Publications by authors named "Anna Maria Berardi"

3 Publications

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Embodiment of intersubjective time: relational dynamics as attractors in the temporal coordination of interpersonal behaviors and experiences.

Front Psychol 2014 31;5:1180. Epub 2014 Oct 31.

PErSEUs, Université de Lorraine Metz, France.

This paper addresses the issue of "being together," and more specifically the issue of "being together in time." We provide with an integrative framework that is inspired by phenomenology, the enactive approach and dynamical systems theories. To do so, we first define embodiment as a living and lived phenomenon that emerges from agent-world coupling. We then show that embodiment is essentially dynamical and therefore we describe experiential, behavioral and brain dynamics. Both lived temporality and the temporality of the living appear to be complex, multiscale phenomena. Next we discuss embodied dynamics in the context of interpersonal interactions, and briefly review the empirical literature on between-persons temporal coordination. Overall, we propose that being together in time emerges from the relational dynamics of embodied interactions and their flexible co-regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01180DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4215825PMC
November 2014

Sustained attention in mild Alzheimer's disease.

Dev Neuropsychol 2005 ;28(1):507-37

Department of Psychology, University of Metz, France.

The vigilance decrement in perceptual sensitivity was examined in 10 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 20 age-matched controls. A visual high-event rate digit-discrimination task lasting 7.2 min. (six 1.2 min blocks) was presented at different levels of stimulus degradation. Previous studies have shown that sensitivity decrements (d') over time at high-stimulus degradation result from demands on effortful processing. For all degradation levels, the overall level of vigilance (d') was lower in AD patients than in controls. All participants showed sensitivity decrement over blocks, with greater decrement at higher degradation levels. AD patients exhibited greater sensitivity decrement over time at the highest degradation level they all could perform relative to control participants. There were no concomitant changes in either response bias (C) or response times. The results indicate that mild AD patients have overall lower levels of vigilance under conditions that require both automatic and effortful processing. Mild AD patients also exhibit a deficit in the maintenance of vigilance over time under effortful processing conditions. Although the sample of AD patients was small, results further suggest that both possible and probable AD patients had greater sensitivity decrement over time at the highest degradation level than did control participants, but only probable AD patients had lower overall levels of vigilance. In the possible AD patients as a group, the decrement in vigilance occurred in the absence of concurrent deficits on standard attentional tasks, such as the Stroop and Trail Making tests, suggesting that deficits in vigilance over time may appear earlier than deficits in selective attention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15326942dn2801_4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2383280PMC
September 2005

Individual differences in subjective and objective alertness during sleep deprivation are stable and unrelated.

Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 Feb;284(2):R280-90

Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA.

This study examines the individual reproducibility of alterations of subjective, objective, and EEG measures of alertness during 27 h of continuous wakefulness and analyzes their interrelationships. Eight subjects were studied twice under similar constant-routine conditions. Scales and performance tasks were administered at hourly intervals to define temporal changes in subjective and objective alertness. The wake EEG was recorded every 2 h, 2 min with eyes open and 2 min with eyes closed. Plasma glucose and melatonin levels were measured to estimate brain glucose utilization and individual circadian phase, respectively. Decrements of subjective alertness and performance deficits were found to be highly reproducible for a given individual. Remarkably, there was no relationship between the impairments of subjective and objective alertness. With increased duration of wakefulness, EEG activity with eyes closed increased in the delta range and decreased in the alpha range, but the magnitudes of these changes were also unrelated. These findings indicate that sleep deprivation has highly reproducible, but independent, effects on brain mechanisms controlling subjective and objective alertness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.00197.2002DOI Listing
February 2003