Publications by authors named "Anna Urso"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Okada Purifying Therapy in combination with duloxetine vs. duloxetine alone in patients with TMD and fibromyalgia: a randomized clinical study.

J Complement Integr Med 2020 Dec 31. Epub 2020 Dec 31.

Department of Oral and Maxillo-facial Sciences, Gnathologic Division "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome (RM), Italy.

Objectives: This randomized study was aimed at evaluating the additional analgesic effect of Okada Purifying Therapy (OPT) when administered in combination with duloxetine in patients with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs) and Fibromyalgia (FM).

Methods: Patients with TMDs visited at Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome who were diagnosed with FM were selected for the study. The final sample was composed of 31 patients: 15 patients were treated only with duloxetine (Group I) and 16 patients underwent also OPT treatment (Group II), for eight weeks. Craniomandibular index, total tenderness score, Brief Pain Inventory Modified Short Form, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory and State and Trait Anxiety Inventory-1 were assessed at the beginning (T0), during the course (T1) and after therapy (T2). Descriptive and inferential statistics were performed.

Results: In all the data analyzed, both groups showed an improvement in particular between T0 and T1. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups during the trial, except for the interaction between treatment and time as to the ability of walking at the BPI-I (F=7.57, p=0.002). No side effects due to the duloxetine were recorded in group II compared to group I.

Conclusion: The additional complementary treatment (OPT) did not appear to give the patients with TMDs and FM any further benefit but it might improve pharmacological tolerability of the traditional medication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jcim-2020-0116DOI Listing
December 2020

Boundary condition controls on the high-sand-flux regions of Mars.

Geology 2019 May 11;47(5):427-430. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA.

Wind has been an enduring geologic agent throughout the history of Mars, but it is often unclear where and why sediment is mobile in the current epoch. We investigated whether eolian bed-form (dune and ripple) transport rates are depressed or enhanced in some areas by local or regional boundary conditions (e.g., topography, sand supply/availability). Bedform heights, migration rates, and sand fluxes all span two to three orders of magnitude across Mars, but we found that areas with the highest sand fluxes are concentrated in three regions: Syrtis Major, Hellespontus Montes, and the north polar erg. All regions are located near prominent transition zones of topography (e.g., basins, polar caps) and thermophysical properties (e.g., albedo variations); these are not known to be critical terrestrial boundary conditions. The two regions adjacent to major impact basins (Hellas and Isidis Planitia) showed radially outward upslope winds driving sand movement, although seasonally reversing wind regimes were also observed. The northern polar dunes yielded the highest known fluxes on the planet, driven by summer katabatic winds modulated by the seasonal CO cap retreat-processes not known to affect terrestrial dunes. In contrast, southern dune fields (<45°S) were less mobile, likely as a result of seasonal frost and ground ice suppressing sand availability. Results suggest that, unlike on Earth, large-scale topographic and thermophysical variabilities play a leading role in driving sand fluxes on Mars.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/g45793.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7241575PMC
May 2019

Application of a Systematic Protocol in the Treatment of TMDs With Occlusal Appliances: Effectiveness and Efficiency in a Longitudinal Retrospective Study With Medium-Term Follow-Up.

J Int Soc Prev Community Dent 2019 Jul-Aug;9(4):372-382. Epub 2019 Aug 6.

Gnathologic Division, Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Objectives: This study aimed to assess effectiveness, efficiency, and feasibility of a systematic protocol for the choice and management of occlusal splints (OA) in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs).

Materials And Methods: A longitudinal retrospective study was conducted. Two different samples, G1 + G2 (337 patients), between January 2011 and January 2014, were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. G1 was composed of patients visited at Policlinico Umberto I, Head-Neck Department, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, and patients in G2 visited at a private structure in Rome. Pain records and functionality were compared before (T0) and at the end of therapy (T1). A follow-up group, composed of 100 patients randomly selected among those who completed treatment for at least 1 year (T2), was analyzed and symptomatology records were compared. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed.

Results: In the entire sample, joint and muscular pain, joint noises and mandibular functionality, headache, and neck pain improved from T0 to T2. The average time for articular and muscular recovery was 6.4 months. Comparing treatment outcomes, there were not statistically significant differences between the two groups.

Conclusions: Treatment outcomes using this setting of protocol showed a positive trend also in the medium term. The use of a systematic protocol seems to reduce operator-dependent factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jispcd.JISPCD_106_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6714422PMC
August 2019

Aeolian dune sediment flux heterogeneity in Meridiani Planum, Mars.

Aeolian Res 2017 Jun 5;26:73-88. Epub 2016 Oct 5.

Carl Sagan Center at the SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Ave, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA.

It is now known unambiguously that wind-driven bedform activity is occurring on the surface of Mars today, including early detections of active sand dunes in Meridiani Planum's Endeavour crater. Many of these reports are only based on a few sets of observations of relatively isolated bedforms and lack regional context. Here, we investigate aeolian activity across central Meridiani Planum and test the hypothesis that dune sites surrounding Endeavour crater are also active and part of region-wide sediment migration driven by northwesterly winds. All 13 dune fields investigated clearly showed evidence for activity and the majority exhibited dune migration (average rates of 0.6 m/Earth-year). Observations indicate substantial geographic and temporal heterogeneity of dune crest fluxes across the area and per site. Locations with multiple time steps indicate dune sand fluxes can vary by a factor of five, providing evidence for short periods of rapid migration followed by near-stagnation. In contrast, measurements at other sites are nearly identical, indicating that some dunes are in a steady-state as they migrate. The observed sediment transport direction was consistent with a regional northeasterly-to-northwesterly wind regime, revealing more variations than were appreciated from earlier, more localized studies. Craters containing shallow, degraded, flat-floored interiors tended to have dunes with high sediment fluxes/activity, whereas local kilometer-scale topographic obstructions (e.g., central peaks, yardangs) were found to be inversely correlated with dune mobility. Finally, the previous, more limited detections of dune activity in Endeavour crater have been shown to be representative of a broader, region-wide pattern of dune motion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aeolia.2016.07.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5863747PMC
June 2017

Wind-Driven Erosion and Exposure Potential at Mars 2020 Rover Candidate-Landing Sites.

J Geophys Res Planets 2018 Feb 8;123(2):468-488. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.

Aeolian processes have likely been the predominant geomorphic agent for most of Mars' history and have the potential to produce relatively young exposure ages for geologic units. Thus, identifying local evidence for aeolian erosion is highly relevant to the selection of landing sites for future missions, such as the Mars 2020 Rover mission that aims to explore astrobiologically relevant ancient environments. Here we investigate wind-driven activity at eight Mars 2020 candidate-landing sites to constrain erosion potential at these locations. To demonstrate our methods, we found that contemporary dune-derived abrasion rates were in agreement with rover-derived exhumation rates at Gale crater and could be employed elsewhere. The Holden crater candidate site was interpreted to have low contemporary erosion rates, based on the presence of a thick sand coverage of static ripples. Active ripples at the Eberswalde and southwest Melas sites may account for local erosion and the dearth of small craters. Moderate-flux regional dunes near Mawrth Vallis were deemed unrepresentative of the candidate site, which is interpreted to currently be experiencing low levels of erosion. The Nili Fossae site displayed the most unambiguous evidence for local sand transport and erosion, likely yielding relatively young exposure ages. The downselected Jezero crater and northeast Syrtis sites had high-flux neighboring dunes and exhibited substantial evidence for sediment pathways across their ellipses. Both sites had relatively high estimated abrasion rates, which would yield young exposure ages. The downselected Columbia Hills site lacked evidence for sand movement, and contemporary local erosion rates are estimated to be relatively low.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2017JE005460DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5859260PMC
February 2018

Dune-Yardang Interactions in Becquerel Crater, Mars.

J Geophys Res Planets 2018 9;123(2):353-368. Epub 2018 Jan 9.

INAF, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, Teramo, Italy.

Isolated landscapes largely shaped by aeolian processes can occur on Earth, while the majority of Mars' recent history has been dominated by wind-driven activity. Resultantly, Martian landscapes often exhibit large-scale aeolian features, including yardang landforms carved from sedimentary-layered deposits. High-resolution orbital monitoring has revealed that persistent bedform activity is occurring with dune and ripple migration implying ongoing abrasion of the surface. However, little is known about the interaction between dunes and the topography surrounding them. Here we explore dune-yardang interactions in Becquerel crater in an effort to better understand local landscape evolution. Dunes there occur on the north and south sides of a 700 m tall sedimentary deposit, which displays numerous superposed yardangs. Dune and yardang orientations are congruent, suggesting that they both were formed under a predominantly northerly wind regime. Migration rates and sediment fluxes decrease as dunes approach the deposit and begin to increase again downwind of the deposit where the effect of topographic sheltering decreases. Estimated sand abrasion rates (16-40 μm yr) would yield a formation time of 1.8-4.5 Myr for the 70 m deep yardangs. This evidence for local aeolian abrasion also helps explain the young exposure ages of deposit surfaces, as estimated by the crater size-frequency distribution. Comparisons to terrestrial dune activity and yardang development begin to place constraints on yardang formation times for both Earth and Mars. These results provide insight into the complexities of sediment transport on uneven terrain and are compelling examples of contemporary aeolian-driven landscape evolution on Mars.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2017JE005465DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5857962PMC
January 2018

Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients.

Pain Res Manag 2017 21;2017:3203027. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD's symptoms. . A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence/absence of headache: Group with Headache (GwH) and Group without Headache (GwoH). Descriptive statistics and Chi-square index were performed. . Sociodemographic (gender, marital status, and occupation) and functional factors, occlusion (occlusal and skeletal classes, dental formula, and occlusal abnormalities), and familiar pain did not show a statistically significant correlation in either group. Intensity and frequency of neck pain, arthralgia of TMJ, and myalgia showed higher correlation values in GwH. . This study is consistent with previous literature in showing a close relationship between headache and TMD. All data underlines that headache makes pain parameters more intense and frequent. Therefore, an early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMDs should be performed in order to avoid the overlay of painful events that could result in pain chronicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/3203027DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5379086PMC
April 2017

Headache and temporo mandibular disorders: epidemiological assessment.

Minerva Stomatol 2016 Apr;65(2):85-92

Service of Clinical Gnathology (SoCG), Head-Neck Assistance Department, Umberto I Polyclinic, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy -

Background: Temporo mandibular disorders (TMDs) and headache are closely related pathologies. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, incidence, and the intensity of headache in 3304 dysfunctional patients (G1) at the Service of Clinical Gnathology of the Head-Neck Assistance Department of Umberto I Polyclinic at Sapienza University of Rome.

Methods: G1 is composed by two subgroups of patient S1 (N.=2375) and S2 (N.=929) analyzed in different periods, respectively 1996-2006 and 2011-2013. The findings were compared with those of a control group of subjects from the general Italian population recently reported elsewhere. The prevalence of headache in the dysfunctional population was analyzed by calculating the proportion of that population who tested positive to cephalic pain for the entire study period. The incidence of headache has been calculated by determining the proportion cases of headache in TMD population, during the period analyzed among those considered at risk at the beginning of the examination period. The intensity of cephalic pain was evaluated using the Verbal Numeric Scale. Confidence Intervals (CI) at the 95% confidence level were calculated to get a precise estimate of research data.

Results: Comparison of G1 and control sample did not reveal many important differences, respectively with a headache prevalence of 49.5% (95%CI 47.8%-51.2%) and 42.8%(95%CI 46.8-38.8%). However, comparison of S1, which constituted a sample similar in numbers to the control sample and was observed during a similar time period, revealed a clearly greater prevalence of headache in the dysfunctional population 67.3% (95%CI 64.3-70.3%) than in the general representative population of Italian people 42.8% (95%CI 46.8-38.8%). The incidence of headache in the dysfunctional population was 39.49% (95%CI 37.79-41.19%). Headache incidence in the first subgroup (S1) was 32.7%(95%CI 34.6-30.8%), while in S2 was 59.24%(95%CI 56.24-62.24%), demonstrating an increase of incidence in the second subgroup analyzed. In G1 the average intensity of headache was severe (VNS>50). Headache is more intense in dysfunctional patients of the second subgroups (S2) than the first subgroup (S1) VNS 24.91 (95%CI 23.11-26.71) vs. 70.00 (95%CI 67.0-73.0).

Conclusions: These findings confirm the existence of a relationship between headache and TMDs, showing that a dysfunctional patient has a greater predisposition to headache than a non-dysfunctional subject.
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April 2016

[Computerized medical records in monitoring hypertension. Longitudinal and horizontal evaluation of 25 general practitioners in a primary care setting of Modena, Italy].

Recenti Prog Med 2009 Jan;100(1):4-8

CeVEAS (Centro Valutazione Efficacia Assistenza Sanitaria), AUSL Modena.

This study aims at evaluating the effectiveness of a computerized-based Clinical Record in monitoring hypertension in a Primary Care Setting. Blood pressure (BP) recording increased by 62% to 70% in the years 2004 to 2006. No improvement, however, was noticeable in the achievement of gold-standard targets in BP control (62% in all period). At the end of 2006 BP was recorded in 65% of patients. Among them, 2/3 of the non diabetics reached < 140/90 mmHg standard, while only 23% of diabetics reached < 130/80 mmHg standard. In conclusion, using a computerized clinical record appears not to be sufficient to obtain good clinical performances, yet it is a necessary first step to clinical audit.
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January 2009