Publications by authors named "Anne Busch"

25 Publications

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Draft Genome Sequence of Persistent Klebsiella grimontii AT013-Mero-001, Isolated from Human Feces.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2021 Apr 22;10(16). Epub 2021 Apr 22.

Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany

Here, we report the draft genome sequence of AT013-Mero-001, which was isolated from feces from a sepsis patient treated with meropenem. This isolate is an antibiotic-susceptible but persistent strain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00054-21DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8063637PMC
April 2021

Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Genomic Analysis of and , Two Rarely Detected Species.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2021 17;11:532989. Epub 2021 Mar 17.

IBIZ, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut Jena, Jena, Germany.

and are two rarely detected species. In the study, we analyzed the antimicrobial susceptibility and provide detailed insights into the genotype and phylogeny of both species using whole-genome sequencing. Thermophilic species are the most common bacterial foodborne pathogens causing gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. The genus is part of the family and includes the species , and the rarely described , and are emergent enteropathogens and potential zoonotic agents. Here, we generated, analyzed, and characterized whole-genome sequences of and They were isolated from water poultry farms in Germany, cultured and identified by MALDI-TOF MS. With PCR the identity was verified. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was carried out with erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, tetracycline, gentamicin, streptomycin, ampicillin, and cefotaxime using the gradient strip method (E-test). Whole-genome sequences were generated including those of reference strains. Complete genomes for six selected strains are reported. These provide detailed insights into the genotype. With these, we predicted known AMR genes, virulence-associated genes, and plasmid replicons. Phenotypic analysis of resistance showed differences between the presence of resistance genes and the prediction of phenotypic resistance profiles. In , the nucleotide sequence of the A gene (DQ464331) can show a signature mutation resulting in an amino acid change T85>I. and showed the same gene as assessed by similarity annotation of the mutations 254C>G. Most of the isolates were found to be sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The ciprofloxacin-resistant isolate was associated with the amino acid change T85>I. But this was not predicted with antibiotic resistance databases, before. Ultimately, a phylogenetic analysis was done to facilitate in future outbreak analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2021.532989DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8010192PMC
March 2021

Newly Isolated Animal Pathogen Is Cytotoxic to Human Epithelial Cells.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Mar 29;22(7). Epub 2021 Mar 29.

Microbiology Division, Department of Biology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany.

is a newly identified animal pathogen of forest animals such as roe deer and wild boars. The species is closely related to the emerging human pathogen and the widely distributed animal pathogen . In this study, strain W25 was characterized with respect to its interaction with human cell lines. Microscopy, measurement of transepithelial electric resistance and cytotoxicity assays revealed detrimental effects of to different human epithelial cell lines and to an invertebrate animal model, larvae, comparable to diphtheria toxin-secreting Furthermore, the results obtained may indicate a considerable zoonotic potential of this newly identified species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22073549DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8037504PMC
March 2021

Comparative in silico genome analysis of Clostridium perfringens unravels stable phylogroups with different genome characteristics and pathogenic potential.

Sci Rep 2021 Mar 24;11(1):6756. Epub 2021 Mar 24.

Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Naumburger Str. 96A, 07743, Jena, Germany.

Clostridium perfringens causes a plethora of devastating infections, with toxin production being the underlying mechanism of pathogenicity in various hosts. Genomic analyses of 206 public-available C. perfringens strains´ sequence data identified a substantial degree of genomic variability in respect to episome content, chromosome size and mobile elements. However, the position and order of the local collinear blocks on the chromosome showed a considerable degree of preservation. The strains were divided into five stable phylogroups (I-V). Phylogroup I contained human food poisoning strains with chromosomal enterotoxin (cpe) and a Darmbrand strain characterized by a high frequency of mobile elements, a relatively small genome size and a marked loss of chromosomal genes, including loss of genes encoding virulence traits. These features might correspond to the adaptation of these strains to a particular habitat, causing human foodborne illnesses. This contrasts strains that belong to phylogroup II where the genome size points to the acquisition of genetic material. Most strains of phylogroup II have been isolated from enteric lesions in horses and dogs. Phylogroups III, IV and V are heterogeneous groups containing a variety of different strains, with phylogroup III being the most abundant (65.5%). In conclusion, C. perfringens displays five stable phylogroups reflecting different disease involvements, prompting further studies on the evolution of this highly important pathogen.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-86148-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7991664PMC
March 2021

Using affinity propagation clustering for identifying bacterial clades and subclades with whole-genome sequences of Francisella tularensis.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2020 09 29;14(9):e0008018. Epub 2020 Sep 29.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Jena, Germany.

By combining a reference-independent SNP analysis and average nucleotide identity (ANI) with affinity propagation clustering (APC), we developed a significantly improved methodology allowing resolving phylogenetic relationships, based on objective criteria. These bioinformatics tools can be used as a general ruler to determine phylogenetic relationships and clustering of bacteria, exemplary done with Francisella (F.) tularensis. Molecular epidemiology of F. tularensis is currently assessed mostly based on laboratory methods and molecular analysis. The high evolutionary stability and the clonal nature makes Francisella ideal for subtyping with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Sequencing and real-time PCR can be used to validate the SNP analysis. We investigate whole-genome sequences of 155 F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates. Phylogenetic testing was based on SNPs and average nucleotide identity (ANI) as reference independent, alignment-free methods taking small-scale and large-scale differences within the genomes into account. Especially the whole genome SNP analysis with kSNP3.0 allowed deciphering quite subtle signals of systematic differences in molecular variation. Affinity propagation clustering (APC) resulted in three clusters showing the known clades B.4, B.6, and B.12. These data correlated with the results of real-time PCR assays targeting canSNPs loci. Additionally, we detected two subtle sub-clusters. SplitsTree was used with standard-setting using the aligned SNPs from Parsnps. Together APC, HierBAPS, and SplitsTree enabled us to generate hypotheses about epidemiologic relationships between bacterial clusters and describing the distribution of isolates. Our data indicate that the choice of the typing technique can increase our understanding of the pathogenesis and transmission of diseases with the eventual for prevention. This is opening perspectives to be applied to other bacterial species. The data provide evidence that Germany might be the collision zone where the clade B.12, also known as the East European clade, overlaps with the clade B.6, also known as the Iberian clade. Described methods allow generating a new, more detailed perspective for F. tularensis subsp. holarctica phylogeny. These results may encourage to determine phylogenetic relationships and clustering of other bacteria the same way.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0008018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7523947PMC
September 2020

Draft genome sequence of multi-resistant subsp. serovar Rissen strain 19CS0416 isolated from Vietnam reveals plasmid mediated resistance to colistin already in 2013.

J Genomics 2020 3;8:76-79. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses (IBIZ), Naumburger Str. 96a, 07743 Jena, Germany.

We report the first draft genome sequence of a strain with plasmid-mediated resistance to colistin encoded by gene in Vietnam. serovar Rissen was isolated from a Vietnamese pig slaughterhouse in 2013. We can confirm that gene is identical to the first reported gene of the strain SHP45, isolated in 2015 from a Chinese pig. The plasmid containing this gene in the strain 19CS0416 was highly related (96.86% identity) to the plasmid (pHNSHP45) contained in this Chinese strain. Moreover, this plasmid was determined to be 100% identical to a plasmid (p13P477T-7) belonging to an (13P477T) found in Hong Kong during the same year in pigs. Our results will aid in understanding the dissemination of gene in East Asia, dating back to as early as 2013.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7150/jgen.42790DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7425045PMC
July 2020

Complete genome and plasmid sequences of a multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama isolate from a German cattle farm.

J Genomics 2020 29;8:71-75. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses (IBIZ), Naumburger Str. 96a, 07743 Jena, Germany.

We describe a rare isolate of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) profile from a German cattle-fattening farm. Applying two next-generation sequencing methods we generated sequences of the genome as well as the plasmids; assembled the draft genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama isolate 18PM0209. Antimicrobial resistance genes, virulence-associated genes and plasmids were analyzed using bioinformatics. Occurrence of multidrug-resistant serovars at cattle-fattening farms indicate the need of enhanced surveillance to prevent further spread of these organisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7150/jgen.48656DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7425046PMC
June 2020

Rapid and Culture Free Identification of in Hare Carcasses by High-Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry Proteotyping.

Front Microbiol 2020 8;11:636. Epub 2020 May 8.

Mass Spectrometry Facility, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Berlin, Germany.

Zoonotic pathogens that can be transmitted via food to humans have a high potential for large-scale emergencies, comprising severe effects on public health, critical infrastructures, and the economy. In this context, the development of laboratory methods to rapidly detect zoonotic bacteria in the food supply chain, including high-resolution mass spectrometry proteotyping are needed. In this work, an optimized sample preparation method for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteome profiling was established for isolates, and a cluster analysis, as well as a phylogenetic tree, was generated to shed light on evolutionary relationships. Furthermore, this method was applied to tissues of infected hare carcasses from Germany. Even though the non-informative data outnumbered by a manifold the information of the zoonotic pathogen in the resulting proteome profiles, the standardized evaluation of MS data within an established automated analysis pipeline identified and, thus, could be, in principle, an applicable method to monitor food supply chains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.00636DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7225524PMC
May 2020

Complete High-Quality Genome Sequence of Clostridium limosum (Hathewaya limosa) Isolate 14S0207, Recovered from a Cow with Suspected Blackleg in Germany.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2020 Jan 9;9(2). Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Jena, Germany

can be found in soil and the intestinal tract of animals. In 2014, was isolated from a suspected blackleg outbreak in cattle in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. We present a complete genome sequence of a strain represented by a circular chromosome and three plasmids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.01487-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6952678PMC
January 2020

Genome sequence of a pathogenic Corynebacterium ulcerans strain isolated from a wild boar with necrotizing lymphadenitis.

BMC Res Notes 2019 Oct 25;12(1):692. Epub 2019 Oct 25.

Institut für Bakterielle Infektionen und Zoonosen, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Bundesforschungsinstitut für Tiergesundheit, Jena, Germany.

Objectives: Corynebacterium ulcerans can colonize a wide variety of animals and also humans are infected, typically by zoonotic transmission. Symptoms range from skin ulcers or systemic infections to diphtheria-like illness. In contrast, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is widely distributed among herds of sheep, goats and other farm animals, where it causes high economic losses due to caseous lymphadenitis. Here we describe the genome sequence of an atypical C. ulcerans strain isolated from a wild boar with necrotizing lymphadenitis. This strain has similarities to C. pseudotuberculosis.

Data Description: Genome sequence data of C. ulcerans isolate W25 were generated, analyzed and taxonomical relationship to other Corynebacterium species as well as growth properties of the isolate were characterized. The genome of C. ulcerans W25 comprises 2,550,924 bp with a G+C content of 54.41% and a total of 2376 genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-019-4704-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6815020PMC
October 2019

Whole-Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. diarizonae Serovar 61:k:1,5,(7) Strain 1569 (14PM0011), Isolated from German Sheep.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2019 Sep 19;8(38). Epub 2019 Sep 19.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses (IBIZ), Jena, Germany

Here, we report the draft genome sequence of subsp. serovar 61:k:1,5,(7) strain 1569, alternatively named 14PM0011, which is a common serovar in German sheep that is unrepresented in the databases and considered and described as being host adapted with low virulence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00539-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6753263PMC
September 2019

Fishing in the Soup - Pathogen Detection in Food Safety Using Metabarcoding and Metagenomic Sequencing.

Front Microbiol 2019 6;10:1805. Epub 2019 Aug 6.

Department of Biological Safety, German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Berlin, Germany.

In food safety the detection of food contaminations with pathogenic microorganisms is a race against time and often outpaced by error-prone epidemiological approaches. For evidence-based outbreak investigations fast and reliable techniques and procedures are required to identify the source of infection. Metagenomics has the potential to become a powerful tool in the field of modern food safety, since it allows the detection, identification and characterization of a broad range of pathogens in a single experiment without pre-cultivation within a couple of days. Nevertheless, sample handling, sequencing and data analysis are challenging and can introduce errors and biases into the analysis. In order to evaluate the potential of metagenomics in food safety, we generated a mock community containing DNA of foodborne bacteria. Herewith, we compare the aptitude of the two prevalent approaches - 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing and whole genome shotgun sequencing - for the detection of foodborne bacteria using different parameters during sample preparation, sequencing and data analysis. 16S rDNA sequencing did not only result in high deviations from the expected sample composition on genus and species level, but more importantly lacked the detection of several pathogenic species. While shotgun sequencing is more suitable for species detection, abundance estimation, genome assembly and species characterization, the performance can vary depending on the library preparation kit, which was confirmed for a naturally contaminated game meat sample. The application of the Nextera XT DNA Library Preparation Kit for shotgun sequencing did not only result in lower reference genome recovery and coverage, but also in distortions of the mock community composition. For data analysis, we propose a publicly available workflow for pathogen detection and characterization and demonstrate its benefits on the usability of metagenomic sequencing in food safety by analyzing an authentic metagenomic sample.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2019.01805DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6691356PMC
August 2019

Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Genomic Structure of Isolates.

Front Microbiol 2018 14;9:3067. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses (IBIZ), Friedrich Loeffler Institute, Jena, Germany.

spp. are considered the most common bacterial cause of foodborne gastroenteritis in the world. The family includes the genus with the three species , , and as emergent enteropathogens and potential zoonotic agents. Here, we characterized genome sequences of that were isolated from water poultry on farms in Germany. Isolates were cultured, identified by MALDI-TOF MS and identification was verified with PCR assays. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of isolates was carried out with erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, tetracycline, gentamicin, and streptomycin using the gradient strip method (-test). We also sequenced whole genomes and predicted antibiotic resistance determinants, virulence factors, performed a phylogenetic analysis to determine the genetic relatedness of these isolates and searched for plasmids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2018.03067DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6302008PMC
December 2018

Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma gallopavonis Type Strain WR1.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2018 Nov 29;7(21). Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses (IBIZ), Jena, Germany.

Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma gallopavonis type strain WR1 (= ATCC 33551 = NCTC 10186), which is a common microorganism in eastern wild turkeys and is considered a nonpathogenic commensal in turkeys.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.01256-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6284725PMC
November 2018

Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus anthracis Strain Sterne 09RA8929.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2018 Oct 11;7(14). Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses, Jena, Germany.

A Bacillus anthracis vaccine strain (Sterne), used as an attenuated laboratory comparative strain, was sequenced and analyzed. A comparison to assemblies of B. anthracis strain Sterne (NZ_CP009541 and NZ_CP009540) was performed. The lack of the pX02 plasmid and pX01 in approximately five copies was confirmed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00972-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6256644PMC
October 2018

Draft Genome Sequence of Taylorella equigenitalis Strain 210217RC10635, Isolated from a Pony Stallion in Germany.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2018 Sep 27;7(12). Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses (IBIZ), Jena, Germany.

Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Taylorella equigenitalis strain 210217RC10635, a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the genus Taylorella and the order Burkholderiales. Taylorella equigenitalis is the causative agent of contagious equine metritis (CEM). The strain reported here was isolated in 2017 from a German stallion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.01112-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6256680PMC
September 2018

Draft Genome Sequence of Riemerella anatipestifer Isolate 17CS0503.

Genome Announc 2018 May 17;6(20). Epub 2018 May 17.

Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses at the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Jena, Germany.

is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the family It is primarily associated with acute septicemia in younger birds. The isolate 17CS0503 described here was isolated from a Peking duck () in Hannover, Germany, in 1999.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.00274-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5958266PMC
May 2018

Revisiting subsp. , Causative Agent of Tularemia in Germany With Bioinformatics: New Insights in Genome Structure, DNA Methylation and Comparative Phylogenetic Analysis.

Front Microbiol 2018 13;9:344. Epub 2018 Mar 13.

Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Jena, Germany.

() is a highly virulent, Gram-negative bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of the zoonotic disease tularemia. Here, we generated, analyzed and characterized a high quality circular genome sequence of the subsp. strain 12T0050 that caused fatal tularemia in a hare. Besides the genomic structure, we focused on the analysis of oriC, unique to the genus and regulating replication in and outside hosts and the first report on genomic DNA methylation of a strain. The high quality genome was used to establish and evaluate a diagnostic whole genome sequencing pipeline. A genotyping strategy for was developed using various bioinformatics tools for genotyping. Additionally, whole genome sequences of subsp. isolates isolated in the years 2008-2015 in Germany were generated. A phylogenetic analysis allowed to determine the genetic relatedness of these isolates and confirmed the highly conserved nature of subsp.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2018.00344DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5859110PMC
March 2018

High-Quality Genome Sequence of Strain 14RA5914 Isolated during an Outbreak in Germany in 2014.

Genome Announc 2017 Oct 5;5(40). Epub 2017 Oct 5.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses, Jena, Germany.

is a zoonotic agent causing anthrax, a notifiable disease in animals. The last anthrax outbreak among cattle in Germany occurred in April 2014 in Saxony-Anhalt. Here we report a high-quality genome sequence of the strain 14RA5914 Dobichau isolated from the spleen of a dead cow.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.01002-17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5629050PMC
October 2017

Pregnancy reduces the perception of anxiety.

Sci Rep 2017 08 23;7(1):9213. Epub 2017 Aug 23.

Department of Experimental Psychology, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, D-40225, Düsseldorf, Germany.

In humans, stress can be contagiously transmitted via chemosignals on a subconscious level. This study investigates how pregnancy affects neural responses to anxiety chemosignals. Using cotton pads, 28 men donated axillary sweat immediately before an academic examination (anxiety sweat) and during ergometer training (control). Via a constant-flow olfactometer, samples were presented (oddball paradigm) to 12 non-pregnant (NP) women, 14 women in their first (T1), and 18 in their third (T3) trimester of pregnancy. Chemosensory event-related potentials and current source densities (CSD) were analysed (60 electrode setup). Compared to NP-women, pregnant women display diminished evaluative processing of the sweat samples (targets; P3-1/ P3-2 amplitudes) and delayed evaluative processing of the anxiety sweat (targets; P3-2 latency). T3-women show attenuated early processing (targets; N1 amplitude) compared to NP-women, and reduced evaluative processing compared to T1-women (standards; P3-2 amplitude). CSDs (P3-1/ P3-2 latency ranges) reveal that T1- and T3-women show an atypical activation distribution to anxiety sweat. Most participants were unable to detect the sweat samples (anxiety sweat: 79.5%, sport sweat 88.6%). The results demonstrate that the processing of anxiety chemosignals progressively vanishes during pregnancy. This effect is likely to occur without any cognitive control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-07985-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5569070PMC
August 2017

High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of subsp. Strain 08T0073 Isolated from a Wild European Hare.

Genome Announc 2017 Mar 23;5(12). Epub 2017 Mar 23.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses, Jena, Germany.

Here, we report a high-quality draft genome sequence of subsp. strain 08T0073, isolated from the cadaver of a wild European hare () found near Helmstedt, Lower Saxony, Germany, in 2007. In Germany, infected hares are a major source of tularemia in humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.01577-16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5364228PMC
March 2017

Chemosensory anxiety signals prime defensive behavior in prepubertal girls.

Physiol Behav 2017 05 21;173:30-33. Epub 2017 Jan 21.

Department of Experimental Psychology, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Germany.

Chemosensory anxiety signals effectively prime motor responses related to withdrawal behavior, such as the startle reflex, in adult humans. As the reproductive status strongly affects the response to social chemosignals, the current study examined whether chemosensory anxiety signals would augment the startle response in prepubertal children as it does in adults. Using cotton pads, axillary sweat was collected from 28 men while waiting for an important oral examination (anxiety condition), and during ergometer training (sport control condition). Using a constant-flow olfactometer, sweat samples and pure cotton samples (cotton control) were presented to 10 prepubertal girls aged 9-13years (M=11.25, SD=1.25) for 3000ms during inhalation. White noise bursts of 102dB(A) served as startle probes, and startle responses were recorded via electromyography of the orbicularis oculi muscle. The girls showed larger startle amplitudes to probes presented in the context of chemosensory anxiety signals as compared to a context of sport control sweat (p<0.01) as well as cotton control (p<0.05). This effect was not attributable to differences in stimulus detection rates or stimulus hedonics. The results show that in prepubertal girls, similar to adults, chemosensory anxiety signals prime defensive motor behavior. This effect appears unrelated to the odorous quality of anxiety sweat, but seems to reflect a specific preparedness to respond to the underlying social alarm signal. Thus, chemosensory communication supporting individual harm protection is independent of the reproductive status in humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.01.035DOI Listing
May 2017

Proteome analysis of maternal serum samples for trisomy 21 pregnancies using ProteinChip arrays and bioinformatics.

J Histochem Cytochem 2005 Mar;53(3):341-3

Core Unit Chip Application (CUCA), Inst. of Human Genetics and Anthropology, Friedrich Schiller University, D-07740 Jena, Germany.

A surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF)-based ProteinChip System was used as a tool for rapid discovery and identification of protein patterns in serum that discriminate between trisomy 21 and unaffected pregnancies. We analyzed 24 serum samples from women carrying a trisomy 21 pregnancy and 32 with an unaffected pregnancy, ranging from 10.0 to 14.0 weeks of gestation. The resulting protein profiles were submitted to a clustering algorithm, a rule extraction, a rating, and a rule base construction step. For the generated combined rule base, the specificity and sensitivity for the prediction of a trisomy 21 pregnancy reach 97% and 91%, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1369/jhc.4B6377.2005DOI Listing
March 2005

Mutant huntingtin promotes the fibrillogenesis of wild-type huntingtin: a potential mechanism for loss of huntingtin function in Huntington's disease.

J Biol Chem 2003 Oct 29;278(42):41452-61. Epub 2003 Jul 29.

Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Ihnestrasse 73, D-14195, Berlin, Germany.

Aggregation of huntingtin (htt) in neuronal inclusions is associated with the development of Huntington's disease (HD). Previously, we have shown that mutant htt fragments with polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts in the pathological range (>37 glutamines) form SDS-resistant aggregates with a fibrillar morphology, whereas wild-type htt fragments with normal polyQ domains do not aggregate. In this study we have investigated the co-aggregation of mutant and wild-type htt fragments. We found that mutant htt promotes the aggregation of wild-type htt, causing the formation of SDS-resistant co-aggregates with a fibrillar morphology. Conversely, mutant htt does not promote the fibrillogenesis of the polyQ-containing protein NOCT3 or the polyQ-binding protein PQBP1, although these proteins are recruited into inclusions containing mutant htt aggregates in mammalian cells. The formation of mixed htt fibrils is a highly selective process that not only depends on polyQ tract length but also on the surrounding amino acid sequence. Our data suggest that mutant and wild-type htt fragments may also co-aggregate in neurons of HD patients and that a loss of wild-type htt function may contribute to HD pathogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M303354200DOI Listing
October 2003

Functional characterization of cysteine residues in GlpT, the glycerol 3-phosphate transporter of Escherichia coli.

J Bacteriol 2003 Jul;185(13):3863-70

Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins Medical School, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.

In Escherichia coli, the GlpT transporter, a member of the major facilitator superfamily, moves external glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) into the cytoplasm in exchange for cytoplasmic phosphate. Study of intact cells showed that both GlpT and HisGlpT, a variant with an N-terminal six-histidine tag, are inhibited (50% inhibitory concentration approximately 35 microM) by the hydrophilic thiol-specific agent p-mercurichlorobenzosulfonate (PCMBS) in a substrate-protectable fashion; by contrast, two other thiol-directed probes, N-maleimidylpropionylbiocytin (MPB) and [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSET), have no effect. Use of variants in which the HisGlpT native cysteines are replaced individually by serine or glycine implicates Cys-176, on transmembrane helix 5 (TM5), as the major target for PCMBS. The inhibitor sensitivity of purified and reconstituted HisGlpT or its cysteine substitution derivatives was found to be consistent with the findings with intact cells, except that a partial response to PCMBS was found for the C176G mutant, suggesting the presence of a mixed population of both right-side-out (RSO) (resistant) and inside-out (ISO) (sensitive) orientations after reconstitution. To clarify this issue, we studied a derivative (P290C) in which the RSO molecules can be blocked independently due to an MPB-responsive cysteine in an extracellular loop. In this derivative, comparisons of variants with (P290C) and without (P290C/C176G) Cys-176 indicated that this residue shows substrate-protectable inhibition by PCMBS in the ISO orientation in proteoliposomes. Since PCMBS gains access to Cys-176 from both periplasmic and cytoplasmic surfaces of the protein (in intact cells and in a reconstituted ISO orientation, respectively) and since access is unavailable when the substrate is present, we propose that Cys-176 is located on the transport pathway and that TM5 has a role in lining this pathway.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC161592PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jb.185.13.3863-3870.2003DOI Listing
July 2003