Publications by authors named "Anna Krawczyńska"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Early induction intensification with cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone (CLAM) in AML patients treated with the DAC induction regimen: a prospective, non-randomized, phase II study of the Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG).

Leuk Lymphoma 2020 03 29;61(3):588-603. Epub 2019 Oct 29.

Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

We present the results of a prospective, non-randomized phase 2 trial in which 253 AML patients (pts) under 60 years old received DAC (Daunorubicin + AraC + Cladribine) as first induction followed by CLAM (Cladribine + AraC + Mitoxantrone) as early second induction on day 16 based on bone marrow (BM) blasts on day 14 (D14). The CR/CRi rate after a single course of DAC was 83% for pts with D14 BM blasts less than 10%. Forty-six pts had >10% BM blasts on D14, of whom 35 received CLAM with rates of CR/CRi 60% and early death (ED) 23%. The remaining 11 pts were not fit to receive CLAM, with rates of CR/CRi 28%, PR 18%, and ED 18%. Median OS was 7.2 versus 7.5 months, respectively. The overall CR/CRi rate was 77% after the first induction, with final CR/CRi rate 80% after DAC reinduction for pts who achieved PR with initial DAC course. CLAM used as early second induction might improve CR/CRi rates for younger AML pts with poor early response to DAC induction, but may be associated with higher mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428194.2019.1678151DOI Listing
March 2020

Angiopoietins in haematopoietic stem cell mobilisation in patients with haematological malignancies.

Blood Transfus 2015 Jan 12;13(1):102-8. Epub 2014 Sep 12.

Department of Haematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

Background: The bone marrow niche contains different types of cells including osteoblasts and endothelial progenitors, all of which interact and take part in the process of mobilisation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the levels of cytokines (osteopontin and angiopoietins 1 and 2) active in the bone marrow niche during the mobilisation of haematopoietic stem cells for autologous transplantation.

Materials And Methods: Forty-eight patients (24 females, 24 males), median age 56.5 years, entered the study. The group consisted of patients with multiple myeloma (n=34), lymphoma (n=13) and acute myeloid leukaemia (n=1). Blood samples were collected before chemotherapy and on the day of the first apheresis. Cytokines were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Additionally, circulating endothelial cells were assessed by flow cytometry.

Results: The median concentration of angiopoietin 1 at the time of apheresis was lower than that at baseline (2.7 vs 7.8 ng/mL, p<0.001). In contrast, the median level of angiopoietin 2 increased during the mobilisation procedure (3.6 vs 2.8 ng/mL, p=0.001). The patients were divided according to the number of days of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment before the first apheresis into "early" (median) mobilisers. The group of "early mobilisers" had higher baseline angiopoietin 1 levels (median=11.6 ng/mL) than those of the "late mobilisers" (median=6.0 ng/mL, p=0.05). An adverse correlation was observed between duration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment and baseline angiopoietin 1 level. Baseline angiopoietin 1 levels correlated with numbers of circulating endothelial cells. Low angiopoietin 2 level increased the chance of poor mobilisation.

Conclusions: The angiogenic processes can influence the timing of mobilisation. Angiopoietins 1 and 2 need further evaluation in the context of mobilisation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2450/2014.0002-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4317096PMC
January 2015

The kinetics of hematopoietic niche cytokines and their influence on mobilization efficacy and timing in patients with hematological malignancies.

J Clin Apher 2015 Aug 29;30(4):247-51. Epub 2014 Oct 29.

Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

The bone marrow niche functions are modulated by complicated cytokines network. The aim of our study was to evaluate the levels of VCAM-1, VEGF, MMP-9 and SDF during mobilization of CD34+ cells in patients with hematological malignancies. Thirty four patients were enrolled to the study (19F, 15 M) at median age of 57 years. The group consisted of patients with multiple myeloma (26) and lymphoma (8). The mobilization procedures comprised chemotherapy and then G-CSF. Blood samples were collected before chemotherapy (N = 34) and on the day of the first apheresis (N = 26). Cytokines were evaluated with ELISA assay. We observed significant increase in VCAM-1 levels during mobilization. On contrary, VEGF and SDF levels decreased during mobilization procedure. The levels of MMP-9 were stable during mobilization. We divided patients according to baseline cytokines levels below and above median into "low" and "high" expressors. The group of VEGF "low" expressors had longer median time of G-CSF treatment before first apheresis than 'high' expressors. Baseline VEGF levels correlated adversely with duration of G-CSF treatment before first apheresis. Patients were also divided according to median cytokines levels at apheresis into "low" and "high" expressors. "High" VCAM-1 expressors had higher CD34+in peripheral blood as well as higher CD34+numbers collected during first apheresis than "low" expressors. In conclusion, the levels of niche cytokines change significantly during mobilization in patients with hematopoietic malignancies. Baseline VEGF can influence timing of mobilization. Higher VCAM-1 corresponds with higher mobilization efficacy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jca.21369DOI Listing
August 2015

Polymorphism of CD44 influences the efficacy of CD34(+) cells mobilization in patients with hematological malignancies.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2014 Jul 27;20(7):986-91. Epub 2014 Mar 27.

Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

In the last decade, peripheral blood was the main source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for autologous and allogeneic transplantation. The exact mechanisms of HSC mobilization are still not clear and the efficacy of the procedure is hardly predictable. Ligand-receptor interactions of adhesion molecules, such as SDF1/CXCR4, VLA4/VCAM-1, or CD44/osteopontin, play an important role in homing of HSC in the hematopoietic niche. There is some evidence that disruption of the ligand-receptor complex leads to the egress of HSCs to the peripheral blood. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of constitutive polymorphism of genes encoding cytokines and receptors present in the HSC niche and their impact on the efficacy of mobilization of HSCs in patients with hematological malignancies. We enrolled 110 patients (60 females and 50 males) in the study. The median age of the patients was 55 (range, 22 to 69) years. The group consisted of patients with multiple myeloma (n = 74), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 19), Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 15), or acute myeloid leukemia (n = 2). The mobilization procedures comprised chemotherapy and subsequent granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 10 μg/kg daily. The poor mobilizers group was defined according to Italian National Bone Marrow Transplant Registry criteria: patients with peak CD34(+) in the peripheral blood < 20/μL or total yield < 2 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg body weight in maximum 3 aphereses. Genotyping was performed using standard PCR-based assays. The group of patients (N = 108) who achieved minimal threshold for collections (CD34(+) at least 10/μL) proceeded to apheresis. The median total yield of CD34(+) in this group was 5.6 × 10(6) cells/kg body weight, whereas the median number of cells collected during the first apheresis was 3.3 × 10(6) cells/kg body weight. Median number of days of G-CSF treatment before first apheresis was 10. Fifteen patients fulfilled the criteria for poor mobilizer. The group of poor mobilizers had higher frequency of TT genotype in rs13347 (CD44) gene (CC+ CT versus TT P = .047). Patients homozygous for T allele had a lower total yield of CD34(+) cells/kg body weight than the group with allele C (median, 3.7 × 10(6)/kg versus 5.8 × 10(6)/kg; P = .019) and a lower number of CD34(+) cells gathered during first apheresis (.95 × 10(6)/kg versus 3.3 × 10(6)/kg, P = .04). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the CD44 TT genotype was the only factor associated with 5-fold higher risk of poor mobilization (P = .037). Polymorphic variants of CXCR4 and VCAM-1 did not significantly influence the efficacy of HSCs mobilization in our group of patients. In conclusion, our results indicate that among investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), only CD44 rs13347 has an impact on the efficacy of HSCs mobilization in patients with hematologic malignancies. CD44 SNPs analysis may be helpful for predicting the poor mobilizers population who may benefit from newer modalities using adhesion molecules inhibitors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2014.03.019DOI Listing
July 2014

Circulating endothelial cell kinetics and their potential predictive value during mobilization procedure.

J Clin Apher 2013 Oct 16;28(5):341-8. Epub 2013 May 16.

Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

Objective: Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in patients with hematological malignancies are assessed as a noninvasive marker of angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the numbers of CECs and their subsets during mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells.

Patients And Methods: Thirty-eight patients were enrolled to the study (19 females and 19 males) at median age of 56.5 years. The group consisted of patients with multiple myeloma (26), lymphoma (10), and acute myeloid leukemia (2). Blood samples were collected before chemotherapy (0), 1 day after chemotherapy (Cht+1), on the day G-CSF commenced (G0), after 1 day of G-CSF (G+1), and on the day of the first apheresis. CECs were evaluated by four-color flow cytometry. Circulating progenitor cells were defined as CD45-/CD34+/CD31+/CD133+. Apoptotic CECs (ApoCECs) were defined as CD146+/AnnexinV+.

Results: Median (Me) CECs number was 10.5/µl and it decreased after chemotherapy (Me = 8.3/µl, P < 0.001 when compared with baseline). Based on the number of aphereses needed to obtain 2 × 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells, patients were divided into "highly efficient" (one apheresis) and "poorly efficient" mobilizers (two or more aphereses). Median ApoCEC at Day G+1 was lower in highly efficient than in poorly efficient mobilizers (Me = 3.1/µl vs. Me = 5.1/µl, P = 0.02). ApoCEC at Day G+1 correlated with the number of aphereses (r = 0.48, P = 0.03). In multivariate analysis, ApoCEC at Day G+1 was an independent factor for successful mobilization during one apheresis.

Conclusions: CECs and their subsets change significantly during mobilization of HSCs. ApoCECs measured at the time of G-CSF commencement can predict the efficacy of HSC collection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jca.21277DOI Listing
October 2013

The kinetics and apoptotic profile of circulating endothelial cells in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders.

Ann Hematol 2013 Sep 1;92(9):1255-62. Epub 2013 May 1.

Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Ciolkowskiego 2, 93-513, Lodz, Poland.

In neoplastic disorders, endothelial cells take part in tumor progression and also influence the recovery of hematopoiesis after high-dose chemotherapy. Measurements of circulating endothelial cells (CEC), their subsets and kinetics were taken in patients with lymphoid malignancies (37 multiple myeloma, ten lymphoma) during autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). CEC were evaluated by four-color flow cytometry at different time points. Additionally levels of angiopoietins 1 and 2 were evaluated by ELISA assay. The baseline number of CECs and their subsets in patients were higher than in the control group. The median CEC number dropped significantly after transplantation (from 9.5/μL to 6.2/μL, p < 0.001). Apoptosis of CECs 24 h after chemotherapy was enhanced in comparison to baseline values (median apoptotic CEC number 4.15/μL vs 3.1/μL; p < 0,001). The time for neutrophil engraftment was shorter for patients with a low apoptotic CEC count at baseline as compared to those with a high apoptotic CEC count (median time to engraftment 13 vs. 16 days respectively, p = 0.04). We observed an adverse correlation of progenitor CEC numbers measured 1 h after transplantation with the time to neutrophil engraftment (r = -0.49, p = 0.008). We also found a negative correlation between the number of CECs originating from microvessels measured 1 h after transplantation, and the time to neutrophil engraftment (r = -0.39, p = 0.04). Baseline angiopoietins 1 and 2 concentration did not influence the post-transplant regeneration time. CEC numbers significantly change during autologous HSCT. Our results suggest that progenitor CECs and CECs derived from microvessels both take part in successful engraftment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-013-1759-4DOI Listing
September 2013

Plasma levels of angiogenic factors and circulating endothelial cells in essential thrombocythemia: correlation with cytoreductive therapy and JAK2-V617F mutational status.

Leuk Lymphoma 2010 Sep;51(9):1727-33

Department of Hematology, Medical University of Łódź, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Łódź, Poland.

Recent studies have shown that angiogenesis plays an important role in the biology of hematological malignancies including essential thrombocythemia (ET). Using cytofluorimetric analysis, the levels of angiogenic factors, as well as the number of circulating endothelial cells (CECs), were determined in 65 patients with ET, including 33 previously untreated and 32 receiving cytoreductive therapy. Correlations between markers of angiogenesis and JAK2-V617F mutational status were also assessed. We found significantly higher levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and markedly decreased levels of placental growth factor in untreated patients with ET with respect to control subjects. VEGF levels were significantly increased in patients with white blood count >8.7 (x 10(9)/L) vs. <8.7 (x 10(9)/L). Furthermore, the levels of VEGF in patients on hydroxyurea (HU) therapy were markedly lower than in untreated patients. It was also demonstrated that the number of all CEC subpopulations (resting, activated, apoptotic, and circulating precursor endothelial cells) was increased in patients with ET in relation to controls, regardless of the JAK2-V617F status, and was not affected by cytoreductive treatment. In conclusion, our study highlights the possible role of angiogenesis in the pathophysiology of ET. It provides evidence that the number of CECs is elevated independently of JAK2-V617F status and is not down-regulated by HU or anagrelide therapy. Our data suggest that VEGF levels are particularly elevated in patients with high leukocytosis. Further investigation should be undertaken to determine the possible role of antiangiogenic therapy in ET.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428194.2010.500435DOI Listing
September 2010

Circulating endothelial cells in essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera: correlation with JAK2-V617F mutational status, angiogenic factors and coagulation activation markers.

Int J Hematol 2010 Jun 15;91(5):792-8. Epub 2010 May 15.

Department of Hematology, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Medical University of Lodz, Ciolkowskiego 2, 93-510, Lodz, Poland.

Angiogenesis plays an important role in the biology of hematological malignancies, including essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia vera (PV). Some data suggests that it has a role in the pathogenesis of thrombosis, the major clinical problem in ET and PV. The number of different subpopulations of circulating endothelial cells (CECs), plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 and 2 (sVEGFR-1,2) and placenta growth factor (PlGF) were determined in 30 patients with ET and 16 patients with PV. Correlations between angiogenesis and JAK2-V617F mutational status, risk factors for thrombosis and coagulation activation markers were also assessed. The number of CEC subpopulations, were markedly higher in ET and PV patients, irrespective of JAK2-V617F status, when compared to the control group. The median values of activated CECs were markedly higher in PV patients with WBC >8.7 (x10(9)/l). Significantly higher VEGF plasma levels were found in ET patients and a similar trend was seen in PV patients in relation to healthy volunteers. The plasma levels of sVEGFR-1 were significantly higher, and PlGF levels markedly lower, in the ET and PV group than in controls. Our study also demonstrated markedly increased levels of D-dimer and TAT complexes in the patient groups. In conclusion, we found that angiogenesis, as measured by CEC numbers, is increased in ET and PV patients regardless of JAK2-V617F mutational status. Our results demonstrated that angiogenic cytokines interact with known thrombotic risk factors. We confirmed the coagulation activation in ET and PV patients but found no differences in levels of coagulation activation markers in relation to JAK2-V617F mutational status.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12185-010-0596-7DOI Listing
June 2010

Evaluation of circulating endothelial cells as noninvasive marker of angiogenesis in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

Leuk Lymphoma 2009 Jan;50(1):62-7

Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

An increased angiogenesis has been documented in bone marrow and lymph nodes of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). There is accumulating evidence that circulating endothelial cells (CECs) play an important role in angiogenesis. The aim of our study was to compare the number of CECs in peripheral blood of CLL patients and healthy donors and to correlate these numbers with bone marrow microvessel density (MVD) and known prognostic factors in CLL. Proportions of resting CECs (rCECs), activated CECs (aCECs), apoptotic CECs (apoCECs) and circulating precursor endothelial cells (CPECs) were estimated by flow cytometry in 104 untreated CLL patients and 29 healthy blood donors. The MVD was analysed in the bone marrow biopsy in 21 CLL patients and 11 controls using the 'hot spot analysis' of vessels' density (x200 HPS). We found significantly higher numbers of CPECs, rCECs, aCECs and apoCECs in CLL patients than in healthy controls (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Furthermore, the rCECs number was higher in advanced versus low clinical stage CLL (median 17.5 cells/microL vs. 13.5 cells/microL, p = 0.05). The MVD was significantly higher in the bone marrow of CLL patients when compared with controls (p = 0.016). However, we did not find any correlation between MVD and different CECs populations. In conclusion, the number of CECs is increased in CLL and correlates with stage of the disease, but does not seem to directly reflect the intensity of neovascularisaton in the bone marrow.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428190802549883DOI Listing
January 2009

Kinetics and apoptotic profile of circulating endothelial cells as prognostic factors for induction treatment failure in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients.

Ann Hematol 2008 Feb 11;87(2):97-106. Epub 2007 Sep 11.

Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Ul. Pabianicka 62, 93-513, Lodz, Poland.

The circulating endothelial cells (CEC) are proposed to be a noninvasive marker of angiogenesis. Recent data suggest that endothelial cells may enhance the survival and proliferation of leukemic blasts and mediate chemotherapy resistance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We analyzed CEC count by the four-color flow cytometry in AML and healthy subjects. We evaluated the kinetics of mature CEC, both resting (rCEC) and activated (aCEC), as well as progenitor (CEPC) and apoptotic CEC (CEC(AnnV+)) in AML patients treated with standard chemotherapy and their influence on response to treatment and overall survival. We found significantly higher numbers of aCEC, rCEC, CEPC, and CEC(AnnV+) in AML patients than in healthy controls. The elevated CEPC and absolute blood counts in peripheral blood as well as the low CEC(AnnV+) number were associated with higher probability of induction treatment failure. aCEC, rCEC, CEPC, and CEC(AnnV+) counts determined in complete remission (CR) were significantly lower than those found at diagnosis. In those CR patients, a significant decrease in the CEC count and increase in the number of CEC(AnnV+) were observed already 24h after the first dose of chemotherapy. In refractory AML, the aCEC, rCEC, CEPC, and CEC(AnnV+) counts assessed before and after induction chemotherapy did not differ significantly, and a significant decrease in CEC count and increase in CEC(AnnV+) number were noted only after the last dose of chemotherapy. The number of CEC is significantly higher in AML patients than in healthy subjects and correlates with response to treatment. The evaluation of CEC kinetics and apoptotic profile may be a promising tool to select AML patients with poor response to chemotherapy who may benefit from antiangiogenic therapies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-007-0372-9DOI Listing
February 2008

Circulating endothelial cells in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

Eur J Haematol 2005 Dec;75(6):492-7

Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland.

Objectives: The circulating endothelial cells (CEC) are proposed to be a non-invasive marker of angiogenesis. The level of CEC in peripheral blood (PB) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients has not been investigated prior to this study. We evaluated the count of resting (rCEC), activated (aCEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (CEPC) in the PB of AML and healthy subjects. In addition we correlated the levels of CEC with disease status, known prognostic factors and response to treatment.

Methods: CEC were quantified by utilizing four-color flow cytometry procedures in 48 AML patients at the time of diagnosis and 29 healthy controls. Additionally, measurements were again taken after the first course of induction treatment in 12 of the patients.

Results: The numbers of aCEC, rCEC and CEPC were significantly higher in the AML patients than in the controls (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The CEC count was significantly higher in the AML patients with white blood cell count (WBC) >15 G/L, elevated lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and a higher (over median) absolute blasts count (ABC) in PB than in the group with WBC <15 G/L (P < 0.03), a normal LDH level (P < 0.03) and a lower (
Conclusion: CEC levels are higher in AML and correlate with disease status and response to treatment. Further investigation should be undertaken to better determine their prognostic value.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0609.2005.00549.xDOI Listing
December 2005

Circulating VEGF and its soluble receptors sVEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-2 in patients with acute leukemia.

Eur Cytokine Netw 2003 Jul-Sep;14(3):149-53

Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Pabianicka 62, 93-513 Lodz, Poland.

Angiogenesis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute leukemia, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a crucial, positive regulator of this process. The biological activity of VEGF is mediated by two different receptor tyrosine kinases: VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-1. The soluble form of VEGFR-1 is likely to be a negative regulator of VEGF availability, but the physiological role of sVEGFR-2 is still unclear. The plasma levels of sVEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-2 in patients with acute leukemia have not been investigated. We measured the plasma concentrations of VEGF and its two soluble receptors in 39 AML and 15 ALL patients as well as in the control group, using the ELISA assay. We also correlated the plasma levels of these proteins with disease status and known prognostic factors. The sVEGFR-1 level was significantly higher in patients with AML and ALL than in the healthy subjects (p < 0.002 and p < 0.03 respectively). The sVEGFR-2 level was significantly higher in AML patients compared with the control group (p < 0.03). The VEGF levels in AML and ALL patients and in healthy subjects did not differ significantly. The sVEGFR-1 level was higher in AML patients with > 50% of blasts in the bone marrow (BM), WBC > 20 G/L and elevated LDH level, than in the group with BM blasts < 50% (p < 0.01), WBC < 20 G/L (p < 0.02) and a normal LDH level (p < 0.05). Positive correlations between sVEGFR-1 level and WBC (p < 0.02),% of BM blasts (p < 0.05), the absolute blast count in peripheral blood (ABC) (p < 0.009) and LDH (p < 0.000001) were found. The sVEGFR-1/VEGF ratio (R1) was calculated, and a positive correlation between R1 and ABC in AML (p < 0.03) was determined. A higher (above median) sVEGFR-1/VEGF ratio correlated with a lower CR rate and a shorter survival (p < 0.03 and p = 0.0007 respectively). In conclusion, the plasma concentration of sVEGFR-1 is higher in leukemia patients than in healthy subjects and correlates with tumour burden and poor prognosis. The sVEGFR-1/VEGF ratio may be of greater prognostic value than VEGF alone. Further investigation is recommended to better determine their function.
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June 2004