Publications by authors named "Anne Sorrell"

5 Publications

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Behavioral and exercise interventions for sleep dysfunction in the elderly: a brief review and future directions.

Sleep Breath 2021 Feb 25. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Department of Psychology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, 27858, USA.

Purpose: The impact of sleep-related changes and disorders in the geriatric populations are of utmost concern due to health consequences and increased risk of injury as well as injuring others as a result of poor sleep. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of the current state of the literature with regard to sleep, aging, common non-pharmacological interventions, and the potential use of exercise in combination with behavioral interventions.

Methods: Initially, this manuscript focuses on a brief (nonsystematic) review of sleep parameters and physiology that are associated with the aging process. Subsequently, information regarding sleep disorders in the elderly in general, and insomnia in particular are discussed. Last, a brief review of current recommended interventions is provided.

Results: The current major nonpharmacological interventions are described including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I). The potential use of exercise as a safe intervention for poor sleep is discussed. Finally, a call is made for increased research that examines the combination of traditional behavioral interventions with exercise.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11325-021-02329-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7905198PMC
February 2021

A Review of Neuronal Pathways Associated With Consciousness.

J Neurosci Nurs 2021 Feb;53(1):39-43

Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Accurate communication of information regarding fluctuations in level of consciousness is critical. It is, important for nurses to understand terms related to consciousness to appropriately assess and implement plans of care. CONTENT: Although the neurobiology of consciousness is complex and multifaceted, consciousness can be conceptualized as having 2 distinct but interrelated dimensions: arousal and awareness. The different levels of consciousness are thought to fall on a continuum ranging from being fully awake to coma. CONCLUSION: This article focuses on the terms of consciousness, awareness, and arousal along with nursing implications where appropriate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JNN.0000000000000559DOI Listing
February 2021

Age Differences in Negative, but Not Positive, Rumination.

J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci 2020 01;75(1):80-84

Department of Psychology, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.

Objectives: The main objective of this study was to determine whether there are age differences in positive and negative repetitive thought (ie, rumination).

Method: Young adults (ages 19-39; n = 114) and older adults (ages 60-85; n = 88) completed measures of negative and positive rumination. Bayesian analyses were used to determine whether age differences were present for both negative (young > old) and positive (old > young) rumination.

Results: There was extremely strong evidence for age differences in negative rumination, with lower scores in older adults. In contrast, the evidence was in favor of the null hypothesis for positive rumination.

Discussion: Age-related positivity is better characterized as decreased dwelling on the meaning of negative moods, rather than increased attention to positive ones.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbz109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6909433PMC
January 2020

Psychometric Properties of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery in Healthy Older Adults: Reliability, Validity, and Agreement with Standard Neuropsychological Tests.

J Int Neuropsychol Soc 2019 09 1;25(8):857-867. Epub 2019 Jul 1.

Department of Neurology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.

Objective: Few independent studies have examined the psychometric properties of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB) in older adults, despite growing interest in its use for clinical purposes. In this paper we report the test-retest reliability and construct validity of the NIHTB-CB, as well as its agreement or concordance with traditional neuropsychological tests of the same construct to determine whether tests could be used interchangeably.

Methods: Sixty-one cognitively healthy adults ages 60-80 completed "gold standard" (GS) neuropsychological tests, NIHTB-CB, and brain MRI. Test-retest reliability, convergent/discriminant validity, and agreement statistics were calculated using Pearson's correlations, concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), and root mean square deviations.

Results: Test-retest reliability was acceptable (CCC = .73 Fluid; CCC = .85 Crystallized). The NIHTB-CB Fluid Composite correlated significantly with cerebral volumes (r's = |.35-.41|), and both composites correlated highly with their respective GS composites (r's = .58-.84), although this was more variable for individual tests. Absolute agreement was generally lower (CCC = .55 Fluid; CCC = .70 Crystallized) due to lower precision in fluid scores and systematic overestimation of crystallized composite scores on the NIHTB-CB.

Conclusions: These results support the reliability and validity of the NIHTB-CB in healthy older adults and suggest that the fluid composite tests are at least as sensitive as standard neuropsychological tests to medial temporal atrophy and ventricular expansion. However, the NIHTB-CB may generate different estimates of performance and should not be treated as interchangeable with established neuropsychological tests.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1355617719000614DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6733640PMC
September 2019

Cocaine Use Reverses Striatal Plasticity Produced During Cocaine Seeking.

Biol Psychiatry 2017 04 13;81(7):616-624. Epub 2016 Sep 13.

Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.

Background: Relapse is a two-component process consisting of a highly motivated drug-seeking phase that, if successful, is followed by a drug-using phase resulting in temporary satiation. In rodents, cue-induced drug seeking requires transient synaptic potentiation (t-SP) of cortical glutamatergic synapses on nucleus accumbens core medium spiny neurons, but it is unknown how achieving drug use affects this plasticity. We modeled the two phases of relapse after extinction from cocaine self-administration to assess how cocaine use affects t-SP associated with cue-induced drug seeking.

Methods: Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (n = 96) or were used as yoked-saline control animals (n = 21). After extinction, reinstatement was initiated by 10 minutes of cue-induced drug seeking, followed by 45 minutes with contingent cocaine access, after which cocaine was discontinued and unreinforced lever pressing ensued. Three measures of t-SP were assayed during reinstatement: dendritic spine morphology, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) ratios, and matrix metalloproteinase activity.

Results: We found that cocaine use for 10 minutes collapsed all three measures of cue-potentiated t-SP back to baseline. Moreover, when cocaine use was discontinued 45 minutes later, dendritic spine morphology and AMPA to NMDA ratios were restored as animals became motivated to engage unrewarded lever pressing. Nonreinforced drug seeking was positively correlated with changes in spine morphology, and cocaine access reversed this relationship.

Conclusions: Using a novel modification of the reinstatement paradigm, we show that achieving cocaine use reversed the synaptic plasticity underpinning the motivation to seek the drug.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2016.08.033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5346331PMC
April 2017