed the Bonferroni correction threshold. The current results do not support any association between polyphenol intake and EOC in our large European prospective study. Results regarding phenolic acid intake need further investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antiox10081249DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8389235PMC
August 2021

Vitamin K Intake and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in the Danish Diet Cancer and Health Study.

J Am Heart Assoc 2021 Aug 7;10(16):e020551. Epub 2021 Aug 7.

Institute for Nutrition Research School of Medical and Health Sciences Edith Cowan University Perth Australia.

Background Dietary vitamin K (K and K) may reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk via several mechanisms. However, studies linking vitamin K intake with incident ASCVD are limited. We aimed to determine the relationship between dietary vitamin K intake and ASCVD hospitalizations. Methods and Results In this prospective cohort study, participants from the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study, with no prior ASCVD, completed a food-frequency questionnaire at baseline and were followed up for hospital admissions of ASCVD; ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, or peripheral artery disease. Intakes of vitamin K and vitamin K were estimated from the food-frequency questionnaire, and their relationship with ASCVD hospitalizations was determined using Cox proportional hazards models. Among 53 372 Danish citizens with a median (interquartile range) age of 56 (52-60) years, 8726 individuals were hospitalized for any ASCVD during 21 (17-22) years of follow-up. Compared with participants with the lowest vitamin K intakes, participants with the highest intakes had a 21% lower risk of an ASCVD-related hospitalization (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% CI: 0.74-0.84), after multivariable adjustments for relevant demographic covariates. Likewise for vitamin K, the risk of an ASCVD-related hospitalization for participants with the highest intakes was 14% lower than participants with the lowest vitamin K intake (hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.81-0.91). Conclusions Risk of ASCVD was inversely associated with diets high in vitamin K or K. The similar inverse associations with both vitamin K and K, despite very different dietary sources, highlight the potential importance of vitamin K for ASCVD prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.120.020551DOI Listing
August 2021

Higher Habitual Flavonoid Intakes Are Associated With A Lower Incidence Of Diabetes.

J Nutr 2021 Jul 27. Epub 2021 Jul 27.

Institute for Nutrition Research, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.

Background: Higher flavonoid intakes are hypothesised to confer protection against type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Objective: We aimed to 1) investigate associations between flavonoid intakes and diabetes, 2) examine the mediating impact of body fat, and 3) identify subpopulations that may receive the greatest benefit from higher flavonoid intakes in participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study followed-up for 23 years.

Design: Cross-sectional associations between baseline flavonoid intake, estimated using food frequency questionnaires and the Phenol Explorer database, and body fat estimated by bioelectrical impedance, were assessed using multivariable-adjusted linear regression models. Non-linear associations between flavonoid intake and incident diabetes were examined using restricted cubic splines with multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models.

Results: Among 54,787 participants (median [IQR] age of 56 [52-60] years; (47.3%) men), 6700 individuals were diagnosed with diabetes. Participants in the highest total flavonoid intake quintile (median, 1,202 mg/d) had a 1.52 kg lower body fat (95%CI: -1.74, -1.30) and a 19% lower risk of diabetes [hazard ratio (95%CI): 0.81 (0.75, 0.87)] after multivariable adjustments and compared to participants in the lowest intake quintile (median, 174 mg/d). Body fat mediated 57% (95% CI: 42%, 83%) of the association between flavonoid intake and incident diabetes. Of the flavonoid subclasses, moderate to high intakes of flavonols, flavanol monomers, flavanol oligo + polymers, and anthocyanins were significantly associated with a lower risk of diabetes. While associations were not modified by sex, smoking status, BMI or physical activity (pinteraction > 0.05 for all), findings on an absolute scale suggest that those at a higher risk (those with obesity) may benefit the most from a higher flavonoid intake.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that a diet abundant in flavonoid-rich foods may help to ameliorate diabetes risk, in part through a reduction in body fat.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxab269DOI Listing
July 2021

Long-term exposure to air pollution and liver cancer incidence in six European cohorts.

Int J Cancer 2021 Jul 18. Epub 2021 Jul 18.

Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Particulate matter air pollution and diesel engine exhaust have been classified as carcinogenic for lung cancer, yet few studies have explored associations with liver cancer. We used six European adult cohorts which were recruited between 1985 and 2005, pooled within the "Effects of low-level air pollution: A study in Europe" (ELAPSE) project, and followed for the incidence of liver cancer until 2011 to 2015. The annual average exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO ), particulate matter with diameter <2.5 μm (PM ), black carbon (BC), warm-season ozone (O ), and eight elemental components of PM (copper, iron, zinc, sulfur, nickel, vanadium, silicon, and potassium) were estimated by European-wide hybrid land-use regression models at participants' residential addresses. We analyzed the association between air pollution and liver cancer incidence by Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for potential confounders. Of 330 064 cancer-free adults at baseline, 512 developed liver cancer during a mean follow-up of 18.1 years. We observed positive linear associations between NO (hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.02-1.35 per 10 μg/m ), PM (1.12, 0.92-1.36 per 5 μg/m ), and BC (1.15, 1.00-1.33 per 0.5 10 /m) and liver cancer incidence. Associations with NO and BC persisted in two-pollutant models with PM . Most components of PM were associated with the risk of liver cancer, with the strongest associations for sulfur and vanadium, which were robust to adjustment for PM or NO . Our study suggests that ambient air pollution may increase the risk of liver cancer, even at concentrations below current EU standards.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33743DOI Listing
July 2021

Plasma concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and pancreatic cancer risk.

Int J Epidemiol 2021 Jul 14. Epub 2021 Jul 14.

Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, "Civic-M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Ragusa, Italy.

Background: Findings and limitations of previous studies on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and pancreatic cancer risk support conducting further research in prospective cohorts.

Methods: We conducted a prospective case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Participants were 513 pancreatic cancer cases and 1020 matched controls. Concentrations of 22 POPs were measured in plasma collected at baseline.

Results: Some associations were observed at higher concentrations of p, p'-DDT, trans-nonachlor, β-hexachlorocyclohexane and the sum of six organochlorine pesticides and of 16 POPs. The odds ratio (OR) for the upper quartile of trans-nonachlor was 1.55 (95% confidence interval 1.06-2.26; P for trend = 0.025). Associations were stronger in the groups predefined as most valid (participants having fasted >6 h, with microscopic diagnostic confirmation, normal weight, and never smokers), and as most relevant (follow-up ≥10 years). Among participants having fasted >6 h, the ORs were relevant for 10 of 11 exposures. Higher ORs were also observed among cases with microscopic confirmation than in cases with a clinical diagnosis, and among normal-weight participants than in the rest of participants. Among participants with a follow-up ≥10 years, estimates were higher than in participants with a shorter follow-up (for trans-nonachlor: OR = 2.14, 1.01 to 4.53, P for trend = 0.035). Overall, trans-nonachlor, three PCBs and the two sums of POPs were the exposures most clearly associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

Conclusions: Individually or in combination, most of the 22 POPs analysed did not or only moderately increased the risk of pancreatic cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyab115DOI Listing
July 2021

Obesity is Associated With Increased Risk of Crohn's disease, but not Ulcerative Colitis: A Pooled Analysis of Five Prospective Cohort Studies.

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2021 Jul 7. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Background And Aims: It is unclear whether obesity is associated with the development of inflammatory bowel disease despite compelling data from basic science studies. We therefore examined the association between obesity and risk of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC).

Methods: We conducted pooled analyses of 5 prospective cohorts with validated anthropometric measurements for body mass index (BMI) and waist-hip ratio and other lifestyle factors. Diagnoses of CD and UC were confirmed through medical records or ascertained using validated definitions. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling to calculate pooled multivariable-adjusted HRs (aHRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Results: Among 601,009 participants (age range, 18-98 years) with 10,110,018 person-years of follow-up, we confirmed 563 incident cases of CD and 1047 incident cases of UC. Obesity (baseline BMI ≥30 kg/m) was associated with an increased risk of CD (pooled aHR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.05-1.71, I = 0%) compared with normal BMI (18.5 to <25 kg/m). Each 5 kg/m increment in baseline BMI was associated with a 16% increase in risk of CD (pooled aHR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.22; I = 0%). Similarly, with each 5 kg/m increment in early adulthood BMI (age, 18-20 years), there was a 22% increase in risk of CD (pooled aHR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.05-1.40; I = 13.6%). An increase in waist-hip ratio was associated with an increased risk of CD that did not reach statistical significance (pooled aHR across quartiles, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.97-1.19; I = 0%). No associations were observed between measures of obesity and risk of UC.

Conclusions: In an adult population, obesity as measured by BMI was associated with an increased risk of older-onset CD but not UC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2021.06.049DOI Listing
July 2021

Prothrombotic genotypes and risk of venous thromboembolism in occult cancer.

Thromb Res 2021 Sep 1;205:17-23. Epub 2021 Jul 1.

Thrombosis Research Center (TREC), Department of Clinical Medicine, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.

Background: Studies have reported that the combination of some prothrombotic genotypes and overt cancer yields a synergistic effect on VTE risk. Whether individual prothrombotic genotypes or number of risk alleles in a genetic risk score (GRS) affect VTE risk in occult cancer have not been addressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the joint effect of five prothrombotic genotypes and occult cancer on VTE risk.

Methods: Cases with incident VTE (n = 1566) and a subcohort (n = 14,537) were sampled from the Scandinavian Thrombosis and Cancer Cohort (1993-2012). Five single nucleotide polymorphisms previously reported in a GRS were genotyped: ABO (rs8176719), F5 (rs6025), F2 (rs1799963), FGG (rs2066865) and F11 (rs2036914). Hazard ratios (HRs) for VTE by individual SNPs and GRS were estimated according to non-cancer and occult cancer (one year preceding a cancer diagnosis) exposure.

Results: Occult cancer occurred in 1817 subjects, and of these, 93 experienced a VTE. The VTE risk was 4-fold higher (HR 4.05, 95% CI 3.28-5.00) in subjects with occult cancer compared with those without cancer. Among subjects with occult cancer, those with VTE had a higher proportion of prothrombotic and advanced cancers than those without VTE. The VTE risk increased according to individual prothrombotic genotypes and GRS in cancer-free subjects, while no such effect was observed in subjects with occult cancer (HR for ≥4 versus ≤1 risk alleles in GRS: 1.14, 95% CI 0.61-2.11).

Conclusions: Five well-established prothrombotic genotypes, individually or combined, were not associated with increased risk of VTE in individuals with occult cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2021.06.019DOI Listing
September 2021

Inflammatory potential of the diet and risk of breast cancer in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

Eur J Epidemiol 2021 Jun 20. Epub 2021 Jun 20.

Director Office, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France.

The role of chronic inflammation on breast cancer (BC) risk remains unclear beyond as an underlying mechanism of obesity and physical activity. We aimed to evaluate the association between the inflammatory potential of the diet and risk of BC overall, according to menopausal status and tumour subtypes. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, 318,686 women were followed for 14 years, among whom 13,246 incident BC cases were identified. The inflammatory potential of the diet was characterized by an inflammatory score of the diet (ISD). Multivariable Cox regression models were used to assess the potential effect of the ISD on BC risk by means of hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). ISD was positively associated with BC risk. Each increase of one standard deviation (1-Sd) of the score increased by 4% the risk of BC (HR = 1.04; 95% CI 1.01-1.07). Women in the highest quintile of the ISD (indicating a most pro-inflammatory diet) had a 12% increase in risk compared with those in the lowest quintile (HR = 1.12; 95% CI 1.04-1.21) with a significant trend. The association was strongest among premenopausal women, with an 8% increased risk for 1-Sd increase in the score (HR = 1.08; 95% CI 1.01-1.14). The pattern of the association was quite homogeneous by BC subtypes based on hormone receptor status. There were no significant interactions between ISD and body mass index, physical activity, or alcohol consumption. Women consuming more pro-inflammatory diets as measured by ISD are at increased risk for BC, especially premenopausal women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10654-021-00772-2DOI Listing
June 2021

Associations between dietary amino acid intakes and blood concentration levels.

Clin Nutr 2021 06 27;40(6):3772-3779. Epub 2021 Apr 27.

International Agency for Research on Cancer, Nutrition and Metabolism Section, 69372, Lyon CEDEX 08, France.

Background And Aims: Emerging evidence suggests a role of amino acids (AAs) in the development of various diseases including renal failure, liver cirrhosis, diabetes and cancer. However, mechanistic pathways and the effects of dietary AA intakes on circulating levels and disease outcomes are unclear. We aimed to compare protein and AA intakes, with their respective blood concentrations in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

Methods: Dietary protein and AA intakes were assessed via the EPIC dietary questionnaires (DQ) and 24-h dietary recalls (24-HDR). A subsample of 3768 EPIC participants who were free of cancer had blood AA concentrations measured. To investigate how circulating levels relate to their respective intakes, dietary AA intake was examined in quintiles and ANOVA tests were run. Pearson correlations were examined for continous associations between intakes and blood concentrations.

Results: Dietary AA intakes (assessed with the DQ) and blood AA concentrations were not strongly correlated (-0.15 ≤ r ≤ 0.17) and the direction of the correlations depended on AA class: weak positive correlations were found for most essential AAs (isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine) and conditionally essential AAs (arginine and tyrosine), while negative associations were found for non-essential AAs. Similar results were found when using the 24-HDR. When conducting ANOVA tests for essential AAs, higher intake quintiles were linked to higher blood AA concentrations, except for histidine and phenylalanine. For non-essential AAs and glycine, an inverse relationship was observed. Conditionally-essential AAs showed mixed results.

Conclusions: Weak positive correlations and dose responses were found between most essential and conditionally essential AA intakes, and blood concentrations, but not for the non-essential AAs. These results suggest that intake of dietary AA might be related to physiological AA status, particularly for the essential AAs. However, these results should be further evaluated and confirmed in large-scale prospective studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2021.04.036DOI Listing
June 2021

Long-term exposure to low-level air pollution and incidence of asthma: the ELAPSE project.

Eur Respir J 2021 06 4;57(6). Epub 2021 Jun 4.

Dept of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Roskilde, Denmark.

Background: Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution has been linked to childhood-onset asthma, although evidence is still insufficient. Within the multicentre project Effects of Low-Level Air Pollution: A Study in Europe (ELAPSE), we examined the associations of long-term exposures to particulate matter with a diameter <2.5 µm (PM), nitrogen dioxide (NO) and black carbon (BC) with asthma incidence in adults.

Methods: We pooled data from three cohorts in Denmark and Sweden with information on asthma hospital diagnoses. The average concentrations of air pollutants in 2010 were modelled by hybrid land-use regression models at participants' baseline residential addresses. Associations of air pollution exposures with asthma incidence were explored with Cox proportional hazard models, adjusting for potential confounders.

Results: Of 98 326 participants, 1965 developed asthma during a mean follow-up of 16.6 years. We observed associations in fully adjusted models with hazard ratios of 1.22 (95% CI 1.04-1.43) per 5 μg·m for PM, 1.17 (95% CI 1.10-1.25) per 10 µg·m for NO and 1.15 (95% CI 1.08-1.23) per 0.5×10m for BC. Hazard ratios were larger in cohort subsets with exposure levels below the European Union and US limit values and possibly World Health Organization guidelines for PM and NO. NO and BC estimates remained unchanged in two-pollutant models with PM, whereas PM estimates were attenuated to unity. The concentration-response curves showed no evidence of a threshold.

Conclusions: Long-term exposure to air pollution, especially from fossil fuel combustion sources such as motorised traffic, was associated with adult-onset asthma, even at levels below the current limit values.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/13993003.03099-2020DOI Listing
June 2021

Dietary Methyl-Group Donor Intake and Breast Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

Nutrients 2021 May 28;13(6). Epub 2021 May 28.

Office of the Director, International Agency for Research on Cancer, CEDEX 08, 69372 Lyon, France.

(1) Background: Methyl-group donors (MGDs), including folate, choline, betaine, and methionine, may influence breast cancer (BC) risk through their role in one-carbon metabolism; (2) Methods: We studied the relationship between dietary intakes of MGDs and BC risk, adopting data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort; (3) Results: 318,686 pre- and postmenopausal women were followed between enrolment in 1992-2000 and December 2013-December 2015. Dietary MGD intakes were estimated at baseline through food-frequency questionnaires. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to quantify the association between dietary intake of MGDs, measured both as a calculated score based on their sum and individually, and BC risk. Subgroup analyses were performed by hormone receptor status, menopausal status, and level of alcohol intake. During a mean follow-up time of 14.1 years, 13,320 women with malignant BC were identified. No associations were found between dietary intakes of the MGD score or individual MGDs and BC risk. However, a potential U-shaped relationship was observed between dietary folate intake and overall BC risk, suggesting an inverse association for intakes up to 350 µg/day compared to a reference intake of 205 µg/day. No statistically significant differences in the associations were observed by hormone receptor status, menopausal status, or level of alcohol intake; (4) Conclusions: There was no strong evidence for an association between MGDs involved in one-carbon metabolism and BC risk. However, a potential U-shaped trend was suggested for dietary folate intake and BC risk. Further research is needed to clarify this association.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13061843DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8228096PMC
May 2021

Urinary cadmium and stroke - a case-cohort study in Danish never-smokers.

Environ Res 2021 09 29;200:111394. Epub 2021 May 29.

Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Roskilde, Denmark.

Background: and Purpose: Cadmium has been associated with risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke. Human cadmium exposure occurs primarily through diet and tobacco smoke. Recent cohort studies have found an association with stroke, but residual confounding from smoking, could not be ruled out. We therefore conducted a case-cohort study to evaluate whether cadmium is associated with stroke in never-smokers.

Methods: The Danish Diet Cancer and Health cohort consists of Danes 50-64 years old, recruited in 1993-1997. From never-smoking cohort members without previous cancer or stroke we sampled a sub-cohort of 1200 persons. We also identified all (n = 534) cases in the cohort with a validated stroke diagnosis between baseline and 2009. We quantified cadmium and creatinine concentrations from baseline urine samples and used cadmium per creatinine as our main exposure metric. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with age as time scale and adjusting for BMI, education and urinary cotinine with and without stratification by sex.

Results: The median urinary cadmium concentration was 0.21 μg cadmium/g creatinine in cases and 0.19 μg/g in the sub-cohort. The majority (83%) of stroke cases were diagnosed with ischemic stroke. The HR for stroke in the highest quartile of exposure (median 0.44 μg/g creatinine) was 1.11 (95% CI: 0.79-1.54) compared with the lowest quartile (median 0.10 μg/g creatinine). The HR per inter quartile range (IQR, 0.19 μg/g creatinine) was 1.02 (95% CI: 0.92-1.12). Among men, the HR per IQR higher levels of cadmium (0.16 μg/g creatinine) was 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92-1.52), and 1.00 (95% CI: 0.89-1.12) among women. Adjusting for creatinine or using osmolality instead of creatinine standardization generally attenuated observed relationships.

Conclusions: Our results do not support that low levels of cadmium exposure among never-smokers are strongly associated with risk of stroke, although results varied somewhat by sex and method of accounting for urinary dilution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2021.111394DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8403651PMC
September 2021

The association between meat and fish consumption and bladder cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies.

Eur J Epidemiol 2021 Aug 25;36(8):781-792. Epub 2021 May 25.

Department of Complex Genetics and Epidemiology, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University, Universiteitssingel40 (RoomC5.570), 6229 ER, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Evidence on the effects of meat consumption from different sources on the risk of bladder cancer (BC) is limited and controversial. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the associations between meat consumption and BC risk using a pooled data approach. Individual data from 11 prospective cohorts comprising 2848 BC cases and 515,697 non-cases with a total of 5,498,025 person-years of follow-up was pooled and analysed to investigate the potential associations between total red meat and products, red meat, processed meat, poultry and total fish and BC risk. Hazard ratios (HRs), with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were estimated using Cox regression models stratified on cohort. Overall, an increased BC risk was found for high intake of organ meat (HR comparing highest with lowest tertile: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.36, p-trend = 0.03). On the contrary, a marginally inverse association was observed for total fish intake and BC risk among men (HR comparing highest with lowest tertile: 0.79, 95% CI 0.65, 0.97, p-trend = 0.04). No associations were observed for other meat sources. Results of this prospective study suggest that organ meat consumption may be associated with BC development. Replication in large-scale prospective studies and investigation of possible causal mechanisms is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10654-021-00762-4DOI Listing
August 2021

Flavonoid intake and incident dementia in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort.

Alzheimers Dement (N Y) 2021 13;7(1):e12175. Epub 2021 May 13.

School of Medical and Health Sciences Edith Cowan University Perth Australia.

Introduction: Prospective studies investigating flavonoid intake and dementia risk are scarce. The aims of this study were to examine associations between flavonoid intake and the risk of incident dementia and to investigate whether this association differs in the presence of lifestyle risk factors for dementia.

Methods: We examined associations in 55,985 participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study followed for 23 years. The Phenol-Explorer database was used to estimate flavonoid intakes. Information on incident dementia and dementia subtypes was obtained using Danish patient and prescription registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using restricted cubic splines in multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models.

Results: For incident dementia, moderate compared to low intakes of flavonols (HR: 0.90 [0.82, 0.99]), flavanol oligo+polymers (HR: 0.87 [0.79, 0.96]), anthocyanins (HR: 0.84 [0.76, 0.93]), flavanones (HR: 0.89 [0.80, 0.99]), and flavones (HR: 0.85 [0.77, 0.95]) were associated with a lower risk. For vascular dementia, moderate intakes of flavonols (HR: 0.69 [0.53, 0.89]) and flavanol oligo + polymers (HR: 0.65 [0.51, 0.83]) were associated with lower risk. Flavonoid intakes were not significantly associated with Alzheimer's disease or unspecified dementia. The inverse association between total flavonoid intake and incident dementia was stronger in "ever" smokers than in "never" smokers and in those without hypercholesterolemia versus those with hypercholesteremia. Furthermore, the inverse association of vascular dementia with a moderate total flavonoid intake was stronger in "ever" smokers and those who were "normal" to "overweight" versus "never" smokers or those who were "obese," respectively.

Conclusion: A moderate intake of flavonoid-rich foods may help to reduce dementia risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/trc2.12175DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8118115PMC
May 2021

Novel Biomarkers of Habitual Alcohol Intake and Associations with Risk of Pancreatic and Liver Cancers and Liver Disease Mortality.

J Natl Cancer Inst 2021 May 19. Epub 2021 May 19.

Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: Alcohol is an established risk factor for several cancers, but modest alcohol-cancer associations may be missed due to measurement error in self-reported assessments. Biomarkers of habitual alcohol intake may provide novel insight into the relationship between alcohol and cancer risk.

Methods: Untargeted metabolomics was used to identify metabolites correlated with self-reported habitual alcohol intake in a discovery dataset from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC; n = 454). Statistically significant correlations were tested in independent datasets of controls from case-control studies nested within EPIC (n = 280) and the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC; n = 438) study. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations of alcohol-associated metabolites and self-reported alcohol intake with risk of pancreatic cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), liver cancer, and liver disease mortality in the contributing studies.

Results: Two metabolites displayed a dose-response association with self-reported alcohol intake 2-hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid and an unidentified compound. A 1-SD (log2) increase in levels of 2-hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid was associated with risk of HCC (OR = 2.54; 95% CI = 1.51-4.27) and pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.43; 95% CI = 1.03-1.99) in EPIC and liver cancer (OR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.44-2.77) and liver disease mortality (OR = 2.16; 95% CI = 1.63-2.86) in ATBC. Conversely, a 1-SD (log2) increase in questionnaire-derived alcohol intake was not associated with HCC or pancreatic cancer in EPIC or liver cancer in ATBC but was associated with liver disease mortality (OR = 2.19; 95% CI = 1.60-2.98) in ATBC.

Conclusions: 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid is a candidate biomarker of habitual alcohol intake that may advance the study of alcohol and cancer risk in population-based studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djab078DOI Listing
May 2021

Habitual flavonoid intake and ischemic stroke incidence in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Cohort.

Am J Clin Nutr 2021 07;114(1):348-357

School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia.

Background: Flavonoid-rich foods have antiinflammatory, antiatherogenic, and antithrombotic properties that may contribute to a lower risk of ischemic stroke.

Objectives: We aimed to investigate the relationship between habitual flavonoid consumption and incidence of ischemic stroke in participants from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study.

Design: In this prospective cohort study, 55,169 Danish residents without a prior ischemic stroke [median (IQR) age at enrolment of 56 y (52-60)], were followed for 21 y (20-22). We used Phenol-Explorer to estimate flavonoid intake from food frequency questionnaires obtained at study entry. Incident cases of ischemic stroke were identified from Danish nationwide registries and restricted cubic splines in Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate relationships with flavonoid intake.

Results: During follow-up, 4237 individuals experienced an ischemic stroke. Compared with participants in Q1 and after multivariable adjustment for demographics and lifestyle factors, those in Q5-for intake of total flavonoids, flavonols, and flavanol oligo + polymers-had a 12% [HR (95% CI): 0.88 (0.81, 0.96)], 10% [0.90 (0.82, 0.98)], and 18% [0.82 (0.75, 0.89)] lower risk of ischemic stroke incidence, respectively. Multivariable (demographic and lifestyle) adjusted associations for anthocyanins and flavones with risk of ischemic stroke were not linear, with moderate but not higher intakes associated with lower risk [anthocyanins Q3 vs. Q1 HR (95% CI): 0.85 (0.79, 0.93); flavones: 0.90 (0.84, 0.97)]. Following additional adjustment for dietary confounders, similar point estimates were observed; however, significance was only retained for anthocyanins and flavanol oligo + polymers [anthocyanins Q3 vs. Q1 HR (95% CI): 0.86 (0.79, 0.94); flavanol oligo + polymers Q5 vs. Q1 0.86 (0.78, 0.94)].

Conclusions: These findings suggest that moderate habitual consumption of healthy flavonoid-rich foods is associated with a lower risk of ischemic stroke and further investigation is therefore warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab138DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8246625PMC
July 2021

Metabolic signatures of greater body size and their associations with risk of colorectal and endometrial cancers in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

BMC Med 2021 Apr 30;19(1):101. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France.

Background: The mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer relationship are incompletely understood. This study aimed to characterise metabolic signatures of greater body size and to investigate their association with two obesity-related malignancies, endometrial and colorectal cancers, and with weight loss within the context of an intervention study.

Methods: Targeted mass spectrometry metabolomics data from 4326 participants enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort and 17 individuals from a single-arm pilot weight loss intervention (Intercept) were used in this analysis. Metabolic signatures of body size were first determined in discovery (N = 3029) and replication (N = 1297) sets among EPIC participants by testing the associations between 129 metabolites and body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) using linear regression models followed by partial least squares analyses. Conditional logistic regression models assessed the associations between the metabolic signatures with endometrial (N = 635 cases and 648 controls) and colorectal (N = 423 cases and 423 controls) cancer risk using nested case-control studies in EPIC. Pearson correlation between changes in the metabolic signatures and weight loss was tested among Intercept participants.

Results: After adjustment for multiple comparisons, greater BMI, WC, and WHR were associated with higher levels of valine, isoleucine, glutamate, PC aa C38:3, and PC aa C38:4 and with lower levels of asparagine, glutamine, glycine, serine, lysoPC C17:0, lysoPC C18:1, lysoPC C18:2, PC aa C42:0, PC ae C34:3, PC ae C40:5, and PC ae C42:5. The metabolic signature of BMI (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.30-1.74), WC (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.27-1.69), and WHR (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.33-1.79) were each associated with endometrial cancer risk. Risk of colorectal cancer was positively associated with the metabolic signature of WHR (OR: 1.26, 95% CI 1.07-1.49). In the Intercept study, a positive correlation was observed between weight loss and changes in the metabolic signatures of BMI (r = 0.5, 95% CI 0.06-0.94, p = 0.03), WC (r = 0.5, 95% CI 0.05-0.94, p = 0.03), and WHR (r = 0.6, 95% CI 0.32-0.87, p = 0.01).

Conclusions: Obesity is associated with a distinct metabolic signature comprising changes in levels of specific amino acids and lipids which is positively associated with both colorectal and endometrial cancer and is potentially reversible following weight loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-021-01970-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8086283PMC
April 2021

Risk of Pharmacological or Hospital Treatment for Depression in Patients with Colorectal Cancer-Associations with Pre-Cancer Lifestyle, Comorbidity and Clinical Factors.

Cancers (Basel) 2021 Apr 20;13(8). Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Survivorship and Inequality in Cancer Department, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.

We investigated the risk of depression in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and associated risk factors. The 1324 patients with CRC and 6620 matched cancer-free participants from the Diet, Cancer and Health study were followed for up to 16 years for either a first hospitalization for depression or antidepressant prescription after diagnosis of CRC cancer or study entry date. Information on the outcome and covariates was retrieved from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group database, the national health registries and questionnaires. Cumulative incidence of depression was estimated, and Cox regression models were used to evaluate the association between risk factors and depression incidence. During follow-up, 191 (14.4%) patients with CRC and 175 (2.6%) cancer-free comparison persons experienced depression. After adjustments, in the first year after cancer diagnosis, patients with CRC had a 12-fold higher hazard compared with the cancer-free population (HR, 12.01; 95% CI, 7.89-18.28). The risk decreased during follow-up but remained significantly elevated with an HR of 2.65 (95% CI, 1.61-4.36) after five years. Identified risk factors were presence of comorbidities, advanced disease stage and use of radiotherapy, while life style factors (pre-cancer or at diagnosis) and chemotherapy did not seem to contribute to the increased risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13081979DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8073925PMC
April 2021

Dietary intake and plasma phospholipid concentrations of saturated, monounsaturated and trans fatty acids and colorectal cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort.

Int J Cancer 2021 Apr 28. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

Epidemiologic studies examining the association between specific fatty acids and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk are inconclusive. We investigated the association between dietary estimates and plasma levels of individual and total saturated (SFA), monounsaturated (MUFA), industrial-processed trans (iTFA), and ruminant-sourced trans (rTFA) fatty acids, and CRC risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Baseline fatty acid intakes were estimated in 450 112 participants (6162 developed CRC, median follow-up = 15 years). In a nested case-control study, plasma phospholipid fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography in 433 colon cancer cases and 433 matched controls. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using Cox and conditional logistic regression, respectively. Dietary total SFA (highest vs lowest quintile, HR  = 0.80; 95%CI:0.69-0.92), myristic acid (HR  = 0.83, 95%CI:0.74-0.93) and palmitic acid (HR  = 0.81, 95%CI:0.70-0.93) were inversely associated with CRC risk. Plasma myristic acid was also inversely associated with colon cancer risk (highest vs lowest quartile, OR  = 0.51; 95%CI:0.32-0.83), whereas a borderline positive association was found for plasma stearic acid (OR  = 1.63; 95%CI:1.00-2.64). Dietary total MUFA was inversely associated with colon cancer (per 1-SD increment, HR  = 0.92, 95%CI: 0.85-0.98), but not rectal cancer (HR  = 1.04, 95%CI:0.95-1.15, P  = 0.027). Dietary iTFA, and particularly elaidic acid, was positively associated with rectal cancer (HR  = 1.07, 95%CI:1.02-1.13). Our results suggest that total and individual saturated fatty acids and fatty acids of industrial origin may be relevant to the aetiology of CRC. Both dietary and plasma myristic acid levels were inversely associated with colon cancer risk, which warrants further investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33615DOI Listing
April 2021

A Prospective Diet-Wide Association Study for Risk of Colorectal Cancer in EPIC.

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2021 Apr 24. Epub 2021 Apr 24.

Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.

Background & Aims: Evidence regarding the association of dietary exposures with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk is not consistent with a few exceptions. Therefore, we conducted a diet-wide association study (DWAS) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) to evaluate the associations between several dietary exposures with CRC risk.

Methods: The association of 92 food and nutrient intakes with CRC risk was assessed in 386,792 participants, 5069 of whom developed incident CRC. Correction for multiple comparisons was performed using the false discovery rate, and emerging associations were examined in the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS). Multiplicative gene-nutrient interactions were also tested in EPIC based on known CRC-associated loci.

Results: In EPIC, alcohol, liquor/spirits, wine, beer/cider, soft drinks, and pork were positively associated with CRC, whereas milk, cheese, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, riboflavin, vitamin B6, beta carotene, fruit, fiber, nonwhite bread, banana, and total protein intakes were inversely associated. Of these 20 associations, 13 were replicated in the NLCS, for which a meta-analysis was performed, namely alcohol (summary hazard ratio [HR] per 1-SD increment in intake: 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.09), liquor/spirits (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.06), wine (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.07), beer/cider (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.04-1.08), milk (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.93-0.98), cheese (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99), calcium (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.90-0.95), phosphorus (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.90-0.95), magnesium (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98), potassium (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99), riboflavin (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92-0.97), beta carotene (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93-0.98), and total protein (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92-0.97). None of the gene-nutrient interactions were significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons.

Conclusions: Our findings confirm a positive association for alcohol and an inverse association for dairy products and calcium with CRC risk, and also suggest a lower risk at higher dietary intakes of phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, riboflavin, beta carotene, and total protein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2021.04.028DOI Listing
April 2021

Vegetable nitrate intake, blood pressure and incident cardiovascular disease: Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study.

Eur J Epidemiol 2021 Aug 21;36(8):813-825. Epub 2021 Apr 21.

Institute for Nutrition Research, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Level 3, Royal Perth Hospital Research Foundation, Rear 50 Murray St, Perth, WA, 6000, Australia.

Whether the vascular effects of inorganic nitrate, observed in clinical trials, translate to a reduction in cardiovascular disease (CVD) with habitual dietary nitrate intake in prospective studies warrants investigation. We aimed to determine if vegetable nitrate, the major dietary nitrate source, is associated with lower blood pressure (BP) and lower risk of incident CVD. Among 53,150 participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study, without CVD at baseline, vegetable nitrate intake was assessed using a comprehensive vegetable nitrate database. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using restricted cubic splines based on multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. During 23 years of follow-up, 14,088 cases of incident CVD were recorded. Participants in the highest vegetable nitrate intake quintile (median, 141 mg/day) had 2.58 mmHg lower baseline systolic BP (95%CI - 3.12, - 2.05) and 1.38 mmHg lower diastolic BP (95%CI - 1.66, - 1.10), compared with participants in the lowest quintile. Vegetable nitrate intake was inversely associated with CVD plateauing at moderate intakes (~ 60 mg/day); this appeared to be mediated by systolic BP (21.9%). Compared to participants in the lowest intake quintile (median, 23 mg/day), a moderate vegetable nitrate intake (median, 59 mg/day) was associated with 15% lower risk of CVD [HR (95% CI) 0.85 (0.82, 0.89)]. Moderate vegetable nitrate intake was associated with 12%, 15%, 17% and 26% lower risk of ischemic heart disease, heart failure, ischemic stroke and peripheral artery disease hospitalizations respectively. Consumption of at least ~ 60 mg/day of vegetable nitrate (~ 1 cup of green leafy vegetables) may mitigate risk of CVD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10654-021-00747-3DOI Listing
August 2021

Association of Pre-diagnostic Antibody Responses to Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Proteins with Colorectal Cancer in a European Cohort.

Gut Microbes 2021 Jan-Dec;13(1):1-14

Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology, Umeå University, Ireland.

Experimental evidence has implicated genotoxic () and enterotoxigenic (ETBF) in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, evidence from epidemiological studies is sparse. We therefore assessed the association of serological markers of and ETBF exposure with odds of developing CRC in the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) study.Serum samples of incident CRC cases and matched controls (n = 442 pairs) were analyzed for immunoglobulin (Ig) A and G antibody responses to seven proteins and two isoforms of the ETBF toxin via multiplex serology. Multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of sero-positivity to and ETBF with CRC.The IgA-positivity of any of the tested antigens was associated with higher odds of developing CRC (OR: 1.42; 95% CI: 1.05-1.91). Dual-positivity for both IgA and IgG to and ETBF was associated with >1.7-fold higher odds of developing CRC, with a significant association only for IgG (OR: 1.75; 95% CI: 1.04, 2.94). This association was more pronounced when restricted to the proximal colon cancers (OR: 2.62; 95% CI: 1.09, 6.29) compared to those of the distal colon (OR: 1.24; 95% CI: 0.51, 3.00) (= 0.095). Sero-positivity to and ETBF was associated with CRC development, suggesting that co-infection of these bacterial species may contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis. These findings warrant further exploration in larger prospective studies and within different population groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19490976.2021.1903825DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8078709PMC
April 2021

Soft Drink and Juice Consumption and Renal Cell Carcinoma Incidence and Mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2021 06 13;30(6):1270-1274. Epub 2021 Apr 13.

International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.

Background: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for more than 80% of kidney cancers in adults, and obesity is a known risk factor. Regular consumption of sweetened beverages has been linked to obesity and several chronic diseases, including some types of cancer. It is uncertain whether soft drink and juice consumption is associated with risk of RCC. We investigated the associations of soft drink and juice consumption with RCC incidence and mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

Methods: A total of 389,220 EPIC participants with median age of 52 years at recruitment (1991-2000) were included. Cox regression yielded adjusted HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for RCC incidence and mortality in relation to intakes of juices and total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drinks.

Results: A total of 888 incident RCCs and 356 RCC deaths were identified. In models including adjustment for body mass index and energy intake, there was no higher risk of incident RCC associated with consumption of juices (HR per 100 g/day increment = 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.09), total soft drinks (HR = 1.01; 95% CI, 0.98-1.05), sugar-sweetened soft drinks (HR = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.94-1.05), or artificially sweetened soft drinks (HR = 1.02; 95% CI, 0.96-1.08). In these fully adjusted models, none of the beverages was associated with RCC mortality (HR, 95% CI per 100 g/day increment 1.06, 0.97-1.16; 1.03, 0.98-1.09; 0.97, 0.89-1.07; and 1.06, 0.99-1.14, respectively).

Conclusions: Consumption of juices or soft drinks was not associated with RCC incidence or mortality after adjusting for obesity.

Impact: Soft drink and juice intakes are unlikely to play an independent role in RCC development or mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-1726DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7611361PMC
June 2021

Long-Term Exposure to Fine Particle Elemental Components and Natural and Cause-Specific Mortality-a Pooled Analysis of Eight European Cohorts within the ELAPSE Project.

Environ Health Perspect 2021 Apr 12;129(4):47009. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: Inconsistent associations between long-term exposure to particles with an aerodynamic diameter [fine particulate matter ()] components and mortality have been reported, partly related to challenges in exposure assessment.

Objectives: We investigated the associations between long-term exposure to elemental components and mortality in a large pooled European cohort; to compare health effects of components estimated with two exposure modeling approaches, namely, supervised linear regression (SLR) and random forest (RF) algorithms.

Methods: We pooled data from eight European cohorts with 323,782 participants, average age 49 y at baseline (1985-2005). Residential exposure to 2010 annual average concentration of eight components [copper (Cu), iron (Fe), potassium (K), nickel (Ni), sulfur (S), silicon (Si), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn)] was estimated with Europe-wide SLR and RF models at a scale. We applied Cox proportional hazards models to investigate the associations between components and natural and cause-specific mortality. In addition, two-pollutant analyses were conducted by adjusting each component for mass and nitrogen dioxide () separately.

Results: We observed 46,640 natural-cause deaths with 6,317,235 person-years and an average follow-up of 19.5 y. All SLR-modeled components were statistically significantly associated with natural-cause mortality in single-pollutant models with hazard ratios (HRs) from 1.05 to 1.27. Similar HRs were observed for RF-modeled Cu, Fe, K, S, V, and Zn with wider confidence intervals (CIs). HRs for SLR-modeled Ni, S, Si, V, and Zn remained above unity and (almost) significant after adjustment for both and . HRs only remained (almost) significant for RF-modeled K and V in two-pollutant models. The HRs for V were 1.03 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.05) and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.10) for SLR- and RF-modeled exposures, respectively, per , adjusting for mass. Associations with cause-specific mortality were less consistent in two-pollutant models.

Conclusion: Long-term exposure to V in was most consistently associated with increased mortality. Associations for the other components were weaker for exposure modeled with RF than SLR in two-pollutant models. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP8368.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP8368DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8041432PMC
April 2021

[Alcohol consumption and risk of cancer].

Ugeskr Laeger 2021 04;183(14)

Alcohol is carcinogenic to humans. There is convincing evidence that alcohol intake increases the risk of cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus (squamous cell carcinoma), liver and colorectum, and breast cancer among postmenopausal women. Research indicates that no safe lower limit of intake exists. The risk increases with the amount of alcohol, and in most studies all types of alcohol, like wine, beer and spirits increase the risk. A substantial number of cancer cases could be prevented by a reduction in alcohol intake.
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April 2021

Substitution of unprocessed and processed red meat with poultry or fish and total and cause-specific mortality.

Br J Nutr 2021 Apr 8:1-7. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

Danish Cancer Society Research Center, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Recent studies found positive associations between intake of red meat and processed meat and total mortality; however, substitution of red meat with poultry and fish has been poorly investigated. We aimed to investigate associations for substitutions of red meat (unprocessed/processed) and total mortality and deaths due to cancer or CVD. We used data from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort, including 57 053 participants aged 50-64 years at baseline. Information on diet was collected through a validated 192-item FFQ. Information regarding total mortality, deaths due to cancer and deaths due to CVD was obtained by record linkage. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of 150 g/week substitutions of red meat with poultry or fish. During a follow-up (mean 16·1 years), 8840 deaths occurred (4567 were due to cancer; 1816 due to CVD). The adjusted HR for total death when substituting 150 g/week total red meat with poultry was 0·96 (95 % CI 0·95, 1·00) and with fish 0·99 (95 % CI 0·97, 1·01). Corresponding HR for cancer death or CVD death were similar. Substitution of processed red meat with fish or poultry was more consistently associated with a lower mortality than substitution of unprocessed red meat. For example, the adjusted HR for total death when substituting 150 g/week processed red meat with poultry was 0·95 (95 % CI 0·92, 0·98). We found that replacing processed red meat with poultry or fish was associated with a lower risk of total mortality and deaths due to cancer, but not deaths due to CVD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114521001252DOI Listing
April 2021

Dietary intake of trans fatty acids and breast cancer risk in 9 European countries.

BMC Med 2021 Mar 30;19(1):81. Epub 2021 Mar 30.

Clinical Sciences Lund, Oncology, Lund University and Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.

Background: Trans fatty acids (TFAs) have been hypothesised to influence breast cancer risk. However, relatively few prospective studies have examined this relationship, and well-powered analyses according to hormone receptor-defined molecular subtypes, menopausal status, and body size have rarely been conducted.

Methods: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), we investigated the associations between dietary intakes of TFAs (industrial trans fatty acids [ITFAs] and ruminant trans fatty acids [RTFAs]) and breast cancer risk among 318,607 women. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for other breast cancer risk factors.

Results: After a median follow-up of 8.1 years, 13,241 breast cancer cases occurred. In the multivariable-adjusted model, higher total ITFA intake was associated with elevated breast cancer risk (HR for highest vs lowest quintile, 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.23; P trend = 0.001). A similar positive association was found between intake of elaidic acid, the predominant ITFA, and breast cancer risk (HR for highest vs lowest quintile, 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.23; P trend = 0.001). Intake of total RTFAs was also associated with higher breast cancer risk (HR for highest vs lowest quintile, 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.17; P trend = 0.015). For individual RTFAs, we found positive associations with breast cancer risk for dietary intakes of two strongly correlated fatty acids (Spearman correlation r = 0.77), conjugated linoleic acid (HR for highest vs lowest quintile, 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20; P trend = 0.001) and palmitelaidic acid (HR for highest vs lowest quintile, 1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.16; P trend = 0.028). Similar associations were found for total ITFAs and RTFAs with breast cancer risk according to menopausal status, body mass index, and breast cancer subtypes.

Conclusions: These results support the hypothesis that higher dietary intakes of ITFAs, in particular elaidic acid, are associated with elevated breast cancer risk. Due to the high correlation between conjugated linoleic acid and palmitelaidic acid, we were unable to disentangle the positive associations found for these fatty acids with breast cancer risk. Further mechanistic studies are needed to identify biological pathways that may underlie these associations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-021-01952-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8008592PMC
March 2021
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