Publications by authors named "Anne Therese Tveter"

27 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Validity and reliability of the Norwegian version of the Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire in people on sick leave.

Health Qual Life Outcomes 2021 Aug 3;19(1):191. Epub 2021 Aug 3.

Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, Pilestredet 44, 0167, Oslo, Norway.

Background: The Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ) is a recently developed generic questionnaire that consists of 14 items assessing health status in people with musculoskeletal disorders. The objective was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the MSK-HQ into Norwegian and to examine its construct validity and reliability in people on sick leave with musculoskeletal disorders.

Methods: A prospective cohort study was carried out in Norway on people between 18 and 67 years of age and sick leave due to a musculoskeletal disorder. The participants were recruited through the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration during November 2018-January 2019 and responded to the MSK-HQ at inclusion and after four weeks. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha, and structural validity with a factor analysis. Construct validity was assessed by eight "a priori" defined hypotheses regarding correlations between the MSK-HQ and other reference scales. Correlations were analyzed by Spearman's- or Pearson's correlation coefficient and interpreted as high with values ≥ 0.50, moderate between 0.30-0.49, and low < 0.29. Reliability was tested with test-retest, standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest detectable change (SDC).

Results: A total of 549 patients, mean age (SD) 48.6 (10.7), 309 women (56.3%), were included. The mean (SD) MSK-HQ sum scores (min-max 3-56) were 27.7 (8.2). Internal consistency was 0.86 and a three-factor structure was determined by factor analysis. Construct validity was supported by the confirmation of all hypotheses; high correlation with HRQOL, psychosocial risk profile, and self-perceived health; moderate correlation with physical activity, self-perceived work ability, and work presenteeism; and low correlation with the number of sick days. The test-retest reliability was good with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.83 (95% CI, 0.74-0.89), SEM was 2.3 and SDC 6.5.

Conclusions: The Norwegian version of the MSK-HQ demonstrated high internal consistency, a three-factor structure, good construct validity and good test-retest reliability when used among people on sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12955-021-01827-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8336321PMC
August 2021

Reliability, validity and responsiveness of pelvic floor muscle surface electromyography and manometry.

Int Urogynecol J 2021 Jun 17. Epub 2021 Jun 17.

Akershus University Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lørenskog, Norway.

Introduction And Hypothesis: Vaginal surface electromyography (sEMG) is commonly used to assess pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function and dysfunction but there is a lack of studies regarding the assessment properties. The aim of the study was to test the hypotheses that sEMG has good test-retest intratester reliability, good criterion validity and is responsive to changes compared to manometry.

Methods: PFM resting tone, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and endurance were measured in 66 women with pelvic floor dysfunction. One assessment by manometry was followed by two testing sessions with sEMG at baseline. After 4 to 42 weeks of supervised PFM strength training, 29 participants were retested with both devices.

Results: Median age of the participants was 41 years (range 24-83) and parity 2 (range 0-10). Very good test-retest intratester reliability was found for all three sEMG measurements. The correlation between sEMG and manometry was moderate for vaginal resting tone (r = 0.42, n = 66, p < 0.001) and strong for MVC (r = 0.66, n = 66, p < 0.001) and endurance (r = 0.67, n = 66, p < 0.001). Following the strength training period, participants demonstrated increased MVC and endurance measured with manometry, but not with sEMG. A significant reduction in resting tone was found only with sEMG.

Conclusion: sEMG is reliable and correlates well with manometry. However, sEMG is not as responsive as manometry for changes in PFM MVC and endurance. For measurement of PFM resting tone, sEMG seems more responsive than manometry, but this requires further investigation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00192-021-04881-0DOI Listing
June 2021

What Are the most Important Problems in Functioning among Patients with Shoulder Pain? An Analysis of the Patient-Specific Functional Scale.

Phys Ther 2021 Jun 4. Epub 2021 Jun 4.

Department of Physiotherapy, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University, Postboks 4, St. Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo, Norway.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify important functional problems among patients with shoulder pain, using the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), and to investigate differences between patients receiving primary care and patients receiving secondary care.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study located in a primary and secondary care outpatient clinic, a total of 177 patients seeking care for shoulder pain (84 from primary care and 93 from secondary care) were recruited. Background variables, pain, physical activity, and PSFS responses were collected using a questionnaire software package. Meaningful concepts were linked from the PSFS responses to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), according to established rules. Frequencies for the ICF categories were estimated separately for primary care and secondary care. Differences between primary care and secondary care were investigated by calculating CIs for the sample proportions at ICF chapter level.

Results: The primary care sample reported functional problems linked to 226 ICF categories, whereas the secondary care sample reported functional problems linked to 337 ICF categories. Of the linked ICF categories, 87.7% belonged to the Activities and Participation component of the ICF. Seventeen categories were identified in >3% of the patients; of those, the most frequent categories were: recreation and leisure, lifting and carrying objects, doing housework, hand and arm use, and remunerative employment. Categories included in the ICF chapters of self-care and domestic life were significantly more frequent in the secondary care sample, whereas there was a trend that neuromusculoskeletal and movement-related functions were more frequent in primary care.

Conclusions: The present findings indicate that patients with shoulder pain report a wide range of functional problems, from basic functions related to mobility to activities related to work and leisure. This study also discovered differences between patients in primary care and secondary care. The large variation in the experiences between patients supports the use of an individualized measure in assessments.

Impact: This study adds new knowledge about problems in functioning among patients with shoulder pain and how the patient experience varies between primary care and secondary care settings. Moreover, the content analyses used in this study showed the full potential of the ICF classification and should have potential for further application.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ptj/pzab141DOI Listing
June 2021

Comparison of self-reported and public registered absenteeism among people on long-term sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders: criterion validity of the iMTA Productivity Cost Questionnaire.

Eur J Health Econ 2021 Aug 1;22(6):865-872. Epub 2021 Jun 1.

Department of Physiotherapy, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: To evaluate criterion validity of the iMTA Productivity Cost Questionnaire (iPCQ) by comparing iPCQ-reported occurrence and duration of long-term absenteeism (> 4 weeks) with public registry data collected from the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV) among people on sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders.

Method: Baseline data from a cohort study was used, in which people on sick leave for at least 4 weeks due to musculoskeletal disorders were recruited electronically through the NAV website. To compare the occurrence of long-term absenteeism overall agreement between the two methods was measured by percentages. To compare the duration (number of days with absenteeism) and adjusted duration (number of days with complete absenteeism) of long-term absenteeism we conducted intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) two-way random average agreement, descriptive statistic and Wilcoxon signed-rank test.

Results: In total, 144 participants with a median age (range) of 49 (24-67) were included. The overall agreement on the occurrence of long-term absenteeism was 100%. The ICC value was 0.97 and 0.86 for duration and adjusted duration of long-term absenteeism, respectively. The median difference between the two methods was 0 and 17 days for long-term absenteeism duration and adjusted duration, respectively. A significant difference between the two methods was observed (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) with regards to adjusted duration of long-term absenteeism.

Conclusion: The iPCQ showed good agreement with public registry data regarding the occurrence and duration of long-term absenteeism among people with musculoskeletal disorders on long-term sick-leave in Norway. However, the iPCQ does not cover part-time sick-leave and thereby potentially overestimate the total amount of long-term absenteeism.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier no. NCT04196634.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10198-021-01294-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8275498PMC
August 2021

Use of video consultations in an outpatient rheumatology clinic.

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2021 05 19;141(8). Epub 2021 May 19.

Background: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the implementation of video consultations as an alternative to hospital face-to-face consultations was advanced for persons with rheumatic diseases at Diakonhjemmet Hospital. Video consultations were introduced in March 2020, and this article presents the experiences gained by healthcare professionals and patients.

Material And Method: The data was collected in June 2020 through focus-group interviews with healthcare professionals and through an anonymous online survey of patients who had attended video consultations during a period of three weeks in June 2020.

Results: The data from the focus-group interviews with seven rheumatologists and seven nurses were sorted into main thematic categories: patient, healthcare professional, consultation, and technology. The healthcare professionals felt that video consultations, with some exceptions, were appropriate in the follow-up of patients with rheumatic diseases, and especially for stable patients with no confounding issues. Of the 383 patients who were invited to participate, 139 (36 %) responded to the survey. The patients were largely satisfied with the video consultation, with a median score of 10 (quartiles 8-10) on a numerical rating scale from 0 to 10, however, 32 (27 %) patients considered the lack of clinical examination to be detrimental.

Interpretation: Video consultations are often appropriate in the follow-up of patients with a rheumatic disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.20.0882DOI Listing
May 2021

Criterion validity of The International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF) for use in clinical practice in patients with osteoarthritis.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2021 Feb 27;22(1):232. Epub 2021 Feb 27.

National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, The Division of Rheumatology and Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Background: To tailor physical activity treatment programs for patients with osteoarthritis, clinicians need valid and feasible measurement tools to evaluate habitual physical activity. The widely used International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF) is not previously validated in patients with osteoarthritis.

Purpose: To assess the concurrent criterion validity of the IPAQ-SF in patients with osteoarthritis, using an accelerometer as a criterion-method.

Method: Patients with osteoarthritis (n = 115) were recruited at The Division of Rheumatology and Research at Diakonhjemmet Hospital (Oslo, Norway). Physical activity was measured by patients wearing an accelerometer (ActiGraph wGT3X-BT) for seven consecutive days, followed by reporting their physical activity for the past 7 days using the IPAQ-SF. Comparison of proportions that fulfilled physical activity recommendations as measured by the two methods were tested by Pearson Chi-Square analysis. Differences in physical activity levels between the IPAQ-SF and the accelerometer were analyzed with Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test and Spearman rank correlation test. Bland-Altman plots were used to visualize the concurrent criterion validity for total- and intensity-specific physical activity levels.

Results: In total, 93 patients provided complete physical activity data, mean (SD) age was 65 (8.7) years, 87% were women. According to the IPAQ-SF, 57% of the patients fulfilled the minimum physical activity recommendations compared to 31% according to the accelerometer (p = 0.043). When comparing the IPAQ-SF to the accelerometer we found significant under-reporting of total physical activity MET-minutes (p = < 0.001), sitting (p = < 0.001) and walking (p < 0.001), and significant over-reporting of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (p < 0.001). For the different physical activity levels, correlations between the IPAQ-SF and the accelerometer ranged from rho 0.106 to 0.462. The Bland-Altman plots indicated an increased divergence between the two methods with increasing time spent on moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity.

Conclusion: Physical activity is a core treatment of osteoarthritis. Our finding that patients tend to over-report activity of higher intensity and under-report low-intensity activity and sitting-time is of clinical importance. We conclude that the concurrent criterion validity of the IPAQ-SF was weak in patients with osteoarthritis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12891-021-04069-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7916302PMC
February 2021

The Measure of Activity Performance of the hand (MAP-Hand) - A reliable and valid questionnaire for use in patients with hand osteoarthritis with specific involvement of the thumb.

J Hand Ther 2020 Nov 12. Epub 2020 Nov 12.

Department of Rheumatology, National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Study Design: Cross-sectional methodological study with test-retest design.

Introduction: The Measure of Activity Performance of the Hand (MAP-Hand) is an assessment tool measuring hand-related activity limitations.

Purpose: To assess reliability, validity, and interpretability of the MAP-Hand in patients with hand osteoarthritis with specific involvement of the thumb (CMC1).

Methods: One hundred-and-eighty patients referred to surgical consultation for hand osteoarthritis affecting the CMC1 were included in the evaluation of validity and interpretability. Among these, 59 stable patients were included in reliability analyses, completing the questionnaire twice with a 2-week retest interval. The MAP-Hand has 18 predefined and 5 optional patient-specific items, scored on a 4-point scale (1 = no difficulty to 4 = not able to do). Relative (ICC) and absolute (SDC) reliability were calculated. An ICC of >0.70 was considered acceptable. Nine (75%) or more of 12 predetermined hypotheses had to be confirmed for acceptable construct validity. Interpretability was assessed using floor and ceiling effects and considered present if 15% scored at eitherend of the scale.

Results: Mean (SD) age was 63 (8) years, and most patients were women (79%). The mean total score of predefined items showed acceptable reliability (ICC 0.74, SDC 0.60) and construct validity. The mean total score of the patient-specific items did not reach acceptable reliability. Ceiling effect was found for the predefined items.

Discussion And Conclusions: We found that the mean total score of the predefined items on MAP-Hand had acceptable reliability and construct validity but a ceiling effect in patients with hand osteoarthritis with CMC1 affection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2020.11.001DOI Listing
November 2020

Femoral lengthening might impair physical function and lead to structural changes in adjacent joints: 10 patients with 27 to 34 years' follow-up.

Acta Orthop 2021 06 7;92(3):329-334. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

Department of Children´s Orthopaedics and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo;

Background and purpose - Literature describing long-term functional outcome and osteoarthritis (OA) in adjacent joints after femoral lengthening is rare. We evaluated physical function and the presence of radiographic OA in adjacent joints in 10 patients ≥ 27 years after femoral lengthening.Patients and methods - We conducted a cross-sectional study of 10 patients treated by unilateral femoral lengthening. Follow-up was between 27 and 34 years. Physical function was evaluated by the 30-second sit-to-stand (30sSTS) and a stair test and was compared with reference values. 4 single-legged hop tests were used to assess difference in physical function between the lengthened and contralateral limb. Radiographic OA was evaluated by joint space width (JSW) and Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) classification.Results - The patients scored worse compared with reference values on the 30sSTS and stair test, and worse on the lengthened limb on the single- and triple-hop test. Radiographic OA was found in the hip or knee in the lengthened limb in 3 of 10 patients based on JSW and 4 of 10 based on KL. No radiographic OA was found in unlengthened limbs.Interpretation - Our results showed impaired physical function both in general and of the lengthened limb. Additionally, we found a possible association between femoral lengthening and radiographic OA in adjacent joints in the long term. However, the sample size of the current study is small.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17453674.2020.1866864DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8231406PMC
June 2021

Short-term effects of occupational therapy on hand function and pain in patients with carpometacarpal osteoarthritis: secondary analyses from a randomized controlled trial.

Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2020 Dec 18. Epub 2020 Dec 18.

National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Division of Rheumatology and Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: To assess the short-term effects of multimodal occupational therapy on pain and hand function in patients referred for surgical consultation due to carpometacarpal joint (CMC1) osteoarthritis (OA).

Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, CMC1 OA patients referred for surgical consultation at three rheumatology departments were randomized to 3 months multimodal occupational therapy (including patient education, hand exercises, orthoses, and assistive devices) or usual treatment (OA information). Pain was measured on a numeric rating scale from 0-10 (0, no pain). Function included grip and pinch strength (Newtons), range-of-motion [palmar and CMC1 abduction (°); flexion deficit in digits 2-5 (mm)], and self-reported Measure of Activity Performance of the Hand (MAP-Hand; range: 1-4; 1, no activity limitation) and QuickDASH (range: 0-100; 0, no disability). Between-group difference was assessed with follow-up values as dependent variables and group as an independent variable, adjusted for baseline values and time to follow-up.

Results: Among 180 patients (mean age 63 (SD 8) years; 81% women), 170 completed the short-term follow-up assessment (3-4 months after baseline). Compared to usual treatment, occupational therapy yielded significantly improved pain at rest (-1.4 [-0.7, -2.0], P < 0.001), pain following grip strength (-1.1 [-0.5, -1.7], P = 0.001), grip strength (23.4 [7.5, 39.3], P = 0.004), MAP-Hand (-0.18 [-0.09, -0.28], P = 0.001), and QuickDASH (-8.1 [-4.6, -11.5], P < 0.001).

Conclusion: The multimodal occupational therapy intervention had significant short-term effects on pain, grip strength, and hand function in patients with CMC1 OA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.24543DOI Listing
December 2020

Patient Goals and Motivation for Thumb Carpometacarpal Osteoarthritis Surgery.

Hand (N Y) 2020 Sep 28:1558944720940063. Epub 2020 Sep 28.

Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Knowledge is lacking on patient goals and motivation for carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis (CMCJ OA) surgery. The objective of this study was to explore patient goals and motivation for surgery, whether patient goals were reflected in self-reports of pain and function, and factors characterizing patients highly motivated for surgery.

Methods: This cross-sectional study included 180 patients referred from their general practitioner for CMCJ surgical consultation. Goals for surgery were collected with an open-ended question, categorized with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health coding system, and compared to self-reports of pain and function. Motivation for surgery was rated with a Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, 0-10, 0 = not motivated). Factors characterizing patients highly motivated for surgery (NRS ≥ 8) were explored with multivariate regression analyses.

Results: The mean age of the participants was 63 years (SD = 7.6), and 142 (79%) were women. The most common goals for surgery were to reduce pain and improve arm and hand use, but these were not reflected in self-reports of pain and function. Fifty-six (31%) of the patients were characterized as highly motivated for surgery. High motivation for surgery was strongly associated with reporting more activity limitations (odds ratio [OR] = 4.00, = .008), living alone (OR = 3.18, = .007), and a young age (OR = 0.94, = .002).

Conclusions: Decisions on CMCJ OA surgery should be based on assessment and discussion of patients' life situation, hand pain, activity limitations for, and goals and motivation for surgery. According to the european league against rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations, previously received conservative and pharmacological treatment should also be evaluated.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1558944720940063DOI Listing
September 2020

Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Nepali Version of the Pelvic Girdle Questionnaire.

J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2020 Mar - Apr;43(3):257-265. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to translate, cross-culturally adapt, and assess the reliability and validity of the Pelvic Girdle Questionnaire (PGQ) in pregnant Nepalese women.

Methods: The cross-cultural adaptation process was conducted according to the Guillemin guidelines. Reliability and validity were assessed using cross-sectional design. The participants responded to questionnaires of sociodemographics, the Nepali version of the PGQ, the Oswestry Disability Index, the Patient-Specific Functional Scale, the 5-item version of the Edinburgh Depression Scale, and the Numerical Pain Rating Scale. The internal consistency was assessed with Cronbach's alpha. The test-retest reliability was calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient and smallest detectable change. Construct validity was assessed by testing 9 a priori hypotheses that examine correlations between the PGQ activity and symptom subscales, and also among the PGQ subscales and Oswestry Disability Index, Numerical Pain Rating Scale, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, and 5-item version of the Edinburgh Depression Scale. Spearman and Pearson's correlation were used to assess the correlations.

Results: A sample of 111 pregnant women were included in the study. The Cronbach's alpha for the Nepali version of the total PGQ was good (α = 0.83), and the test-retest reliability was acceptable (ICC, 0.72) with a measurement error of SDC 18.6 points. Seven of the 9 hypotheses found support, which confirms acceptable construct validity of the Nepali PGQ.

Conclusion: The Nepali version of the PGQ is a reliable and valid tool for assessing pelvic girdle pain in pregnant Nepalese women.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmpt.2019.04.009DOI Listing
March 2021

Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of adding motivational interviewing or stratified vocational advice intervention to usual case management on return to work for people with musculoskeletal disorders. The MI-NAV study.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2020 Jul 28;21(1):496. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

Department of Physiotherapy, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University, St. Olavs plass, 0130, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Little research exists on the effectiveness of motivational interviewing (MI) on return to work (RTW) in workers on long term sick leave. The objectives of this study protocol is to describe a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with the objectives to compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of usual case management alone with usual case management plus MI or usual case management plus stratified vocational advice intervention (SVAI), on RTW among people on sick leave due to musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders.

Methods: A multi-arm RCT with economic evaluation will be conducted in Norway with recruitment of 450 participants aged 18-67 years on 50-100% sick leave for > 7 weeks due to MSK disorders. Participants will be randomized to either usual case management by the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV) alone, usual case management by NAV plus MI, or usual case management by NAV plus SVAI. Trained caseworkers in NAV will give two MI sessions, and physiotherapists will give 1-4 SVAI sessions depending upon risk of long-term sick leave. The primary outcome is the number of sick leave days from randomization to 6 months follow-up. Secondary outcomes are number of sick leave days at 12 months follow-up, time until sustainable RTW (≥4 weeks of at least 50% of their usual working hours) at 12 months, proportions of participants receiving sick leave benefits during 12 months of follow-up, and MSK symptoms influencing health at 12 months. Cost-utility evaluated by the EuroQoL 5D-5L and cost-benefit analyses will be performed. Fidelity of the interventions will be assessed through audio-recordings of approximately 10% of the intervention sessions.

Discussion: The results from this RCT will inform stakeholders involved in supporting RTW due to MSK disorders such as staff within NAV and primary health care.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT03871712 registered March 12th 2020.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12891-020-03475-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7385885PMC
July 2020

The MAP-Hand: Psychometric properties and differences in activity performance between patients with carpometacarpal osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

J Rehabil Med 2020 Jun 12;52(6):jrm00070. Epub 2020 Jun 12.

Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, , 0370 Oslo, Norway. E-mail:

Objective: To assess construct validity (Rasch analyses) of the Measure of Activity Performance of the Hand (MAP-Hand) in people with carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (CMC1 OA), and to explore differences in activity performance between people with CMC1 OA and those with rheumatoid arthritis.

Design: Cross-sectional study.

Subjects: A total of 180 people with CMC1 OA referred for surgical consultation were recruited from rheumatology clinics in Norway, and 340 people with rheumatoid arthritis were recruited from outpatient rheumatology clinics in the UK.

Methods: The MAP-Hand consists of 18 predefined items scored on a 4-point scale from 1 (no difficulty) to 4 (unable to do), from which a mean score is calculated. Construct validity was assessed using Rasch analyses. Differences between the 2 groups were assessed using an independent sample t-test at the group level and differential item functioning (condition as grouping variable) at the item level.

Results: Some mis-targeting of data and clusters of dependency were found, but the MAP-Hand scores showed an overall fit to the model. No between-group difference in total mean MAP-Hand score was found, but there were significant differences between the 2 groups on item levels.

Conclusion: The MAP-Hand showed satisfactory construct validity and could differentiate between people with CMC1 OA and those with rheumatoid arthritis on item levels.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2696DOI Listing
June 2020

Responsiveness and minimal important change of the QuickDASH and PSFS when used among patients with shoulder pain.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2020 May 27;21(1):328. Epub 2020 May 27.

Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Physiotherapy, Oslo Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 4, St Olavs Plass, Oslo, Norway.

Background: The Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (QuickDASH) and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) are commonly used outcome instruments for measuring self-reported disability in patients with shoulder pain. To date, few studies have evaluated the responsiveness and estimated their minimal important change (MIC). Further assessment will expand the current knowledge and improve the interpretability of these instruments in clinical and research practice. The purpose of this prospective cohort study with 3 months follow-up was to evaluate the responsiveness of the QuickDASH and PSFS in patients with shoulder pain, and to estimate their MICs by using two different anchor-based methods.

Methods: Patients with shoulder pain recruited at a multidisciplinary hospital outpatient clinic completed the QuickDASH and PSFS at baseline and at 3 months follow-up. The responsiveness was evaluated by using a criterion approach with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and a construct approach by testing 9 a-priori hypotheses. The MIC was assessed using two anchor-based MIC methods.

Results: 134 patients participated at baseline and 117 (87.3%) at 3 months follow-up. The AUC was acceptable for both QuickDASH (0.75) and PSFS (0.75). QuickDASH met 7 (77.8%) and PSFS 8 (88.9%) of the hypotheses. None of the instruments showed signs of floor and ceiling effects. The MIC estimates ranged from 10.8 to 13.6 for QuickDASH and from 1.9 to 2.0 for PSFS, depending on the method used.

Conclusion: This study demonstrates that both the QuickDASH and PSFS are responsive measures of disability in patients with shoulder pain. The estimated MIC values were presented.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12891-020-03289-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7254648PMC
May 2020

Risk assessment for prolonged sickness absence due to musculoskeletal disorders: protocol for a prospective cohort study.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2020 May 25;21(1):326. Epub 2020 May 25.

Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, St.Olavs plass, 0130, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are the leading cause of sickness absence and disability pension in Norway. There is strong evidence that long-term sickness absence due to musculoskeletal disorders are associated with a reduced probability of return to work (RTW). A way to meet the economic and resource-demanding challenges related to individual follow-up of this group is to identify and treat those individuals with a high risk of prolonged sickness. The overall purposes of this project are 1) to determine the most accurate screening tool to identify people at a high risk of prolonged sickness absence due to an musculoskeletal disorder, and 2) to investigate severity of musculoskeletal health, health-related quality-of-life, health care utilization, and costs across different risk profiles in people on sick leave due to a musculoskeletal disorder.

Methods: People older than 18 years of age on sick leave for at least 4 weeks due to a musculoskeletal disorder will be invited to participate in this prospective observational cohort study conducted within the Norwegian Welfare and Labor Administration (NAV) system in collaboration with OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University. The main outcome is sickness absence, obtained from the NAV registry. Data on sickness absence will be retrieved prospectively in the period from study inclusion to 12 months follow-up, and retrospectively 12 months before inclusion in the study. Possible risk factors will be self-reported by the participants at inclusion while health care utilization will be retrieved from registry data. To conduct analyses including 15 to 20 predictor variables, we aim at including 500-600 people on sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders.

Discussion: This study may provide tools that can be used to identify individuals with high risk of prolonged sickness absence and may thus be important from both a socioeconomic and individual perspective. Further, the study may give valuable insight into identification of sickness absence profiles and the associations between these profiles and musculoskeletal health status, health-related quality of life and costs.

Trial Registration: Retrospectively registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04196634, 27.11.2019).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12891-020-03354-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7249352PMC
May 2020

Does occupational therapy delay or reduce the proportion of patients that receives thumb carpometacarpal joint surgery? A multicentre randomised controlled trial.

RMD Open 2019 6;5(2):e001046. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Objectives: To evaluate whether occupational therapy, provided in the period between referral and surgical consultation, might delay or reduce the need of surgery in thumb carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) osteoarthritis and to explore predictors for CMCJ surgery.

Methods: This multicentre randomised controlled trial included patients referred for surgical consultation due to CMCJ osteoarthritis. An occupational therapy group received hand osteoarthritis education, assistive devices, CMCJ orthoses and exercises. A control group received only hand osteoarthritis information. Primary outcome was the proportion of patients that had received CMCJ surgery after 2 years. We examined the primary outcome and predictors for surgery with regression models, and time to surgery with the log-rank test and cox regression analyses.

Results: Of 221 patients screened for eligibility, 180 were randomised. Information on the primary outcome was collected from medical records for all included patients. Surgery was performed on 22 patients (24%) that had received occupational therapy and 29 (32%) control patients (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.26 to 1.21; p=0.14). Median time to surgery was 350 days (IQR 210-540) in the occupational therapy group and 296 days (IQR 188-428) in the control group (p=0.13). Previous non-pharmacological treatment (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.14 to 6.50) and higher motivation for surgery (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.43) were significant predictors for CMCJ surgery.

Conclusions: Occupational therapy showed a small non-significant tendency to delay and reduce the need for surgery in CMCJ osteoarthritis. Previous non-pharmacological treatment and higher motivation for surgery were significant predictors for surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/rmdopen-2019-001046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6861078PMC
June 2020

Risk factors for episodes of back pain in emerging adults. A systematic review.

Eur J Pain 2020 01 3;24(1):19-38. Epub 2019 Sep 3.

Department of Physiotherapy, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.

Background And Objective: The transition from adolescence to adulthood is a sensitive period in life for health outcomes, including back pain. The objective was to synthesize evidence on risk factors for new episodes of back pain in emerging adults (18-29 years).

Methods: The protocol was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42016046635). We searched Medline; EMBASE; AMED and other databases up to September 2018 for prospective cohort studies that estimated the association between risk factor(s) and self-reported back pain. Risk factors could be measured before or during the age range 18-29 years, and back pain could be measured during or after this age range, with at least 12 months between assessments. Risk factors assessed in ≥3 studies were summarized. Risk of bias was assessed using a 6-item checklist.

Results: Forty-nine studies were included with more than 150 different risk factors studied. Nine studies had low risk of bias, 26 had moderate and 14 had high risk of bias. Age, sex, height, body mass index (BMI), smoking, physical activity level, a history of back pain, job satisfaction and structural imaging findings were investigated in three or more studies. History of back pain was the only risk factor consistently associated with back pain after adjustment (nine studies).

Conclusion: There is moderate quality evidence that a history of back pain is a risk factor for back pain. There are inconsistent associations for age, sex, height, BMI, smoking and activity level. No associations were found between job satisfaction and structural imaging findings and back pain.

Significance: Emerging adulthood is a transitional period of life with changes in life style, potentially influencing future musculoskeletal health. This systematic review included 49 articles evaluating more than 150 potential risk factors for back pain, one of the most prevalent musculoskeletal disorders. No consistent results were found for life style factors such as physical activity level or BMI, both highlighted as important risk factors in previous literature. Importantly, a previous episode of back pain was a consistent risk factor for a new episode of back pain across several studies, and further investigation of risk factors for the first back pain episode is needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejp.1474DOI Listing
January 2020

Pelvic floor muscle training programme in pregnant Nepalese women-a feasibility study.

Int Urogynecol J 2020 08 25;31(8):1609-1619. Epub 2019 Jul 25.

Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Introduction And Hypothesis: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is internationally recommended for prevention and treatment of urinary incontinence (UI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). However, there is lack of knowledge about PFMT among pregnant Nepalese women. The objectives of this study were to develop a PFMT programme and to assess the feasibility of the programme.

Methods: A feasibility study was conducted to address aspects of the PFMT programme provided to pregnant women attending antenatal check-ups at Kathmandu University Dhulikhel Hospital. The women were recruited consecutively from June 2017 to April 2018. The PFMT programme consisted of attending a minimum of four supervised PFMT follow-up visits after inclusion to the programme and performing PFMT daily at home. Feasibility was assessed in terms of the recruitment capability, sample characteristics, data collection procedures, outcome measures, and acceptability (attendance to PFMT visits, PFMT adherence, participant experiences) of the programme. Data were collected using self-reported questionnaires. Educational material (video, leaflet, and exercise diary) was developed in Nepali.

Results: Among 253 women included, 144 (57%) attended four or more supervised PFMT visits. No significant differences were found in the symptoms of UI (0.89) and POP (0.44) between those attending and those not attending four PFMT visits. Half of the women adhered to 50-100% of PFMT daily at home. The supervised PFMT and the educational material motivated the women to daily PFMT.

Conclusion: The PFMT programme was acceptable, at least to those living in the district of the study site. The results and experiences from the current study may guide implementation and future studies on the effectiveness of PFMT in Nepal.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00192-019-04053-1DOI Listing
August 2020

Prevalence and severity of low back- and pelvic girdle pain in pregnant Nepalese women.

BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2019 Jul 15;19(1):247. Epub 2019 Jul 15.

Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Low back pain (LBP) and pelvic girdle pain (PGP) are commonly reported during pregnancy and are known to affect pregnant women's well-being. Still, these conditions are often considered to be a normal part of pregnancy. This study assesses the prevalence and severity of LBP and/or PGP among pregnant Nepalese women, as well as exploring factors associated with LBP and PGP.

Methods: A cross-sectional study with successive recruitment of pregnant women was conducted at two district hospitals in Nepal from May 2016 to May 2017. The data was collected using self-reported questionnaires. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to assess the associations between independent variables and LBP and/or PGP.

Results: A total of 1284 pregnant women were included in the study. The reported prevalence of pregnancy-related LBP and/or PGP was 34%. Pain intensity was high with a mean score (standard deviation) of 6 (2). The median (25th-75th percentiles) disability scores according to the total Pelvic Girdle Questionnaire and Oswestry Disability Index were 20 (10-32) and 30 (21-38), respectively. Even though only 52% of the women believed that the pain would disappear after delivery, concern about LBP and/or PGP was reported to be low (median 2 (0-4) (Numeric Rating Scale 0-10)). In the final model for women with LBP and/or PGP the adjusted odds ratios were for body mass index (20-24, 25-30, > 30) 0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.44-1.21), 1.1 (95% CI, 0.66-1.83), and 1.5 (95% CI, 0.78-2.94) respectively, for pelvic organ prolapse symptoms 6.6 (95% CI, 4.93-8.95) and for women with educated husbands (primary or secondary, higher secondary or above) 1.1 (95% CI, 0.53-2.16) and 1.7 (95% CI, 0.84-3.47), respectively.

Conclusions: Pregnant Nepalese women commonly report LBP and/or PGP. The women experienced low disability despite severe pain intensity and poor beliefs in recovery after delivery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12884-019-2398-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6631866PMC
July 2019

Non-pharmacological treatment gap preceding surgical consultation in thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis - a cross-sectional study.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2019 Apr 30;20(1):180. Epub 2019 Apr 30.

Department of Rheumatology, National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, PO Box 23, Vinderen, N-0319, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) in the thumb carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) is a prevalent disease which may lead to structural damage, severe pain and functional limitations. Evidence-based treatment recommendations state that all patients with hand OA should be offered non-pharmacological treatment. Surgery should be considered only when other treatment has proven insufficient in relieving pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate prior treatment and characteristics of patients referred to specialist health care surgical consultation due to CMCJ OA. The study includes exploring differences in pain and function between referred and non-referred hand, between men and women, and between patients with and without OA affection of other finger joints than CMCJ.

Methods: Patients in this cross-sectional study reported prior non-pharmacological treatment for CMCJ OA. Patient demographics, disease and functional variables were assessed based on hand radiographs, patient-reported and observer-based outcome measures. Differences in pain and function between referred and non-referred hand, men and women, and between patients with and without additional affection of finger joints other than CMCJ, were analysed using Paired-samples T-tests, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, or Chi-Square tests.

Results: One hundred and eighty patients were included. The mean age was 63 years and 79% were women. Only 21% reported having received non-pharmacological treatment before referral to surgical consultation. The results show a statistically significant worse function for referred hands, women and involvement of additional interphalangeal joints. Most patients reported no pain or mild pain in their referred hand.

Conclusions: The results of this study show a non-pharmacological treatment gap in OA care. Most patients report no pain or mild pain, and that they had not received non-pharmacological treatment prior to being referred to CMCJ OA surgical consultation. The results furthermore show that CMCJ OA negatively affects all aspects of function. Strategies need to be developed to improve OA care, including educating general practitioners in evidence-based treatment recommendations and in the assessment of hand pain, and encourage the routine referral of patients with symptomatic hand OA to occupational therapy before considering surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12891-019-2567-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6492412PMC
April 2019

Resistance training in addition to multidisciplinary rehabilitation for patients with chronic pain in the low back: Study protocol.

Contemp Clin Trials Commun 2017 Jun 12;6:115-121. Epub 2017 Apr 12.

Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Introduction: Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem worldwide. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation and exercise is recommended for the management of chronic LBP. However, there is a need to investigate effective exercise interventions that is available in clinics and as home-based training on a large scale. This article presents the design and rationale of the first randomized clinical trial investigating the effects of progressive resistance training with elastic bands in addition to multidisciplinary rehabilitation for patients with moderate to severe chronic LBP.

Methods And Analysis: We aim to enroll 100 patients with chronic LBP referred to a specialized outpatient hospital clinic in Norway. Participants will be randomized equally to either; a) 3 tion including whole-body progressive resistance training using elastic bands - followed by home-based progressive resistance training for 9 weeks, or b) 3 weeks of multidisciplinary rehabilitation including general physical exercise - followed by home-based general physical exercise for 9 weeks. Questionnaires and strength tests will be collected at baseline, weeks 3 and 12, and at 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome is between-group changes in pain-related disability at week 12 assessed by the Oswestry disability index. Secondary outcomes include pain, work ability, work status, mental health, health-related quality of life, global rating of change, general health, and muscular strength and pain-related disability up to 12 months of follow-up.

Discussion: This study will provide valuable information for clinicians working with patients with chronic LBP.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02420236.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.conctc.2017.04.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5936860PMC
June 2017

Association between V̇O, handgrip strength, and musculoskeletal pain among construction and health care workers.

BMC Public Health 2017 03 21;17(1):272. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

National Institute of Occupational Health, PO Box 8149 Dep, 0033, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Construction and health care workers have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders, and they are assumed to have physically demanding jobs. Profession- and gender-specific associations between individual capacity and musculoskeletal pain have not been sufficiently investigated. The main aim of this study was to examine the association between individual capacity (maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O) and handgrip strength) and musculoskeletal pain among construction and health care workers.

Methods: This cross-sectional study examined 137 construction and health care workers (58 women and 79 men) with a mean age of 41.8 years (standard deviation 12). Aerobic capacity was indirectly assessed by the Åstrand cycle test, and strength was assessed by a handgrip test. Musculoskeletal pain was described by total pain, divided into neck, shoulder, and low back pain, during the last 12 months, and it was dichotomized in below or above 30 days. Logistic regression was used to analyse the associations between V̇O, strength, and musculoskeletal pain in the total study sample and separately for construction and health care workers. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and selected mechanical and psychosocial factors.

Results: Every second participant (51.8%) reported pain in either neck, shoulders or low back for more than 30 days during the last 12 months. Among the health care workers, a small but significant association was found between a high V̇O, high handgrip strength, and a low level of musculoskeletal pain. No association was found for the construction workers.

Conclusions: An association between V̇O handgrip strength, and musculoskeletal pain was found for health care workers but not for construction workers. These results indicate that activities promoting individual capacity may reduce musculoskeletal pain for health care workers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-017-4173-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5359892PMC
March 2017

Health-related physical fitness measures: reference values and reference equations for use in clinical practice.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2014 Jul 5;95(7):1366-73. Epub 2014 Mar 5.

Institute of Health and Society, Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Division of Surgery and Clinical Neuroscience, Orthopaedic Department, Section of Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: To provide reference values and reference equations for frequently used clinical field tests of health-related physical fitness for use in clinical practice.

Design: Cross-sectional design.

Setting: General community.

Participants: Convenience sample of volunteers (N=370) between 18 and 90 years of age were recruited from a wide range of settings (ie, work sites, schools, community centers for older adults) and different geographic locations (ie, urban, suburban, rural) in southeastern Norway.

Interventions: Not applicable.

Main Outcome Measures: The participants conducted 5 clinical field tests (6-minute walk test, stair test, 30-second sit-to-stand test, handgrip test, fingertip-to-floor test).

Results: The results of the field tests showed that performance remained unchanged until approximately 50 years of age; after that, performance deteriorated with increasing age. Grip strength (79%), meters walked in 6 minutes (60%), and seconds used on the stair test (59%) could be well predicted by age, sex, height, and weight in participants ≥50 years of age, whereas the performance on all tests was less well predicted in participants <50 years of age.

Conclusions: The reference values and reference equations provided in this study may increase the applicability and interpretability of the 6-minute walk test, stair test, 30-second sit-to-stand test, handgrip test, and fingertip-to-floor test in clinical practice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2014.02.016DOI Listing
July 2014

Measuring health-related physical fitness in physiotherapy practice: reliability, validity, and feasibility of clinical field tests and a patient-reported measure.

J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2014 Mar 22;44(3):206-16. Epub 2014 Jan 22.

Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Study Design: A cross-sectional study with a test-retest design.

Objectives: To assess measurement properties of the physical fitness questionnaire, the 6-minute walk test, the stair test, the hand-grip test, the 30-second sit-to-stand test, and the fingertip-to-floor test in patients with various musculoskeletal conditions (MSCs).

Background: Patients suffering from MSCs tend to be more deconditioned and less physically active than healthy people. Physiotherapists should, therefore, focus on health-related physical fitness in addition to their patients' specific MSCs to offer optimal treatment. To enable good decision making, a core set of feasible measures with acceptable measurement properties is needed.

Methods: Eighty-one patients with MSCs (57.6 ± 14.2 years of age) were recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics. Relative reliability was analyzed with intraclass correlation coefficient model 2,1, and absolute reliability with standard error of measurement and smallest detectable change. Construct validity was assessed with a priori hypotheses. Time spent and assistance needed to accomplish the measures were used to assess feasibility.

Results: The 6-minute walk test, the hand-grip test, and the physical fitness questionnaire showed acceptable reliability (49 m, 4 kg, and 2 points, respectively) and construct validity. The stair test showed acceptable reliability (8 seconds) but not validity. The 30-second sit-to-stand test showed acceptable validity but not reliability (4 sit-to-stands), whereas the fingertip-to-floor test showed neither acceptable reliability (9 cm) nor validity.

Conclusion: The 6-minute walk test, the hand-grip test, and the physical fitness questionnaire can be recommended as a core set of reliable and valid measures to assess health-related physical fitness in patients with various MSCs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2519/jospt.2014.5042DOI Listing
March 2014

High intra- and inter-rater chance variation of the movement assessment battery for children 2, ageband 2.

Res Dev Disabil 2013 Feb 5;34(2):795-800. Epub 2012 Dec 5.

Division of Surgery and Clinical Neuroscience, Orthopaedic Dept., Section of Research, Oslo University Hospital, Postal Address Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway.

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intra- and inter-tester reliability of the movement assessment battery for children-second edition (MABC-2), ageband 2. We wanted to analyze the collected data, with adequate statistical methods, to provide relevant recommendations for physical therapists who are interpreting changes in the context of daily clinical practice. Forty-five healthy children, 23 girls and 22 boys with a mean age of 8.7±0.7 years, participated in the study, the inter-tester procedures were performed the same day and the intra-tester procedures within a one to two week interval. The statistical methods used were intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM), and smallest detectable change (SDC). The children had no failed items during the tests. The ICC values ranged from 0.23 to 0.76. The items "treading lace" and "one-board balance" showed the highest measurement errors both for the intra- and inter-rater reliability. The SDC(90%) values were 9.7 and 18.5 for the intra- and inter-rater reliability, respectively. The present study showed high intra- and inter-rater chance variation MABC-2, ageband 2. A change of more than ±9.7 and ±18.5 on the total test score (TTS) should be required to state (with a 90% confidence) that a real change in a single individual has occurred, for intra- and inter-rater testing, respectively. These findings may indicate that the MABC-2 might be more suitable for diagnostic or clinical decision making purposes, than for evaluation of change over time.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2012.11.002DOI Listing
February 2013

Influence of thigh muscle strength and balance on hop length in one-legged hopping in children aged 7-12 years.

Gait Posture 2010 Jun 2;32(2):259-62. Epub 2010 Jun 2.

Division of Rehabilitation, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo, Norway.

Background: Lower extremity muscular strength and balance are essential components in many motor performance skills. One-legged hopping is considered to be the most advanced jumping skill, because it requires greater muscle strength and better balance than other jumping skills. To what degree muscle strength and balance have significant influence on hop length in children is, however, unknown.

Objective: The purpose of the present study was to identify predictive factors for hop length in one-legged hopping. The main hypothesis was that both muscle strength of the thigh (quadriceps and hamstrings) and balance would be significant predictors in healthy children 7-12 years of age.

Method: 341 girls and boys were included in the study. Hopping data was collected using the GAITRite system, muscle strength was tested isokinetically by a Cybex 6000 and one leg static balance was measured by the KAT 2000 system.

Results: Hop length and thigh muscle strength showed increased values from one age group to the next from 7 to 12 years of age, while static balance only showed minor fluctuation. Multiple regression analysis showed that thigh strength, static balance, age and gender all together explained 53.4% of the variance in hop length. Age, quadriceps strength and hamstrings strength made the largest contributions with Beta 0.32, p<0.001, Beta 0.26, p=0.001 and Beta 0.18, p=0.003, respectively. Static balance and gender did not contribute significantly.

Conclusion: Of the measurements investigated in this study, age and thigh muscle strength are the strongest predictors for hop length in one-legged hopping skills in children.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2010.05.009DOI Listing
June 2010

A normative sample of gait and hopping on one leg parameters in children 7-12 years of age.

Gait Posture 2009 Feb 18;29(2):317-21. Epub 2008 Nov 18.

Division of Rehabilitation, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, 0027 Oslo, Norway; Section of Health Science, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1153, Blindern, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Accomplishment of a series of successive hops is an advanced motor skill and requires adequate timing and coordination. Hopping on one leg performance might therefore be a more sensitive test with higher discriminatory power than ordinary gait in evaluating motor competence both in healthy and diseased children.

Objective: The purpose of the study was to develop a normative sample on walking at a normalized speed of 1.5 m/s and hopping on one leg parameters in children 7-12 years of age, and to evaluate the influence of age and gender on the different parameters.

Method: 360 girls and boys between 7 and 12 years participated in the study. All data were collected using the GAITRite system. The children were instructed to walk at four different speeds and to hop on either leg with as long serial jumps as possible across the whole walkway.

Results: There was an increase in absolute step length of 15% from 7 to 12 years of age. However, for normalized step length there was no increase. The total increase in absolute and normalized hop length from 7 to 12 years was 64% and 36%, respectively. Multiple regression analysis displayed a significant increase for absolute and normalized hopping length with age.

Conclusion: While step length only showed a small increase from 7 to 12 years of age, hop length showed significant increase both in absolute and normalized values. The variability, however, was large, indicating that a normative sample of hop length measurements includes a wide range of values for each age group.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2008.09.016DOI Listing
February 2009
-->